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Want to get pi$$ed off watch this about mpg

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If youve ever watched Top Gear UK this comes up quite a bit. They even have a twin turbo Jaguar with 300 some odd hp which ended up getting over 60 miles to the gallon, not being driven conservatively. Heck, if we could get these cars I would have one in a heartbeat, with a truck next to it in the driveway for everything else. But going to class, work, grocery store, bank would cost next to nothing in a Bluemotion

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My sister sent this to me, it's been circulating in her car club. http://video.staged.com/localshops/vw_passat_785_mpg_in_the_uk

Pete

 

Ford Fiesta Diesel, 86 mpg, no US Sales.

 

Chevy Cruze Diesel, 50+ mpg, Europe only at this time.

 

Mazda 6 Diesel, 70+ mpg, no US Sales

 

Mazda CX-5, 60+ mpg no US Sales.

 

Honda Civic Diesel, 65+ mpg, Europe only.

 

Nissan Murano Diesel, 35+ mpg, no US Sales.

 

Nissan Evalia XE Diesel, 40+ mpg, no US Sales.

 

Smart Fortwo Diesel, 70+ mpg, no Us Sales.

 

Just ones I have heard about. The actual List of Diesel vehicles not able to be sold in the US is huge. Thank our .Gov...............:confused:

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Price of gas/diesel in much of Europe......3-4 times what we pay here. It sucks, but big oil and government are gonna get us one way or another!

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Yup, awesome proven diesel engines in everything. Rented a Peugot in UK last year with a lawnmower engine and it zipped. Particulate emissions are many times greater than what the EPA allows here. Still could be done. Demand is totally fuel economy driven there instead of lowest possible monthly payment. They also have a "carbon tax" on cars which can run into the thousands on even a small car if it is not highly efficient. Not a big fan of the idea but certainly encouraged manufacturers to get some small diesels on the road. It can lower the net cost versus a larger gas engine.  Beats the hell out of subsidies for efficiency.


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each side of the Atlantic came to the fork in the road regarding fuel economy and the thirst for petrol

 

Europe took the path for diesel and you see them everywhere, especially a country like Italy which has no oil except what it imports

 

But Europe chose that direction

 

The US took the other fork and went with electric hybrid and our pols legislated diesels becoming a non-option

 

Of course the Japanese are happy to oblige both alternatives

 

Detroit too, but Detroit has to keep it's diesels abroad

 

One of our members has a diesel VW Toureg SUV and swears by it getting high 20's mileage

 

Mercedes and BMW have them here too I believe

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You would be sick if you paid what we pay for diesel in the UK. You would have to be a millionaire to drive around in those huge pickups you have over there. A standard family car costs £80 ($120) to fill up with fuel. 60% of the cost is tax and duty. We also get charged tax on the car based on CO2 output of the engine, typically £170/year ($255) for an average car.

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God forbid we save some F'n money with the gas prices/taxes the way they are.. Over-inflated just like all the heads in Washington... Never trust them. When they tell you that the US has budgeted 50-60 million dollars for the war with iraq and a national actuality shows that they have already spent $1.7 TRILLION and climbing!!! Trust them??? I dont think so. Theyre all corrupt.

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The UK uses imperial gallons, which are 20% bigger than US gallons. Second, US emissions standards are tighter than EU standards. Third, the EU rating system is different than the EPA mileage rating system.

 

Not only is the EU test different, but it is very, very inflated. You won't get anywhere near the rated mileage on EU cars, while you will usually get near the EPA combined rating on US cars (with a diesel engine, you will probably be able to beat the EPA rating). Why is that? The EU testing allows the manufacturers to do things like adjust the brakes so that the pads are farther from the wheels, overinflate the tires, tape up seams around the doors and windows, etc. http://green.autoblog.com/2013/03/14/carmakers-taking-advantage-of-eu-fuel-economy-test-by-taping-up/

 

You can get up to 50 mpg in a VW diesel sold here in the US. Of course, the diesel engine isn't cheap, diesel fuel costs ~20% more than gasoline, and TDi's are in high demand. You can get a GTI with a gas engine near invoice price, but you'll pay list on a Golf TDI. As a result, the economics of the diesel may or may not work.

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I don't understand why so many of you believe that the American government is out to get us. There's not much to hide past national security, laws are created publicly and you can do research on your own to understand why things are going the way they are.

 

United States is no longer going to be dependent on other nations to import oil, price of natural gas and gasoline as well with various other petroleum based materials will start to fall in the upcoming years. We will becoming oil independent soon enough.

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Buddy of mine regularly gets over 65mpg with his Jetta TDI, with a piggyback programmer in "fuel economy mode", and his homemade bio diesel. He can make it from DC to Maine in one tank easily. His bio diesel ends up costing him about $0.70/ gallon to make too. After talking to him the other day I'm seriously considering putting a shed in my back yard for the bio diesel and getting a TDI

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