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Flyfishing sanity check

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I've decided to explore flyfishing from the kayak

I'm looking at getting a 8W outfit

I bought a video to try to learn all the basics

I'm curious about the specific stiper technique however-

 

Do you just randomly cast for them as if you were using a bass assasin?

or do you have to spot them visually first-

What has me interested is the testimonials from

flyrodders who swear by it being so much fun.

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I recommend that you get your self a Scotty fly rod holder and attach it to the stern of your kayak. Put the rod in it and adjust it so that the rod is parallel to the water. This way the rod doesn't dampen the movement of the streamer. Get the fly out about 50 feet and troll or drift around the edges of structure. Take note of hits and work that area. This is a tried and true method. Personally when I find a fish I go back and figure out where the best anchorage is so I can cast and work my fly around where I caught the fish. Others like to drift again but I like to work the producing area more thoroughly. There is more to it but you will figure that out as you spend more time doing the basics.

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I haven't been chasing them with fly tackle long but have some opinions so here goes. Your fishing situation may be entirely different.

 

I would go with 9wt minimum and a 10wt is probably best all around. I find I'm always trying to poke it into the wind, there's always some wind. I also started catching a lot more fish when I started using sinking lines. You will also want the bigger lines for casting bigger flies. I am trying out shooting heads this season, they seem to be the ticket for kayaks. You can retrieve almost to the leader and still easily have the head out for your next cast with one back cast.

 

Early season I find them packed in estuaries and keep drifting over them, low and slow, bright clousers. FF is almost essential for this. Later, again in estuaries, big flies for the herring run. Sink them in holes, run them through riffs, troll them. Late June trolling and casting flies on the flats at night, sight casting (they laugh at me), big flies drifted deep over structure with current. They love the green water around rocks.

 

I often abandon the fly rod to chase that 40 lber but I plan to work some big flies, maybe some squid patterns, on shoals deep on lead core just for grins. Odds are slim but wouldn't it be something?

 

While large may be hard to fool sometimes on artificials I think you can target the depth and location of the fish very well with fly tackle so at least you can be pretty sure they rejected you rather than you didn't get it to them.

 

I also have some worm and shrimp patterns to carry for when they are just slurping small bait.

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Both the above comments are acurate and indicate that like with all fishing you change techniques based on the conditions. When we fish at night we see the fish on top.floating line and small flies seem to work awsome. But if I was trolling I would want a sinking line. If I was drifting a steep mudbank where the fly will only be in the prime spot for a brief period the sinking tip sounds ideal. I actualy use a 7 foot 5 wheight because it is short and compact and I can cast while under bridges. But I only use the fly rod when there are a ton of small fish around. I have landed 28 inch on the little 5 wheight with no problem. Good luck you will have a ball. Just use common sense until you gain experience then you can be nuts like us.

Barrell

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