Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
prican1

Advice needed with baitcaster

14 posts in this topic

I'm strictly a saltwater angler but I need some advice pertaining to using a low profile baitcaster. I'm using a shimano curado 300ej with 8 & 9ft. casting rods medium/fast action, I will be casting plugs in the 1.5 to 3oz. range. My question is what type line would be best for my application, should I use heavy braid, fluorcarbon or mono. I've heard that using heavy braid gives you a better cast, I never used fluorocarbon as my main line but many Bass Champs swear by it on the WFN channel. I'll be targeting bass & bluefish from the surf. Any advice would appreciated, thanks.

 

 

Carlos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two Curado 301e's that I use to throw baits that size but for freshwater. One I have 65lb power pro on it and the other has Big Game 20lb mono on it. Since you may be making longer casts I would go with the 65lb braid so you can react quicker with the hookset. Some of the swimbait guys I know say never to use braid when throwing heavier baits because they actually have more of a chance of being broken off on the cast than with mono because there is not shock absorbtion. I personally have not had any problems yet with that. Make sure you breakdown and clean those regularly because they aren't the greatest at keeping water out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks fellas for the info, so itseems that heavier braid would be best for what I wan't to do. Now what's the deal with using fluorocarbon as your main line? Does fluoro cast well? I've heard that it's mainly used when the water is clear so fish won't can't see the line, is this true?

 

Carlos

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I fish with baitcasters in the surf I use Shimano Calcutta’s, although they are not low profile, I’ve used 40lb and 50lb braid on both the round 150 and 250 size (Calcutta’s) and 200 size low profile (Curados) without any problems whatsoever. I am currently using 50lb braid Sufix on a 250 Calcutta, I am usually casting nothing more than 2 1/4 oz with my baitcasters. I’ve even went as thin as 20lb braid when throwing lighter lures under 2 oz, without any windknots, breakoffs or backlashes. With the bigger 300 size Curado, I would go like the previous posters have stated with 65 lb braid.

 

As for fluorocarbon, I don’t it use for my main line. When I do use it, I use it mainly for leader but not for visibility reasons. I use it when I’m fishing subsurface diving lures, or lures I want to go a little deeper. Fluorocarbon is denser than mono and it sinks faster which is why I use it as a leader only when fishing subsurface diving lures. I don’t use as a leader it for topwater or surface lures, because it sinks. I’ll use mono for surface lures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^you are the man casting 20lb Big Game......it's easily 30lb+ breaking strength.

 

Probably 65lb braid would be the best, imho, although a thicker co-polymer would be easier to clear in the dark than braid. Silver Thread or the like. I don't think fluro will do a thing for you w the style of fishing you're talking. Those are some big plugs for that reel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
^you are the man casting 20lb Big Game......it's easily 30lb+ breaking strength.

 

Probably 65lb braid would be the best, imho, although a thicker co-polymer would be easier to clear in the dark than braid. Silver Thread or the like. I don't think fluro will do a thing for you w the style of fishing you're talking. Those are some big plugs for that reel.

Haha, when you are throwing 3oz lures that cost as much as the rod I do not want them sailing off into the sunset. Also it is used more because of the lure size and not because of the fish I am fishing for.(you know a 6lb largie isn't going to break that off in open water :D )And the Curado 300 will handle a 3oz lure just fine. I wouldn't suggest throwing a giant double cowgirl(dual #10s) with one but a normal 3oz plug is nothing for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to take the thread in a different direction, but, can any one recommend an 8 or 9 ft bait casting rod that I can use in the salt and then fresh for muskies ? I would prefer a "reasonably" priced rod that will not exhaust my wrist and arm at the end of the day. It will primarily be used out front from the beach probably 3 oz. baits max and then from a boat for muskies. Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not to take the thread in a different direction, but, can any one recommend an 8 or 9 ft bait casting rod that I can use in the salt and then fresh for muskies ? I would prefer a "reasonably" priced rod that will not exhaust my wrist and arm at the end of the day. It will primarily be used out front from the beach probably 3 oz. baits max and then from a boat for muskies. Thanks in advance.

I have the perfect rod for you riverrunner. Check out the Okuma EVX musky series rods. I think I have the 8' heavy which is rated for 2-6ozs but I can throw 1oz bucktails on it with no problem. The rod isn't a log but it isn't too light either; it is an 8' rod. :D I like it for throwing big spinnerbaits and small bucktails(small for musky standards.) Okuma also has a great warranty program and a price you cannot beat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also Okuma makes a decent swimbait rod that would be a little easier on the wrists, forgot your an old man. :D They are made with a slower action though which isn't optimal for musky fishing but it will get you by with no problem. The rod is called the guide series big bait casting and the 7'11" MH or H would be a good choice also. They are rated higher than how they fish IMHO. I have the 7'6" MH and I wouldn't want to be throwing anything other 2ozs on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also Okuma makes a decent swimbait rod that would be a little easier on the wrists, forgot your an old man. :D They are made with a slower action though which isn't optimal for musky fishing but it will get you by with no problem. The rod is called the guide series big bait casting and the 7'11" MH or H would be a good choice also. They are rated higher than how they fish IMHO. I have the 7'6" MH and I wouldn't want to be throwing anything other 2ozs on it.

 

The slow action and braid is probably going to be a sweet casting setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you thinking the inlet with lures or bait from the beach? If lures, a rod I've pulled a fair amount of double duty with has been the st croix Tidemaster 8 ft. heavy... Lots of delmarva stripers on that rod and even a susky ski or two. If you don't mind spending a little more $$ the Avid inshore version is even nicer--lighter weight and more powerful... Would be a great double duty stick.

 

If your thinking a little closer to 9 foot, a good rod (for very reasonable price) that has become very popular with a lot of musky guys is the Tackle industries 9 footer... You'd prolly want to check out the Medium heavy. I haven't used these personally, but one of my fishing buddies uses them a lot and I trust his judgement on rods. I tend to stick to the shorter rods, since usually fishing from shore or wading mostly instead of the boat. Could definitely see how you'd want a longer rod though if your bait fishing from the beach, and then ski fishing from your boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fluoro will give you no advantage unless your around rocks because its more abrasion resistant than both braid and mono, but the amount of drawbacks in this case far outweigh the benefits.

 

Fluoro:

-sinks

-more abrasion resistant

-more "invisible" to fish

-less stretch than mono but a lot more than braid

-very expensive compared to mono

-a little thinner than mono

-much stiffer than both other types of line

 

Braid:

-floats

-virtually no stretch

-very visible underwater

-not abrasion resistant at all

-very thin diameter

-great casting distance

 

Mono:

-floats

-decent bit of stretch

-still visible underwater yet not a worrying amount at all

-higher lb tests are pretty abrasion resistant, lower lb tests not so much

-very cheap

 

In your case, casting those weights I would opt for either 50 or 65 lb braid in a high vis color (yellow or neon green) and use a short (18-24 inch) mono leader in 20 lb. That gives you the casting distance with the abrasion resistance that will really come in handy should you get around any rocks or oyster beds

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the perfect rod for you riverrunner. Check out the Okuma EVX musky series rods. I think I have the 8' heavy which is rated for 2-6ozs but I can throw 1oz bucktails on it with no problem. The rod isn't a log but it isn't too light either; it is an 8' rod. :D I like it for throwing big spinnerbaits and small bucktails(small for musky standards.) Okuma also has a great warranty program and a price you cannot beat.

 

Skunk, PaulM,TJ.....when I get a chance to digest the info I'll get back to you. Thanks so much !!! Skunk, that info was exactly what I was looking for. I understand what I am asking for will not be perfect for all situations, but I can compensate. Let me think about it. Thanks all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.