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music321

which rod weight?

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I don't make it to the ocean to fish that often.  I probably go, under normal circumstances, twice a year.  I will fish around long island sound (mostly), or in Maine.  I fish from shore, or from very near shore in a canoe.  I had a pier rod that I ditched, because it was too much of a pain in the neck.  It was way too large to cast and recast.  It was really made for tossing bait out, and letting it sit there.



 



I was in florida a few years ago, and fished from a boat near shore for spanish mackerel, and from the beach for sheapshead, small jacks, etc.  I used 14 pound test "super braided line" with freshwater bass-weight rods, and everything worked well.



 



I bought an ll bean travel rod that I’ve used in the sound.  It packs small, and is easy to use since it’s so small.  I used it on one occasion to catch schooling bluefish (about 5 lbs) with no problems at all.



The rod is 6’6”, rated at 6-12 lbs, and I used more 14 pound test test "super braided line". 



I like the idea of a light rod, but worry that this might be too light.  I can exchange the rod for one of two other models that they offer:



7’0”, rated 8-17



7’0”, rated 10-20



 



I don’t want to go too heavy.  My gut feeling is that I probably want the 8-17 lb test rod.  What do you think?  Thanks.


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Welcome to the site Music. To me, rod weights mean very little as their is no standard in the industry for rating them. One manufacturers light weight may be equal to anothers medium weight. With that said, from a canoe I would use a L or ML 7' rod for throwing soft plastics or a M rod for plugs. Spool the reels with 20 or 30 pound braid and use 20 or 25 pound florocarbon leader attached to the braid. From the shore I would use an 8' to 10' M rod with 40 pound braid.

 

Keep in mind that's it's possible to catch a 50 pounder from the shore or a canoe, realistly you are going to catch thousands of smaller ones and tons of boofish before that day comes. Enjoy the fight, go light.

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If you are going to have one rod only, I'd get the 10-20lb rod. It gives you more options and will still perform like the 8-17 for the most part.

 

I also use a bass rod sometimes when shore fishing. Nothing wrong with that at all. I caught blackfish, blue fish and a small tuna on it before I bought a 7ft salt rod to replace it for that. Biggest fish I caught on that bass rod was an 8 lb blue fish, which I can assure you fights a crap ton harder than a large mouth if the same size. Rod did great and I have no problems recommending using them in the salt so long as you fight the fish instead if just cranking it in.

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If you are going to have one rod only, I'd get the 10-20lb rod. It gives you more options and will still perform like the 8-17 for the most part.

 

 

 

And don't forget an electric winch on it to crank them in. :D Man, you like heavy rods Scott. I'm just the opposite, as light as possible. Enjoy the fight, go light.

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That's the mono line weight rating. My heaviest rod as far as lure weight is a 3-8. The seven footer I mentioned is a 1-4 oz.

 

Even light bass rods have line ratings up to 14 or 17 lbs. So I am not sure what you mean?

 

I am certainly not going to go blue fishing with an ultralight.

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That's the mono line weight rating. My heaviest rod as far as lure weight is a 3-8. The seven footer I mentioned is a 1-4 oz.

 

Even light bass rods have line ratings up to 14 or 17 lbs. So I am not sure what you mean?

 

I am certainly not going to go blue fishing with an ultralight.

 

I was just joking Scott, but your set ups are a lot heavier than mine. My 7' St. Croix Surf (PSRS70L) is rated 4 to 6 lb line and the other ML is rated for 6 to 8 lb line. I have 2 of each and use these all the time for stripers and boofish.

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I'm starting to rethink this.  I might keep the 6' 6" rod for small blues, flounder, etc. and then get something heavier "just in case."  Seeing as how I only head to the ocean once in a great while, I can't imagine tangling into the the "once in a season" monster very often.  Thanks for the advice, though.


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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bass Ackwards View Post

I was just joking Scott, but your set ups are a lot heavier than mine. My 7' St. Croix Surf (PSRS70L) is rated 4 to 6 lb line and the other ML is rated for 6 to 8 lb line. I have 2 of each and use these all the time for stripers and boofish.



 



Well I do use conventionals, I don't like casting conventionals with lights and ultralights. I have one medium and a few MH. I have one ultralight with a small spinning reel on it that my youngest uses when going for snappers or freshwater fishing.


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line weight ratings mean absolutely nothing. nothing. at all. they do not correspond to any physical properties of the rod and a rod does not know or care what strength line you're using on it.

 

I want you to ignore line weight ratings for here on out, OK? forget that silly number on the sticker even exists - you'll be much better off if you do.

 

what matters is lure or casting weight ratings - they tell you, with some accuracy, what weights the rod can effectively and safely cast. this is the only number you need to be concerned with. get a good idea of what you'll be casting and what those lures, baits, weights, etc. weigh and use that range to pick an appropriately rated rod, or rods, and use whatever line weight and type appropriately corresponds to what your fishing application demands...

 

lighter lines and/or braids for more distance, a softer feel, more challenging fights on light drag, added line capacity, etc.

 

heavier lines and/or mono for durability around rocks, other sharp things like bluefish teeth, ease of tying knots in the cold and dark, general toughness and peace of mind.

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So, EBHarvey,



 



You're saying that I should call up the manufacturer regarding their "line weight" ratings?



 



Just kidding.  smile.gif



 



Well, it's good to know that they mean nothing.  What about rod length?  I'm guessing that it doesn't matter at all if a rod is 6'6" or 7'0", right?


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I found for me a 7' rod in the boat was ideal. I can cast as far as needed with it and gives me good control of 9" Sluggos which I use more than 90% of the time.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by music321 View Post


So, EBHarvey,



 



You're saying that I should call up the manufacturer regarding their "line weight" ratings?



 



Just kidding.  smile.gif



 



Well, it's good to know that they mean nothing.  What about rod length?  I'm guessing that it doesn't matter at all if a rod is 6'6" or 7'0", right?





If you need a lot of accuracy in casting, then go with a 6 or 6'6", but I find I only need that when freshwater bass fishing. I find 7ft is perfect for casting off the beach or jetty when I don't need to cast a mile, but want to cast to holes, banks and rocks.



 



Eli,



I know the line rating doesn't _mean_ anything because it's a derivitive number, but it still gives you a good idea what weight of fish you can fight with the rod. If the rod is rated for up to 8-15 lb of mono line, then you know the rod is _probably_ well suited for landing fish that you would use 8-15lb mono line to pull in. Don't you think?

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So, EBHarvey,

 

You're saying that I should call up the manufacturer regarding their "line weight" ratings?

 

Just kidding.  :)

 

Well, it's good to know that they mean nothing.  What about rod length?  I'm guessing that it doesn't matter at all if a rod is 6'6" or 7'0", right?

 

Actually, manufacturers know the ratings don't have any real meaning, but they put them on rods for one of two reasons, based on my conversations with them:

 

one is to provide a very general guideline for people who don't understand or care about what we might call the 'finer points' of fishing gear selection. many people broadly equate certain types of fishing to certain line sizes, so slapping an 8-10 pound test label on a rod does carry some meaning to the guy buying a rod to take his kid fishing once a month - he might look at that and say "I remember using 8 pound test to fish for bass when i was a kid, that looks like the right rod" and there's probably enough correlation between the use of 8# line and casting things weighing whatever the rod's lure weight rating might be that he's probably going to find it fits his intended use just fine. in essence, the average person has a better idea of the notion of "pound test" than they do of what their bobbers and rubber worms actually weigh, so it gives those people something to go on..

 

the second is a breakage and warranty issue. I know for a fact that st. croix does this and I'm sure others do too.....they slap a line weight rating on a rod that's under, even just a little bit under (ever wonder why some of their rods are rated for 17# line?) what people would otherwise use on it so it has a smaller chance of breaking if that person happens to be high-sticking with a locked-down drag, and if it does break then they can claim that it was used improperly, with line heavier than it was designed for, and thus try to get out of replacing it. i have heard warranty department people actually ask the question of the rod's owner "what strength line were you using?" even though the amount of drag determines the stress being put on a rod, not the underlying breaking strength of the line. they do the same with their lure ratings - under-rate just a little bit.

 

Anyway, rod length does matter - it plays a role in casting distance, versatility, maneuverability, weight, and a huge role in a rod's action or feel which in turn greatly affects how well it fishes certain lures or certain situations. you need to think of everythign relating to length as a tradeoff:

 

longer rods can cast farther, have a softer action for a given lure weight, provide a sensitive tip yet cast heavy stuff, allow you to steer a fish more effectively through a longer 'reach' and control the angle of your line and lure, keep them above big waves... but they are also heavy, harder to handle, suffer from being perpetually tip heavy in most cases, are hard to store and transport, often cost more....

 

shorter rods are easier to store, move, carry, use in tight quarters when you're near other people or on a boat, usually weight less and provide a better mechanical advanatge over the fish.... but in order to cast heavier weights need to be stiff so lack soft sensitive tip sections or slower midsections that allow one to work lures like pencil poppers in a traditional way, don't usually cast as far as longer rods, and don't enable one to guide fish around rocks or lift a fish up onto a jetty.

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