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caosesvida

fishing from kayak

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I never caught a fish from a kayak yet, If you hook into a good size fish, won't it pull you quite a ways? Or do they mostly go deep. Is it hard to keep balance/ I know on the surf a good size striper can put a lot of force on the rod, and your on solid ground> thanks for the all the response on the other question.

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If the fish is that big you can just point the rod at it and tighten down the drag. A lesser measure would be to throw out your drift sock. We haven't lost anyone to a fish yet that I know of.

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I've pulled in Blue fish and Bass nothing to it like KEN l said just point your rod at it. Its fun being turned around by a fish but your not going to be pulled out to sea.

 

Eddie

 

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GoneFlyFishing33.jpg

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BB, aren't you a big guy? What about the micro fellas like me? I'd love to hook a fourty plus, but I have enough trouble keeping my feet planted firmly on terra firma to risk a burrial at seawink.giftongue.gif

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Caosevida

This is one of my biggest fish I caught in open water this past year was around 43 inches.This fish towed me around pretty good even with my drift sock.I usally use the sock just to keep me closer to were the fish are .By that I mean once you fight & land a fish & drift aways you could be 100-200 yds away from the spot .So the sock helps keep you closer to the fish and gives you more time fishing less time paddling.

 

JimW and I got into some 12-15 pd bluefish one day in 2-3 foot seas and that was pretty hairy since them big blues put up one hek of a battle yak side.It was a little iffy till the wind quit.Some times though you will get dragged or drift into a hairy spot when battling large fish and you just got to fight your way out either by doing the one arm paddle or throwing the rod back into the holder.Its alot of fun and pretty exciting.

joe43basscrop1.jpg

Pics of blues were taken after it had calmed down

jimwwhblue2crop2.jpg

JoeBlue113crop.jpg

Once you do it a few times you get used to the battle yak side till you get your total sense of balance I would keep the drag on the easy side.If your line snaps or the hook pulls when you are into a bigger fish the sudden release could make you go over the other way.Just something thats almost happened to me a few times.Gets your heart pounding a little more.Same thing goes for hoisting a big fish out of the water.You dont feel the weight till you get it out.

 

Hopefully the pics get you stoked up a bit

 

JoeV

 

 

 

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Always Wishin I Was Yak Fishin

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there's nothing like a blue fish sleigh ride

as for being pulled out to sea just bring along an unbrella to coast back in and remember to trollcwm12.gif

 

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BluesCruiser~~~<*)))><}

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Spencer Tracy in "Old Man and the Sea"smile.gif

 

First fish I ever caught in a yak was only about 5 pounds(Blue).

I knew I was being pulled a bit but by the time I landed him(her?)I was about 50 yards from where I had started.

 

I've yet to hear of anyone getting pulled out to sea...........

I tend to fish bays/sound areas and have never ventured into the ocean with my boat.

 

Kayak surfing is another story smile.gif though!

THAT is FUN!!!! and my head goes like this in big waves cwm12.gif

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Having been pulled farther offshore than I actually wanted to be (hence the username), I can say you should just bring a compass or GPS unit.

 

I've never been pulled completely out of view of land but it certainly could happen. Be prepared.

 

The good news is that most Northeast fish won't do that to you, unless you hook a fair sized shark.

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Get a rudder and you can literally steer the fish away from the open ocean. Don't worry, they tire pretty fast, even the big gals.

 

It won't take much time in the ocean or bay to develop your sea butt. It involves the compensating movement, mostly lateral, of your body over and around your center of gravity (see sea butt) to stabilize your bobbing yak. Once you have your sea butt down there's little a fish, even a big one, can do to overturn you. If you're stil l concerned:

 

- get a wide body yak with a flat bottom. They're more stable and better to learn in anyway.

- as already noted, watch out when they're hard on the side. When they see the yak, they will tend to sound and can pull you over if the drag is set to tight. Set it loose and lean the other way.

- But not to far. Never had the line break close in but could happen and you will counter rotate into the drink. This balance stuff is what makes it fun.

- Don't twist your body to follow the fish to the stern. I get very unstable when I face backwards. Don't quite know why.

 

Get out there and get wet.

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I remember reading in The Perfect Storm about the guys in the whaling Dories out of New Bedford who drifted or were pulled too far away from thier mother ship. Many were left at sea and some were picked up by Portugese Fishermen. All were given up for dead but some made it back as much as two years later.

Imagine someone who everybody had thought gone for good walking down the street with no warning to anyone. It apparently happened more than once.

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I would worry more about capsizing than being towed very far. It can happen when a fish hits, don't ask how I know. Start close to shore and work your way into the sport, it's alot of fun if you take safety seriously.

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