Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Steve in Mass

So, Who Here Colors Easter Eggs?

Rate this topic

18 posts in this topic

Since we don't have kids, I myself have not done it since I was a kid. But I am sure that some of you must follow this Easter tradition.

 

So, what do you do? Sure, there s that Paas stuff and the vinegar and all that, I suppose by now there are other options, and then there is the old school dyes that use beet juice, onion skins, turmeric, green tea, and likely some other natural dyes.

 

So what is on the creative side of YOUR family?

 

Pictures welcomed.....:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I am a failure at all things arts and crafts.  I really wanted to tie flies, I worked very hard at it.  Fail.  Everything looks like either a clouser or a deciever.'



Eggs-I can get em a different color and thats about it.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

Originally Posted by skinnywater View Post

Not eggactly the same but here is a pic of a couple of my "easter egger" eggs from a couple of my hens. I have 3 that lay greenish-blue egg's.

1000



 



 



The positives of outsourcing!


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My grandmother's side of the family (Lithuanian) has a tradition of playing the "crack the egg" game. Not sure what the official name is, but it's played by holding a hard boiled easter egg in your hand with one of the ends pointing up. Then the other person holds their egg with an end pointing down and you crack them together. One egg will always break and the other egg usually stays intact. We just go around the room cracking eggs until only one egg is left with an end still intact, and they are the winner. Legend has it that my great uncle once destroyed everyone's egg one Easter, and was later found to have used a wooden egg.

 

As for coloring, I just use the Paas coloring kits because they are quick and easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My grandmother's side of the family (Lithuanian) has a tradition of playing the "crack the egg" game. Not sure what the official name is, but it's played by holding a hard boiled easter egg in your hand with one of the ends pointing up. Then the other person holds their egg with an end pointing down and you crack them together. One egg will always break and the other egg usually stays intact. We just go around the room cracking eggs until only one egg is left with an end still intact, and they are the winner. Legend has it that my great uncle once destroyed everyone's egg one Easter, and was later found to have used a wooden egg.

 

As for coloring, I just use the Paas coloring kits because they are quick and easy.

 

:laugh:

 

Always use the "pointed" side.....the more rounded side is where the air bubble resides, and that end will always crack more easily...........

 

 

As to the Paas coloring kits, do they still employ white vinegar, or have they moved beyond that by now?

 

I remember dropping little colored tablets into small bowls of heated white vinegar for the colorings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My grandmother's side of the family (Lithuanian) has a tradition of playing the "crack the egg" game. Not sure what the official name is, but it's played by holding a hard boiled easter egg in your hand with one of the ends pointing up. Then the other person holds their egg with an end pointing down and you crack them together. One egg will always break and the other egg usually stays intact. We just go around the room cracking eggs until only one egg is left with an end still intact, and they are the winner. Legend has it that my great uncle once destroyed everyone's egg one Easter, and was later found to have used a wooden egg.

 

As for coloring, I just use the Paas coloring kits because they are quick and easy.

 

 

 

Yup, my mother's family was Lithuanian as well and we ALWAYS did the Easter Egg competition!

We still do - even though she's long gone

 

 

:laugh:

 

As to the Paas coloring kits, do they still employ white vinegar, or have they moved beyond that by now?

 

I remember dropping little colored tablets into small bowls of heated white vinegar for the colorings.

 

 

I've never heard of Paas doing anything other than vinegar and those tablets are embedded in my family tradition and my brain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's fun to draw on the eggs with crayons before for dye them...fancy designs, faces, etc. The wax keeps the dye from getting to the shell...pretty cool.

 

Ahhh...the smashing of the eggs!

We used to take a toothpick and poke a small hole on either end and then blow the raw egg out...Voila! hollow Easter eggs.

When the day was done we'd smash them on each others heads (just the kids...kinda sounds like a Festivus thing now that I'm writing it down here)

This worked out fine until I smashed one real hard on my brother's head and someone had lost a toothpick inside of the egg...went all the way through my hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's fun to draw on the eggs with crayons before for dye them...fancy designs, faces, etc. The wax keeps the dye from getting to the shell...pretty cool.

 

 

Yup, we used to do that as well.....:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I posted a while back about silk tie tie dye. My lady found the idea somewhere googling. You wrap the egg in an old silk tie, and the pattern transfers to the egg in the boiling water. Pretty neat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used to do tons of the Paas eggs for egg hunts. After the hunt we would use them for egg tosses until they broke. The winner was the one who could catch one the farthest away without breaking it. One memorable year I sent my uncle deep for a long toss and threw him a colored, but uncooked egg. The big head start served me well as I was able to elude him and lock myself in a garage until he calmed down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.