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slip n slide

Herring...what kind?

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Springtime means our local specialty fish store here in Ohio gets herring in from the E coast.Most are blue/black on their backs but some,which are a bit larger than the blue-black ones,are more of an olive-bronze tone.The blue ones have softer,slightyl darker and more fine textured meat and are even more mild in flavor (if that's possible) than the green ones.



I can see why stripers like to eat them,tasty lil fishes!


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Ted,

 

The slightly larger ones are call Ale Wives. Read the thread Herring of NY it gives you a idea of the differences between the two River Herring species. Or go on line and search the NY State Hudson River Fisheries Unit and click the article. It comes with pictures as well as the differences between the tow species.

 

I'm getting itchy for May and Cape Cod. Bob

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Bob,I remember alewives from the grt lks...different fish.



I did a lil  bit of looking around and found bluebacks and river herring w/ the last being the likely culprit regarding the green backed fish.



We have skipjack herring in the Ohio river,fight and look like tarpon,to about 5lb max but 1-2lbs on avg.Wouild'nt think of ever eating one of those as they're godawfully stenchful,unlike herring from the sea.



7 wks and counting...


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Not the same as blueback? That looks like the blue ones I've been eating. Are the green ones not river herring? I am unable to detect the spot near the pecs shown in pics of river herring on the fish I'm getting....look more like ciscoes,but I know those aint in the ocean.


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river_herring.jpg



good info there feetinsand.



 



Hey Slip - the fish that are traditionally harvested in the ocean are Atlantic Herring. As you can see they are much narrower than the two types of River Herring above. I'm not a herring expert though and could be wrong...


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river_herring.jpg

 

good info there feetinsand.

 

Hey Slip - the fish that are traditionally harvested in the ocean are Atlantic Herring. As you can see they are much narrower than the two types of River Herring above. I'm not a herring expert though and could be wrong...

 

you got it rigth researchdude. Atlantic Herring spawn in saltwater and river Herring as shown above need fresh water to get it on!"

 

slip n slide what you call alewives are land locked alewives that are Great Lakes are called "Mooneyes" in the Hudson River Valley and the NY City reservoirs in the Catskill Mountians. Main source of protein for brown and rainbow trout in the lakes. The streams that feed into the reservoirs get huge spring runs of them spawning. Prolific little critters..

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Mooneye is in the genus Hiodon(as is golden eye and both have a wicked set of teeth),atlantic menhaden are Brevoortia and the inland menhaden is an Alosa.The mooneye is present in the grt lks but not in any big #'s like the menhaden used to be before the introduction of zebra mussels.


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Don't the hickories tend to show up early fall? I caught a ton of em as bycatch on small metals for snappers. Seen them hit plugs too and get up to 16"+.

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Joker, they do. But they can theoretically be here around this time. This year, no, it has been too cold, but basically in March through May, they spawn, in 60 degree water. I believe this was a reference to his experiences over multiple years, and with a warm winter, and early spring, 60 is not unheard of in that time frame. So in years past, you MAY have gotten one of these.

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Don't the hickories tend to show up early fall? I caught a ton of em as bycatch on small metals for snappers. Seen them hit plugs too and get up to 16"+.

 

They're here all summer, I use them for crab bait.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by j0k3r View Post

Don't the hickories tend to show up early fall? I caught a ton of em as bycatch on small metals for snappers. Seen them hit plugs too and get up to 16"+.



Those must be the ones I catch on my flashier teasers in the surf in the fall...may have to drag some back for the smoker next time.



 



Chief, the green-backed ones do look like those hickories


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