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Bryan G

Bluefish

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Hi fellas just another question from down under. The fish we call Tailor are said to be the same species as your Bluefish.

 

Our Tailor spawn midway up the coast of Aus around October and the very young can be caught in some of our southern rivers most of the year.

 

Do you have any evidence of this patten happening in the US or are you getting our mature fish over there.

 

There has been various theories tossed about by fishermen in my younger days and I would like to hear your side if you don't mind.

 

Bryan

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From wiki

 

The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only extant species of the Pomatomidae family. It is a marine pelagic fish found around the world in temperate and sub-tropical waters, except for the Northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia,[1]shad on the east coast of South Africa, elf on the west coast, lüfer[2] in Turkey, and similarly, луфарь/lufar in Russian. Other common names are blue, chopper, and anchoa.[3] It is good eating and a popular gamefish.

 

The bluefish is a moderately proportioned fish, with a broad, forked tail. The spiny first dorsal fin is normally folded back in a groove, as are its pectoral fins. Coloration is a grayish blue-green dorsally, fading to white on the lower sides and belly. Its single row of teeth in each jaw are uniform in size, knife-edged and sharp. Bluefish commonly range in size from seven-inch (18-cm) "snappers" to much larger, sometimes weighing as much as 40 pounds (18 kg), though fish heavier than 20 pounds (9 kg) are exceptional.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mofish View Post

From wiki

The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only extant species of the Pomatomidae family. It is a marine pelagic fish found around the world in temperate and sub-tropical waters, except for the Northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia,[1]shad on the east coast of South Africa, elf on the west coast, lüfer[2] in Turkey, and similarly, луфарь/lufar in Russian. Other common names are blue, chopper, and anchoa.[3] It is good eating and a popular gamefish.

 



 



Haha.  Who wrote that?  I don't know how they taste when they're anywhere else, but NJ bluefish are fit for bait and not much else.  Good eating. LOL.


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Tailor are the same as bluefish for sure. We also have spawns of bluefish and the small ones (we call them snappers) can be found in the rivers and estuaries. If I remember right bluefish in the US spawn in June and July, which is our late spring/early summer, so about the same time seasonally as October in Australia right?

 

Was that the question? Just wanted to be sure.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Henrymski View Post


 



Haha.  Who wrote that?  I don't know how they taste when they're anywhere else, but NJ bluefish are fit for bait and not much else.  Good eating. LOL.





 



Lots of people eat blues.  Not me, but they're out there.


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Yes, they certainly are the same species. They go by other common names in different places as well.  The eastern North American populations run  from at least  Florida to Nova Scotia. They spawn spring and early summer... June, July... I don't know specifics about that though. We get all sizes here from 4" "snappers" to 15# "gorillas". The snappers can usually be found in tidal rivers in late summer and early fall. They are also plentiful on open beaches, but the majority of mature fish from 14" to 36" give or take, are caught in open water or from the  shoreline. They will go up rivers to feed but they are so plentiful in the more accessible shore locations that I don't know anyone who targets them too far inland in rivers as a preference.I am pretty far north so by January they are gone and we don't see them in numbers until June.



I don't  think we are getting your fish here but maybe someone knows better than me. Either way, fun to fish for with topwater plugs.


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Here is more info from NOAA

 

Atlantic coast, bluefish are found from Maine to Florida and mix extensively during seasonal coastal migrations (Figure 25.1). During winter, large bluefish tend to remain in the Middle Atlantic Bight, moving south to North Carolina by March. Small fish move farther south in winter with some fish wintering off the coast of Florida. As water temperatures increase, the spring migration north begins and spawning occurs in the South Atlantic Bight at this time. By summer, bluefish move north into the Middle Atlantic Bight, although some medium size fish may remain off Florida (Shepherd et al. 2006). A second spawning occurs in the offshore waters of the Middle Atlantic Bight during summer.

 

The result of these two spawning events is the appearance of two distinct size groups of juvenile bluefish during autumn; a spring spawned cohort having fish about 15-25 cm in length and a summer spawned cohort having fish about 4-14 cm in length (Able and Fahay 1998). Fish from the two spawning cohorts mix extensively during the year and constitute a single genetic stock (Graves et al. 1992). Bluefish are voracious predators, feeding primarily on squid and fish, particularly menhaden and smaller fish such as silversides (Buckel et al. 1999, Fahay et al. 1999).

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Haha.  Who wrote that?  I don't know how they taste when they're anywhere else, but NJ bluefish are fit for bait and not much else.  Good eating. LOL.

 

My mother makes a good bluefish patty. It's a Cambodian dish. I can only have it a few times before I get sick of that bluefish taste.

 

I hear smoked bluefish is all the rage :D

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Here's a good bluefish recipe which an old salt old me about when I was a kid; take two bluefish filets and place them overnight in the fridge in a bowl of milk, remove the filets and pat them dry with a paper towel. Rub some kosher salt and lemon pepper onto the filets and place them in a brown paper bag. Pour two tablespoonfuls of olive oil onto the top of the bag and use your finger tips to spread the oil over the surface of the bag. Place the bag with the filets inside onto a cookie sheet and bake for 50 minutes @ 375*. When the timer goes off remove the bag from the oven, remove the filets from the bag, throw the filets into the garbage and eat the bag. ;)

 

Valentine

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I personally love filetting bluefish immediately upon capture before the meat becomes oily. I don't mean put on ice, or allow it to bleed out, but within minutes, kill, filet and put on ice. The meat is incredible

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My mother makes a good bluefish patty. It's a Cambodian dish. I can only have it a few times before I get sick of that bluefish taste.

 

I hear smoked bluefish is all the rage :D

Anything Smoked is Good! But I'm not a fan of bluefish.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by valentine View Post

Here's a good bluefish recipe which an old salt old me about when I was a kid; take two bluefish filets and place them overnight in the fridge in a bowl of milk, remove the filets and pat them dry with a paper towel. Rub some kosher salt and lemon pepper onto the filets and place them in a brown paper bag. Pour two tablespoonfuls of olive oil onto the top of the bag and use your finger tips to spread the oil over the surface of the bag. Place the bag with the filets inside onto a cookie sheet and bake for 50 minutes @ 375*. When the timer goes off remove the bag from the oven, remove the filets from the bag, throw the filets into the garbage and eat the bag. wink.gif

Valentine



Ha ha. I use a similar recipe.  I do the milk thing but I lay thin slices of lemon across the fillet instead of the lemon pepper.  I use salt/pepper and sometimes diced tomatoes and fresh thyme sprigs.  Then I seal each fillet inside parchment paper and into the oven.  I do this with snapper fillets though not adult blues.  Comes out great.    


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I personally love filetting bluefish immediately upon capture before the meat becomes oily. I don't mean put on ice, or allow it to bleed out, but within minutes, kill, filet and put on ice. The meat is incredible

 

Yep, this man knows what he's talking about.

Love fresh blue fish wrapped in tin foil with lemon, onion, lots of butter and pepper. Grill it for 30+ mins and get ready for the best breakfast on the beach. That's what I used to enjoy the most fishing the south side of Montauk. After a morning bout with them, then drag a couple to my buddy's trailer in Hither Hills camp ground and get ready for the tasty breakfast of fresh blue fish.

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I most say it realy depends on whos cooking the blue fish. I'm not and lover of blues on the table.But early spring 1-3 lbs or for bigger gut hooked blues ,when the red meat is cut away. the white meat makes an fine meal. and I'm no cheif at all but can cook good enougth to servive. Had an afican friend few yrs back that cooked an blue I gave Him.and i could not beleive it was blue fish awesome tasting . So it realy depends on who cooks the food for you.

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