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R.R. Bridge Fisher

apple trees

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I just gave them a major prunning. when do i spray them with the dormant oil spray? then how often do i spray thru the season? i reall want apples this year i fertilized in the fall with metal rod around drip line poking holes into ground dropping in 5-10-5........

 

thanks apple growers

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I hope you are a nozzle head and don't mind spraying often if you want nice apples off your own trees. If you are willing to tolerate less than stellar apples then you can get away with fewer sprays.

 

You are going to need to spray roughly once a week, weather depending, through spring into summer with fungicidal protect-ants to keep scab and rust away besides the oil sprays to keep winter moth from getting into the emerging buds and coddling moth later in the season. If you want decent sized apples you can use chemical thinners to knock off blossoms or physically thin by hand. Not to mention keeping tracks of frosts to protect emerging buds. Depending on your location you may need to frost protect besides keep on top of sprays. If you are in a cold hollow you may need to protect. If you are on top of a hill or are on a hillside you may be okay.

 

If you are still interested I would get registered into a local pest forecast. Cornell and Maine offers forecasts and spray recommendations that a lot of local growers use to determine when to spray for pests and protect from frosts.

 

These are non commercial sites designed to aid fruit growers.

 

Cornell http://www.newa.cornell.edu/

 

Maine http://umaine.edu/ipm/programs/apple/newsletters/

 

Growing fruit is tough. Even the old low maintenance standbys like blueberries and raspberries are becoming more complicated with the new pests constantly coming in.

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I hope you are a nozzle head and don't mind spraying often if you want nice apples off your own trees. If you are willing to tolerate less than stellar apples then you can get away with fewer sprays.

 

You are going to need to spray roughly once a week, weather depending, through spring into summer with fungicidal protect-ants to keep scab and rust away besides the oil sprays to keep winter moth from getting into the emerging buds and coddling moth later in the season. If you want decent sized apples you can use chemical thinners to knock off blossoms or physically thin by hand. Not to mention keeping tracks of frosts to protect emerging buds. Depending on your location you may need to frost protect besides keep on top of sprays. If you are in a cold hollow you may need to protect. If you are on top of a hill or are on a hillside you may be okay.

 

If you are still interested I would get registered into a local pest forecast. Cornell and Maine offers forecasts and spray recommendations that a lot of local growers use to determine when to spray for pests and protect from frosts.

 

These are non commercial sites designed to aid fruit growers.

 

Cornell http://www.newa.cornell.edu/

 

Maine http://umaine.edu/ipm/programs/apple/newsletters/

 

Growing fruit is tough. Even the old low maintenance standbys like blueberries and raspberries are becoming more complicated with the new pests constantly coming in.

 

thank you for the info

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As a side note, if you are serious you may want to pick up a 2013 New England Tree Fruit Management guide. It is a single guide sponsored by all the states of New England's extensions services that goes into greater detail of yearly tasks, sprays, and how to use the forecasts.

 

Call Umass extension to get one.

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"Inherited" an orchard and vineyard (bought a country property) Everything had been neglected for a long time (the old man had passed years before) Only a few dwarf varieties... mature trees unattended are a magnet for every kind of blight, pest and malady known to man. Took me years to get things somewhat back in shape, but it was very gratifying.

 

2nd the extension service info. Bulletins, forecasts, etc. Don't overlook the commercial application guidelines though the quantities (and sometimes the concentrations) are way off for the home fruit production...you'll get good at math ;). Stick with WPs and spreader stickers...they go a lot further and are much more effective. You need to get friendly with a agricultural chemical supply house...it's generally the only place you'll find the chemicals the extension services recommend. Go to an orchard and ask them where they go. Also good to go in with others...a couple of pounds of WP goes a long way, but you'll pay a fraction of what you'd pay at a harry homeowner place and get much better stuff.

If you have modern resistant varieties you may get away with liquids...bush league if you're serious or have any significant issues.

BTW grapes and pears are a whole other can of worms (pardon the pun)...then you have to learn all about antibiotics too.

 

Once things were in shape and I got better versed and more in tune with all of this, I was able to cut way back on the application rates...timing's the key.

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Don't overlook the commercial application guidelines though the quantities (and sometimes the concentrations) are way off for the home fruit production...you'll get good at math ;). Stick with WPs and spreader stickers...they go a lot further and are much more effective. You need to get friendly with a agricultural chemical supply house...it's generally the only place you'll find the chemicals the extension services recommend. Go to an orchard and ask them where they go. Also good to go in with others...a couple of pounds of WP goes a long way, but you'll pay a fraction of what you'd pay at a harry homeowner place and get much better stuff.

 

Just a quick disclaimer. Be aware that once you start getting into the above you start getting into pesticide license and certification territory. Regulations are getting tighter and tighter and a lot of these supply houses can get in serious trouble if they get caught selling these formulations for licensed growers to unlicensed homeowners. You may be able to find a dealer that will "play ball" but don't be surprised if you don't. If you get caught you may be able to get away with playing "I didn't know I am just a stupid homeowner" but the dealer can't.

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Don't overlook the commercial application guidelines though the quantities (and sometimes the concentrations) are way off for the home fruit production...you'll get good at math ;). Stick with WPs and spreader stickers...they go a lot further and are much more effective. You need to get friendly with a agricultural chemical supply house...it's generally the only place you'll find the chemicals the extension services recommend. Go to an orchard and ask them where they go. Also good to go in with others...a couple of pounds of WP goes a long way, but you'll pay a fraction of what you'd pay at a harry homeowner place and get much better stuff.

 

Just a quick disclaimer. Be aware that once you start getting into the above you start getting into pesticide license and certification territory. Regulations are getting tighter and tighter and a lot of these supply houses can get in serious trouble if they get caught selling these formulations for licensed growers to unlicensed homeowners. You may be able to find a dealer that will "play ball" but don't be surprised if you don't. If you get caught you may be able to get away with playing "I didn't know I am just a stupid homeowner" but the dealer can't.

 

This is all quite correct...

 

It's been a while since I had this property...haven't had the need since.

Boy...things sure have tightened up (unless you have your hands/dollars in the right pockets...read "Monsanto Protection Act" in today's news)

 

I just googled a couple of the old standbys...these used to be part of a "standard" orchard mix (recommended by the extension services) and indeed they are now either banned or highly regulated...

I think that the extension services where you are should have good recommendations for products that are "readily" available.

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"If you are willing to tolerate less than stellar apples then you can get away with fewer sprays." Important words. I have 3 full -sized trees that were on the property when we bought in 1981. So it's no orchard. But doing a lot of spraying resulted in way, way more apples than we could eat and freeze and use. A lot less spraying, sometimes none, still results in enough apples for pies and snacks and applesauce without me worrying about what all besides me and my family are getting poisoned. Early season sprays seem to be more important in my area (SW CT).

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BTW, you did remember to have the right X-Pollinator for your type so they will bare Fruit, right?

 

Most Trees need an Oddball for that unless they're self Pollinating.

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good luck. I have given up. too frustrating. Grew them for years but as mentioned above the pest have really increased in my area. Between the low pollination and late spring frosts the last decade. Bees are not real abundant in my area , the winter moths, gypsy moths, tent caterpillars, and darn plum curculio beetle's. Oh yeah and the giant yellow jackets that get in there and eat the whole friggin apple a week or so before you are going to harvest..I just go out and buy them. Don't get me wrong I luved the process but the reward just isn't there anymore. I concentrate on my blueberries now. Just cut 2 apple trees down this year as a matter of fact. Hurt to do so but it keeps me from wasting my time pruning them. Good luck. You got some good advise above. Paul

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I found one by chance about 8yrs ago at my BIL's place back in the wood's, a whip at best with a 3/4'' caliper .I dug it up and put it in the front yard and left it alone til this past year when i lopped it back really hard. It now has a 8'' caliper and  spit load of buds and i might have some applesauce in my future. I don't know what variety it is.

 


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Sooooo quick question since we are on this topic.  I have done some research with wide variety of results.  Just planted two apple trees.  Both are 2 years old and small.  I have been told to expect fruit in 5-7 year range.  When is it important to start spraying?


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Now...only probably not as often.

Modern varieties are less susceptible to the maladies that affect fruit trees but you don't want that stuff to get established.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jrhjr View Post

Now...only probably not as often.

Modern varieties are less susceptible to the maladies that affect fruit trees but you don't want that stuff to get established.



Thanks.  Just got a concentrate and will spray tomorrow. 


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