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Islander80

Spinning vs. Conventional Gears

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Why is it that all of your conventional reels have cut brass or bronze main gears and your spinners with the exception of the Torque have aluminum alloy main gears? I am asking you guys because you’re the only company putting yourselves out there in a public forum to answer questions like this. It seems to be an industry standard though with Daiwa, Shimano and Abu all having the same setups in their spinning and conv. reels.

 

The only thing I can think is that it is easier to machine a gear with the teeth on the edges than one with the teeth on the face. I can picture a die running down a piece of bronze round stock to make conventional gears. You can’t do that with a spinning gear unless it is setup like a 704 or DAM quick.

 

Thanks,

Islander80

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I'm guessing, but bronze and stainless gears are capable of great smoothness when they've run together a little and are quite strong. Brass is cheaper. The cold-forged aluminum or aluminum bronze gears that are so common at the high end are as strong as you can get, except for SS on SS, as in some big game reels.

 

I'll be very interested in the answers to this one myself.

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Why is it that all of your conventional reels have cut brass or bronze main gears and your spinners with the exception of the Torque have aluminum alloy main gears? I am asking you guys because you’re the only company putting yourselves out there in a public forum to answer questions like this. It seems to be an industry standard though with Daiwa, Shimano and Abu all having the same setups in their spinning and conv. reels.

 

The only thing I can think is that it is easier to machine a gear with the teeth on the edges than one with the teeth on the face. I can picture a die running down a piece of bronze round stock to make conventional gears. You can’t do that with a spinning gear unless it is setup like a 704 or DAM quick.

 

Thanks,

Islander80

 

Your right, it's the shape of the gears in the spinners that make it more time consuming to make. And your also right about the old style 704 gear shape would be easier to cut.

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Its not really a complaint just a question. I have yet to feel any slop in my slammers or battles. But I was servicing my 525, battles and slammers a few weeks ago and it got me to thinking.

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Both cost and weight considerations.

 

Conventional Drive Gears can be very simply machined out of a flat plate that has unexceptional thickness. In lever drag reels they are remarkably thin and even have holes drilled for additional weight savings.

 

Due to how Drive Gears are cut in spinning reels (helical) they are much deeper and require much thicker stock.

 

Then, considering how much larger and more complicated the Pinion is in a spinning reel, in general, how much larger the Drive Gear is in a spinning reel as well you end up with a two fold problem:

 

1. You have significant increase in cost due to more machining of expensive material.

 

2. You have a more significant weight penalty as both Main and Pinion are larger.

 

 

The high end reels then end up going to extraordinary length to save weight as their gears are so heavy. The low end reels can't do it, so they must use Aluminum alloys (typically with Zinc) to get their price/performance/weight equation in balance.

 

Something like that anyways :).

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