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Carrying rods on Roof Rack

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Ummm, tip towards the back of the truck. When you end up having some sort of road crap hit the rods, it will happen, guaranteed, the butt is a lot stronger than the tip. Even a small rock kicked up can knick the guides. Also I like the bottom of the reel facing into the wind instead of the spool, even though I use reel covers.

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What Pakalolo says does make sense although I've been guilty of the 'tip forward' driving.

 

While on the beach, it doesn't matter at all and I keep the tips forward when I'm driving along reading the surf. I have a Jeep Cherokee and if I stop and lift the tailgate, with tips pointed to the rear, it would break them or not be able to open.

 

If I'm headed onto the highway, I usually break them down and bring into the jeep due to all the road crud that definitely ends up on the rods. You don't have to have a small rock kick up in order for the rods/reels to pick up dirt and grime from highway driving.

 

Btw, I have the Thule racks as well....

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2¢      I can’t see where it makes any difference.  I can’t imagine any significant or damaging difference because of air resistance. 



 



Either consciously (or subconsciously) most people would think of the tip as the forward portion of the rod; therefore, pointing forward toward the front is the way it is most frequently put into racks.



 



Somebody with a pickup truck might choose to have the top end of the rods extend back and over the bed, if they extend unreasonably far beyond the front of the truck. 



 



Do what looks good to you or works best for you.   wink.gif



 



 



P.S.   What pakalolo said is definately worth consideration.  (Mine are pointed foward on my SUV, because they would extend too far beyond the back and even butt ends, on long rods, are bothersome when opening up the back.)


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Ummm, tip towards the back of the truck. When you end up having some sort of road crap hit the rods, it will happen, guaranteed, the butt is a lot stronger than the tip. Even a small rock kicked up can knick the guides. Also I like the bottom of the reel facing into the wind instead of the spool, even though I use reel covers.

 

While this makes sense, if i put my rods in the rack with the butt facing front, the tips would stick so far past the back of the truck i would be worried about another vehicle passing behind my truck and taking the rod tips off. In the 14 years I have owned the truck, I have never had a problem with the tips forward. They present a small target afterall...

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With the position of the cross bars on most 4x4 suv's , butts to the rear is the only way a 9' or longer rod should face. they would extend beyond the bumper and need flags according to DOT regulations. on pickups there's a different story as roof mounted racks give over 11 feet of space to have your rods point aft. but again it all depends on the pickup and it's set up (cap, ladder racks etc).

And I too recommend braking down rods or putting them inside when highway traveling. I myself have lost a rod and reel while on the road.

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The tip forward wouldn't be a problem except for two circumstances, debris gets above the car/truck, then you could damage the tips, and the wind profile of the travelling car could cause the tips to start tapping the roof. As far as wind speed...Shoot, do you know how fast the tip is flying through the air during a good cast? A whole lot faster than you car can possibly go......so that's not an issue.



 



I agree with travelling butt first. And I personally would keep my reels inside with me, but that's just me. Only takes 60 seconds to reattach the reel and restring the rod.


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It all depends and what previous posters have mentioned also makes sense.

 

I believe I have the same setup as you, Thule flat top ski rack.

 

For me, I typically travel 75+ miles each way on major highways so in these conditions, I put the rod/s on with the butt facing forward. I've been transporting them this way for over 6 years now and haven't had any issues.

 

At first I would transport them with the butt facing the rear of the car, however during the long rides, with high winds, crosswinds, airflow over the front of the car, and air turbulence caused by big SUV's and trucks, I noticed the front of the rods dancing and bending all over the place.

After 2 trips, I started transporting them with the butt towards the front.

As "pakalolo" mentioned, the butt is much stronger and shorter so it's not susceptible to the conditions I noted above.

 

Once I'm at my fishing spot the rod comes off and should I move to another location (within a short drive), the rod goes on the car with the tip facing forward. Longer drives the butt faces forward.

 

As for the damage to reels, when the butt faces forward, I place the rod in the rack so the reel sits just behind the front ski rack and load bars.

Should you encounter any debris (bugs, rocks, etc.) during your ride, the load bars and ski rack will serve as a protective barrier. In my particular setup, the reel doesn't hang below the load bar and the I always make sure the reel handle is positioned so it's protected by the load bar, ski rack.

 

Here's an example: A couple of years ago, I was driving a local road between fishing spots. It was about 12 miles between spots.

As I'm driving along at about 30 MPH, out of the corner of my eye I see a sea gull which had just lifted off the ground from eating food on the sidewalk. It was a big a** bird and the next thing I saw was it getting whacked by the rod butt (which was facing forward).

Had my rod tips been facing forward, I'm sure things would have been a lot worse and it most likely would have resulted in a broken rod.

 

Hope this helps.

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