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DickB

Fluorocarbon tippets -- new to me

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In earlier posts, I learned a bit about tippets for SW, and a bit about fluorocarban line.  Now, I  think I'm ready to take the hook on some.  Here's what I know and what I know that I don't kow--you can assume correctly that I don't know anything more and gladly welcome advise.



 



It is invisible to fish therefore good but might have some stretch issues (breaking?).



 



I can make up a SW tippet in following weights: 30,25, 20.  This for bluefish, stripers.  Length of each (and total) for, say 9' rod, 7wt. line?



 



Berkely says their fluoro line stretches.  Others don't?



 



Not flyfishing, but...I'd use it for a conventional leader setup for my cast and wait sand eel on hook rig.  Sizing about the same as for a tippet?  Meaning...main out of 30 or 25, and leaders down to 20?



 



Tying off to flyline, line-to-line same as in days of yore?  New knots not needed, right? (have printed out TimS's article on leaders, rigs, teasers...sort of still digesting that, and apologize if I'm asking questions that were answered...).



 



Would also be interested to know about fluoro tippets for FW use as well.



 



Thank you.  Cheers, Dick

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Fluorocarbon vs. nylon is simply one of those personal choices. Me, I can't stand fluorocarbon. Others love it. But you should fish with whatever you feel comfortable with.

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I use Fluoro exclusively for all my salt water striper leaders. I tie my own and keep it simple. I like Orvis Mirage for all sections. I have an old spool of 44# Mirage but I think you can safely substitute another fluoro material at 40# for the butt section.

 

For a 9' leader I use:

1) 3' for butt of 44# looped to loop to the fly line

2) blood knotted to 3' for middle section of 30#

3) then perfection loop to loop with 3' of 20# tippet material

 

Unless you're on the flats sight casting in skinny clear water I don't bother to go to less than 20# Mirage as it's .015" thick. If a finer tippet is required I blood knot in another 20# section after the 30#, then I tippet off with either 3' of 16# or 12# Flouro.

 

I tie to the fly with a duncan loop (uni knot) or non slip mono loop

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Nauset Dog -- I'd guess you'd say the homemade fluorocarban tippet turns nicely?  Thaks for the info. 



 



Would be interested, as well, in flurocarbon tippet recipes for FW, specifically smallmouth bass.



 



Thanks.



 



Dick


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I've never used it for salt, but I use it alot when swinging flies for steelhead and also when drifting nymphs, eggs, etc...  It's nice to be able to go up a few test lbs yet still have the diameter of a lighter lb mono tippet. 



 



As far as connecting mono to fluoro or connecting flouro to fluoro I've been using the J-knot.  It is very simple to tie and it is very strong.



 



Connecting the flouro tippet to the fly I prefer to use a pitzen knot also known as a 16-20 knot.  I haven't used any loop knots for flouro but I am leaning towards the lefty kreh loop.

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Hi Dick,

 

I don't seem to have problems turning my flies over depending on how big they are. FYI, sometimes a level piece of tippet right off the fly line works fine too, I know lots of guys that swear by it for sinking lines. In fact my biggest fly rod striper of 36" was taken at night on a 3' 20# tippet tied directly to the fly line

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A strait shot of 20 lbs. test fluorocarbon eight feet in length works for me.

There should not be any problems with a level line casting saltwater flies.

Tapers are important for fresh water presentations since the flies are almost weightless and wind resistant.

You need that to transfer energy to the end.

 

On other side note.

Remember when there was a disclaimer on older fluorocarbon.

It would weaken over time. It actually had a shelf life and was dated as such.

Since than I haven't seen that disclaimer. The process must be more stable.

 

Instead of throwing the old stuff away since it was so expensive, I use the material in fly tying with a little flash material thrown in.

I said, "what the heck, let me see what it looked like since I've tied many flies with Ultra Hair."

Decided to take an underwater photo of the fly. Tied on a regular mono leader 16 lbs. test.

Surprising here's the results.

 

1000

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Being an old trout fisherman I like to tie up tapered leaders that will easily turn my fly over and land where I'm aiming. I make my leaders by the formula of 50% butt, 30% transition, 20% tippet, so for a ten foot leader I use five feet of fifty lb, eighteen inches forty lb, then eighteen inches of twenty five lb with a loop for a two foot tippet, which is usually sixteen lb Orvis flouro, I've taken to using all flouro for marginally quicker sink rates, but I doubt it makes a measurable difference real world. My fishing is all done on foot in pretty shallow water during daylight, and a lot is to sighted fish, which explains some of my preferences.

JC

As a post script, what is needed when using fast sinking lines is a lot different than when using a floater or intermediate.

JC

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I've been so long out of flyfishing that "old" fluoro is new to me.  Didn't know of it until reading about it here.  Interesting that there are those with a simple straight piece of 20 lb. fluoro, and then those like JonC who are apparently still like me, believing in tapered leaders to present flies/streamers.



 



Got to say, I loved tieing up tapered leaders for trout fishing, but the appeal of a no nonsence staight chunk of 20# line appeals a bit.  I'd only fish streamers in SW, so perhaps Jon C refers to some fly other than, say, the Clouser?  Jon?



 



BTW, Jon, just before the latest cold front roared through on Monday afternoon, we had a serious bout of Cabin Fever and cured it with a trip to Stone River Outfitters in Bedford, NH.  Great place.  I couldn't believe the stock on the walls for flytying.  And darned helpful, knowledgeable guy--Nate--to offer good advice.  Got those kinky bucktails!  Even the wife loved the stuff (you've heard of miracles, right?), and thought it worth a return some day when she'd consider stuff to incorporate into fiber artwork.



 



Cheers to all,  Dick


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My standard flies don't weigh much, and clousers are not in my box, I tie my sand eels with some lead free wire and tie them to the tippet with a nonslip loop knot which allows the fly to sink nose down.

Happy your shopping went well, Nate is a good guy and very knowledgeable.

JC

4993b06c.jpg

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DickB - Spring striped bass fishing in New England all you need is a 4 to 5 foot piece of 20# striaight mono. The fish coming off the spawning beds are HUNGRY and will hit just about any thing presented to them. Clousers, decivers and epoxy whatever's ring the dinner bell for striped bass from May thru mid June.

 

After settling into their summer waters they become introspective and you will need a stealthy presentation. I like a 7.5 12# to 20# tapered leader with a 30" 10# to 15# fulurocarbon tippet.

 

Not too many years ago, while flats fishing in CapeCod Bay my partner and I nailed fish after fish from 25" on up to 42" for the 3 days before and about a day after the full moon in June. the days were sunny and you could spot sand eels by the millions turing the white sand golden when they cover it and bass just cruising thru the big bait schools. On the morning of the 6th day. we were surrounded by big Bass and huge schools of sand eels and not a fish was stirring the pot. They were all hanging out together. The Striped bass were stacked up in the channel coming out of Barnstable Harbor and your could look striaght dwon in 40 feet of water and see the 40"+ fish just sitting there with small shoals of 20 to 25" striped bass swimming placidly thru the ranks of the behemoths. i bounced Clousers from tiny to 5 inches long off their noses and they just sqam out of the way. it about drove my fishing partner crazy. He insisted that he needed to be set ashore and he will get them to bite by wading. I took him in and left him on the long beach and he waded for a couple of miles and had sight fishing shots that were awesome, but never a take. He got so frustrated, he began yelling at the fish.

 

The simple answer was the FISH were totally full of food We had 5 clear days and nights and they fed around the clock in sunlight and in moonlight and got to a point where they were totally full.

 

We pulled out and when to Pleasant Bay and started picking up schoolies by drifting sink tip Clousers, but the rest of the trip was anit-climatic. We too, were sated, even though my friend kept mumbling "It just isn't right!" :wave:

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RJ View Post

DickB - Spring striped bass fishing in New England all you need is a 4 to 5 foot piece of 20# striaight mono. The fish coming off the spawning beds are HUNGRY and will hit just about any thing presented to them. Clousers, decivers and epoxy whatever's ring the dinner bell for striped bass from May thru mid June.

After settling into their summer waters they become introspective and you will need a stealthy presentation. I like a 7.5 12# to 20# tapered leader with a 30" 10# to 15# fulurocarbon tippet.

Not too many years ago, while flats fishing in CapeCod Bay my partner and I nailed fish after fish from 25" on up to 42" for the 3 days before and about a day after the full moon in June. the days were sunny and you could spot sand eels by the millions turing the white sand golden when they cover it and bass just cruising thru the big bait schools. On the morning of the 6th day. we were surrounded by big Bass and huge schools of sand eels and not a fish was stirring the pot. They were all hanging out together. The Striped bass were stacked up in the channel coming out of Barnstable Harbor and your could look striaght dwon in 40 feet of water and see the 40"+ fish just sitting there with small shoals of 20 to 25" striped bass swimming placidly thru the ranks of the behemoths. i bounced Clousers from tiny to 5 inches long off their noses and they just sqam out of the way. it about drove my fishing partner crazy. He insisted that he needed to be set ashore and he will get them to bite by wading. I took him in and left him on the long beach and he waded for a couple of miles and had sight fishing shots that were awesome, but never a take. He got so frustrated, he began yelling at the fish.

The simple answer was the FISH were totally full of food We had 5 clear days and nights and they fed around the clock in sunlight and in moonlight and got to a point where they were totally full.

We pulled out and when to Pleasant Bay and started picking up schoolies by drifting sink tip Clousers, but the rest of the trip was anit-climatic. We too, were sated, even though my friend kept mumbling "It just isn't right!" HappyWave.gif



RJ -- Plan is to show up in July, so I'll be on to those introspective, picky, skittish, sulking, elusive fish.  Doesn't matter much except that I have fun fishing.  The rush of a hookup is always something, though, no doubt about it.  I liked your story--did the soul good, and have a few of my own from long long ago FL days....  Snook taken one after another by fish-by-the-pound-for-$ spearfishermen while rod and reel guys got nothing: the snook were thick on the bottom and just laying there, rising to nothing so must have been full.  And I hooked and landed a 5+ lb. black bass (kid of 8 yrs. old) using a 1" thick wood stick pole and some carpenter's string, a hook, and a big yellow grasshopper I picked off a bush on the way to a canal--  by practically forcing it down it's mouth time after time, flowing it down with the current and bumping that grasshopper on its snout, until it became exasperated and unwisely decided to take a chomp.



 



But, back to the Cape, I hope to cast for joy or joy+fish.  And, given an antidote to our lousing western MA weather lately, I'm now practically rigged and ready to go. Just have to tie up a batch of flies, get some tippets figured out and tied, go out to the pasture and check out it all out with some casts.  There's something good, after all, in lousy out of season weather!



 



Again, thanks for that story.  -- Dick


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Thanks Dick. i lived in Stockbridge and W. Stockbridge for about three years. Loved the trout fishing, Tanglewood on Parade and those funky resturants in Gt. Barrington. Shot skeet two to three times a week at the Stockbridge Sportsmen's Club. The Housey was a good place to nymph. And that little stream that runs along side the NYST Extension in Cannan, NY was a gem.

 

See if you can find out where you can connect with blue fish in skinny water on the cape. I've heard rumors of great days of fishing, but never spent any time on the Cape when the roads are congested (July and August) A wade guide might be the ticket.

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RJ

 

skinny water blues to 10 pounds in May in Cotuit....very fine just so long as the wind stays sw ...east wind kills it...PM me for details..20 to 30 fish a tide very do-able...squid tied orange, yellow, chart

 

luke

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