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ScottO

Yes, a re-hash of sharpeners

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Do i want to go with water or oils for stones and why? I know different stones for different applications but do I go oil system or water system? Scott

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personally, I like water - oil always seems to leave a sticky film on the stones which builds up over time into a real gunky mess. also, despite the alleged polishing abilities of the slurry, I almost always use the stones in the sink, sometimes even under running water, so i don't end up with that black stuff spattered all over the place.

 

i've seen it said an advertised that natural arkansas stones won't work with water. this isn't true, and even though they may already be impregnated with a natural oil of sorts, they work just fine with water - it might not soak in the same, but it works just fine doing what the liquid is there to do in the first place - carry filings and other material away so it doesn't clog up the stone.

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the set i am looking at has stones that are stated "made for oil" vs the same set as water stones...at double the price. Just wondering what would happen using made for oil stones in water?

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My $.02 – As EB eluded, the use of abrasives is a cutting, or chip removal process. Albeit ultra-fine, the mechanics of the process is the same as for a file or the cutter teeth on a milling machine. That said, it’s important to keep your cutting media as clean as possible in order to be as efficient as possible.

 

Regardless of the surfactant (water, oil, detergent), your stones should never get loaded up. If they are all grey and smooth/shiny in the high use areas, you’re doing it wrong. You’ve got to let the media do its job. The job of the water or oil is to suspend and clear away whatever it is you’re cutting. In this case, steels.

 

So let’s talk about steel – High nickel steels are desirable, but there are stainless steels out there that are low nickel alloys and will gum-up a stone as quickly as a piece of aluminum. Anyone here who has a boat and has stripped the heads on cheap SST fasteners knows what I’m talking about.

 

Oil is tricky. Remember, the primary purpose is to flush, not lubricate. You want to encourage friction, not mitigate it. So go light. WD-40 and other penetrating oils are great. But to keep it in perspective hydraulic oil is even too heavy.

 

If you’re using water, even on an ultra-fine stone like an Arkansas stone and you’re seeing that gray build-up, fill a bowl with water and add a few drops of dish detergent. Dip your blade and/or stone frequently to keep the filings suspended and flushed. That should keep your stone clean and unloaded.

 

Lastly, when you want a super sharp edge, leave your Magilla Gorilla hand strength in the other room. Pushing hard on the blade in an attempt to sharpen a blade more quickly distorts the fine edge and you’re chasing it into a hole. Light hands and just a tiny amount of patience will give you a sharper, more durable edge without a lot of extra effort.

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the set i am looking at has stones that are stated "made for oil" vs the same set as water stones...at double the price. Just wondering what would happen using made for oil stones in water?

 

The worst thing is that they'll load up - nothing detrimental will happen to the stone nless you just keep diggin into the loaded up stone - in that case the stone will eventually wear unevenly and you'll never be able to use it on much more than an axe.

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Scary Sharp

Sandpaper gets full, throw it out start with a fresh one

No dishing of the stone, no worrying about flattening.

No oil

No mess

Easy peasy lemon squeezy

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Thanks guys, understand the whole suspended medium and keeping the sotnes flushed out etc etc etc I guess I was looking for the "an oil set will work with water no problem" statement. I have many knives from 20 year old wustoff's to 50 year old dexters. I will practice a bit first but thanks for all the advice guys.

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Scary Sharp

Sandpaper gets full, throw it out start with a fresh one

No dishing of the stone, no worrying about flattening.

No oil

No mess

Easy peasy lemon squeezy

 

:th: :th: That too! 400 to 600 wet paper on a lap table is probably the bestest of all....~!

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I take it down to 1500 grit

Have a few 8" x 10" squares of heavy plate glass, spray glue the paper to them.

Then hone it on a wood mounted leather strop to remove the last vestige of a burr

 

Use a steel to keep the edge straight

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1000

 

Ok gents. what is your thoughts on this tool - snobbery aside.

 

 

I have sharpening stones with mineral oil at home, but I got this with a knife set I picked up for my competition trailer (I assume anything I take with me might walk away, even by accident).

 

 

I don't have the time or desire to sharpen knives with the detail you gents have. There is a knife guy at the comps so I have him do my knives at least once a year. I was a bit skeptical using the diamond sharpening tool, but I admit I cannot tell the difference between when I use my stones or using this tool. I hone with a steel often.

 

A knife dealer showed me how to use it and said it does a great job, but then again, he too had a diamond sharpening tool in his inventory for sale.

 

 

Pedestrian are always commenting on how sharp my knives are when they see me slice in a single pass, but most folks have very very dull knives in their homes.

 

So am I doing damage to my knives or will this tool do for short notice quick on-site knife sharpening?

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I have several of these diamond hones...just be gentle.

A Jewelstick...a Dexter...several Smiths...

I like the 10 or 12" ones in the kitchen.

For the car and the tackle box, I like these...very compact.

 

1000

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NS Mike D View Post

1000

Ok gents. what is your thoughts on this tool - snobbery aside.

I have sharpening stones with mineral oil at home, but I got this with a knife set I picked up for my competition trailer (I assume anything I take with me might walk away, even by accident).

I don't have the time or desire to sharpen knives with the detail you gents have. There is a knife guy at the comps so I have him do my knives at least once a year. I was a bit skeptical using the diamond sharpening tool, but I admit I cannot tell the difference between when I use my stones or using this tool. I hone with a steel often.

A knife dealer showed me how to use it and said it does a great job, but then again, he too had a diamond sharpening tool in his inventory for sale.

Pedestrian are always commenting on how sharp my knives are when they see me slice in a single pass, but most folks have very very dull knives in their homes.

So am I doing damage to my knives or will this tool do for short notice quick on-site knife sharpening?



I had one or 2 of those things.Not real impressed.


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1000

 

Ok gents. what is your thoughts on this tool - ?

 

I have a couple - As with all tools, it's a matter of the quality. I have a mid-range quality knife (block) set and it has one which works fine in a pinch, I have another that a friend of mine gave me when he closed down a restaurant - I don't know the brand but it's head-and-shoulders above the other - You can feel the difference when using it - the cheaper one feels like it's sliding over the sharpener, while the older prof one feels like it's grabbing ever so slightly and it puts one helluva'n edge on a carving knife.

 

I have 2 Smith's Diamond hones, a 6" at home and a 12" on the boat for sharpening filleting knives - they work great if you use a gentle hand with them - just like with a stone, if you're pushing too hard, trying to do the work 'for' the stone, you're likely deflecting the edge and just chasing that dull blade around.

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I have a $35 diamond home from a restaurant supply and I love it. I think it may be wearing out as I've had it for a long time.

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