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BradyMoss

Siwash or o'shaughnessy

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What is the difference between the siwash and the single o'shaughnessy besides the siwash having the open eye? I bought some single o'shaughnessy and want to put them on some of my plugs.

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The shape. (An open eye does not define a hook style). The o'shaw has a slightly narrower bend and usually longer shank than a siwash of the same size.

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Siwash is used on a tail hook depending on what you want to do O,shanughnessy can be a longer shank.

Hook shapes and names are as varied as fish themselves. In some cases hooks are identified by a traditional or historic name, e.g. Aberdeen, Limerick or O'Shaughnessy. In other cases, hooks are merely identified by their general purpose or have included in their name, one or more of their physical characteristics. Some manufacturers just give their hooks model numbers and describe their general purpose and characteristics. For example:

Eagle Claw: 139 is a Snelled Baitholder, Offset, Down Eye, Two Slices, Medium Wire

Lazer Sharp: L2004EL is a Circle Sea, Wide Gap, Non-Offset, Ringed Eye, Light Wire

Mustad Model: 92155 is a Beak Baitholder hook

Mustad Model: 91715D is an O'Shaughnessy Jig Hook, 90 degree angle

TMC Model 300: Streamer D/E, 6XL, Heavy wire, Forged, Bronze

TMC Model 200R: Nymph & Dry Fly Straight eye, 3XL, Standard wire, Semidropped point, Forged, Bronze

 

The shape of the hook shank can vary widely from merely straight to all sorts of curves, kinks, bends and offsets. These different shapes contribute in some cases to better hook penetration, fly imitations or bait holding ability. Many hooks intended to hold dead or artificial baits have sliced shanks which create barbs for better baiting holding ability. Jig hooks are designed to have lead weight molded onto the hook shank. Hook descriptions may also include shank length as standard, extra long, 2XL, short, etc. and wire size such as fine wire, extra heavy, 2X heavy, etc.

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You can use what ever you want, the hook police won't come get you. The eye of the O'Shaughnessy may not move as freely as the siwash, but you can sue it. I have a 7/0 Gami Octopus hook on a roberts ranger and it works fine.

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That looks like a Mustad 9175, I use them on the back of all my plugs. I use size 7/0 and since you posted about split ring gaps I will warn you about these hooks causing that problem. I don't know what size you are using, what I do is spread the eye gap on the hook, place the split ring in and close the eye up again. I make up about a dozen at a time and keep them handy.

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The 9175D has a small eye which doesn't allow for a heavy split ring. Unless you use an open eye O'Shaughnessy, a split ring will make the hook ride sideways on the back of a plug which could harm the action.

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Any other hooks with larger eyes out there, I am looking for an alternative. It's hard to look at hooks online or in catalogs and get an accurate read on them.

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Siwash has a longer barb than the O'shaughnessy. It's a little harder to set, but once set, harder for a fish--particularly a jumping fish--to throw. It was originally designed for the Pacific salmon fishery, where fish often go into the air. So to address BradyMoss, if you're fishing for jumping fish such as blues, the Siwash is a better bet.

 

Tthe O'Shaughnessy is Jack-of-all-trades in salt water. It can do a lot of things well enough, although more specialized hooks can do specific tasks better. It's easier to set than the O'Shaughnessy, so if you're using light line, a soft rod or are hooking something a long way from the rod tip, where there might be some slack in the line, it will be easier to sink into a fish's jaw, particularly if it hits bone. It's also easier to use with some baits due to the shorter barb (balances better with whole sandworms, for example). On the other hand, fish can throw it easier than the Siwash.

 

It's all a matter of experimenting and finding which one you like best for your particular application.

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