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StriperSurg

Squid Jigs

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I see a lot of folks talking about Squid fishing, where, when, how, cooking them etc...

I do not see any information about the jigs that are used, and yes, I do know about the various

manufacturers out there, but what I do not know about, is what is the standard size used?

 

Do folks really use 5" jigs for squid fishing? For some reason I'm thinking 3" would suffice.

I have never fished for Squid, planned on doing it for a couple of years, but haven't gotten

the opportunity, I plan on trying it this year.

 

So, how about some recommendations on the jigs you use, the typical size, is one brand better

than the other, if so why.

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Like fishing for any species, matching the present bait in the area is key. Thats why in my squid jig box I carry small 1" jigs up to 5" jigs.

 

For an Example, down in Marthas Vineyard on a boat I used 4" yozuris and 5" martinetti, they seemed to like the bigger size jigs in deep water and the squids were also very large.

 

Last summer on the northshore, Small Yama****a jigs out caught all the big yozuris and martinettis by a longshot. On the Northshore they were feeding on juvenile herring and small shrimps.

 

For a setup, I used my light action Trout rod. It makes catching them alot of fun. A footlong would make the rod bend like crazy. The rig I use is a Hi-Lo rig. I tie multiple loops so I can adjust the jigs distance from the bottom. This makes my rig versatile so I can get my jig in strike zone.

 

The color of the jig can effect your catch rate also. I dont know why but theres days when orange and blue out catches pink and vice versa. My favorite color is pink, but it is a good idea to have a couple different colors.

 

Brands I like to use YoZuri, Martinetti, Yama****a and homemade ones. They all catch squid and prices vary. My favorite is Yama****a because of its quality. It has these wierd eyes on it and its wrapped in a glittery cloth. Also I prefer double row squid hooks on my jigs for better hook up.

 

Hope this gave you an idea on squid jigging

 

Tight Lines!!

IFTG

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Squid can be pickier than stripers at times. I have had several experiences where you could see schools of squid and they would show some interest in my offering then turn away. Sometimes its color but most of the time I've found, in my limited squidding experience, that changing the action and rigging made a bigger difference than changing color.

 

But just about everybody's favorite squid jig color is pink. All but a few of my jigs are pink. When the squid are biting pink seems to always out produce other colors.

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Like inforthegills said, on the Northshore it was smaller the better. I used 1 inch jigs with great success. I would catch with the larger ones until I bought some small ones but once I got the small ones, which were weighted, I started catching almost every cast. I used a high low for a while but never doubled up and actually caught more when I used just one at a time.


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Like inforthegills said, on the Northshore it was smaller the better. I used 1 inch jigs with great success. I would catch with the larger ones until I bought some small ones but once I got the small ones, which were weighted, I started catching almost every cast. I used a high low for a while but never doubled up and actually caught more when I used just one at a time.

 

Same here, I always used one jig on my rig. And like I said before making multiple loops on the rig, so you can get the jig 2 ft up to 4 ft off the bottom. Size, color, the way you jig, and distance from bottom can all make a picky squid strike.

 

From jigging all spring into summer Ive realized one thing (I like jigging under lights so you can see what your jig does and how squid attack it) Ive noticed squid dont attack the jig when your jigging, as soon as you stop they fly in, and then strike. So you when you think about it, constant jigging aint good. My approach is jig jig jig long pause jig jig jig...

 

By no way am I a Squid Scientist lol, but thats what worked for me. Give it a try

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During the season one can attach multiple jigs on line and use a small lead weight on the bottom . This allows you feel the bottom , but allows the jigs to act in a natural way . Rather then fast motion, just use a slow up and down motion , We have seen times with 4 or 5 jigs work great this way. Just make sure that the jig is being presented so it is straight out away from the main line with enough space in between each jig to still be able to cast it and bring it up all loaded to the platform you are fishing from.

 

Then again should you want to observe the attack of the squid a single jig works well. At time just sweeping the jig with the rod is all it takes to get a squid to come out of the shadows and munch down

Varing the jig motions along with the retrieve speed also has its moments.

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Same here, I always used one jig on my rig. And like I said before making multiple loops on the rig, so you can get the jig 2 ft up to 4 ft off the bottom. Size, color, the way you jig, and distance from bottom can all make a picky squid strike.

 

From jigging all spring into summer Ive realized one thing (I like jigging under lights so you can see what your jig does and how squid attack it) Ive noticed squid dont attack the jig when your jigging, as soon as you stop they fly in, and then strike. So you when you think about it, constant jigging aint good. My approach is jig jig jig long pause jig jig jig...

 

By no way am I a Squid Scientist lol, but thats what worked for me. Give it a try

 

Sounds like "deadsticking" when I'm ice fishing. I get hit on the pause more often. Small subtle movements in between.

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And if you head down to some well known spots in the state to our south when the squid are doing there thing, make sure you aren't scared of being surrounded by people that don't speak english. And I've seen people use squid snagging rigs when they are in thick, but it's really not worth it. It just scared the squid away if you don't get them. If everyone around you is catching on jigs, why the hell would you throw a snag rig? :confused:

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And if you head down to some well known spots in the state to our south when the squid are doing there thing, make sure you aren't scared of being surrounded by people that don't speak english. And I've seen people use squid snagging rigs when they are in thick, but it's really not worth it. It just scared the squid away if you don't get them. If everyone around you is catching on jigs, why the hell would you throw a snag rig? :confused:

 

Last season while squidding the North Shore, A guy came down throwing a cast net!! Ruined it for everyone there!!

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great info guys!!! man I love squid fishing!!!...seems those feathers on the side help a lot...



my tip where I fish is to find the edge on a channel ... they seem to love that slope!



can't wait for the first ones to get here.... whats the earliest you guys have taken them in the NE area?



always a good sign when the squid boats are in Hyannis!



Love when you get a Whiting that has a small squid in its' mouth!!!!   couldn't get a better meal...



WHITING and SQUID!!!    FRESH FROM THE N. ATLANTIC!!!!



 



<br />

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I've never actually gone squid fishing but used to catch them when I was fishing for flounder. I was using one of the flounder rigs with the fake squid on it along with some cut squid. I kept getting squid on it instead of flounder. This was in the summers in buzzard bay. 


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