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Chesapeake Tube and Worm

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OK, somebody out there has got to have used the tube and worm in the Chesapeake. Right!? Kyrn13 recently said he got puzzled looks at bait and tackle shops when bringing up sandworms. I have had the same question as he did about using bloodworms instead of sandworms. I'm certainly going to give it a try this fall season. The only time I've seen sandworms around here was during a bloodworm shortage years ago.

 

I know when fishing is good, (catching scenario), it is no real issue. But can the T&W be that go to lure in the Chesapeake tipped with bloodworm the same way it is further north tipped with sandworm?

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I still don't know the answer to this question. I've tried dragging a tube only 3 times now. Once without any dressing, once with Berkley sandworms (plastic) and once with bloodworms. Nothing.

 

I've been using jigs, teasers and plugs with more success.

 

I know there are eels in the Bay...but I don't have a good sense for their lifecycle, size, coloration, etc. I keep wondering if the tubes I'm using are too large, the wrong color, etc.

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JoeV and Dougie used Tube 'n Worms with sandworms on the Susky Flats this past Spring. They said the weather was rough and they were the only ones catching fish. They brought the worms with them from CT.

 

I've never used the rig without sandworms so I can't comment on other baits. It works really well with sandworms. Some of the guys we fish with can't believe how effective it is.

 

I plan on fishing with Bay Paddlers next March in the Chesapeak and I'm deinitely bringing sandworms with me for my tubes.

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My impression of what I've gleened from different posts is that the tube and worm is the fly fishers version of the surgical hose eel. Also I think it may match the hatch further north, so to speak, of eels or sandworms when their newborns proliferate. Would someone who knows please educate me about this?

 

I wonder if the Chesapeake ecosystem is different in that the tube and worm would not really be representing the same thing it does further north.

 

Like on land, it would seem to provide a tantilizing appeal to any predator to see a fresh and vulnerable juvenile on the menu at any time. Could this be part of it's appeal to stripers?

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My impression of what I've gleened from different posts is that the tube and worm is the fly fishers version of the surgical hose eel.

 

Not even close...its a red tube with a swivel in front, a hook in the back to hand a real sandworm on and a drail or plastic type rudder in front. Not for fly rodding at all.

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tube n worm will not be effective on the c. bay during spot and croaker season becouse bloodworm is the #1 bait for them. Before any hook up you will be out of bait/dollars. It's best to drift a live spot and have a better success, it works for me. Live spot in the fall is the one for me......flounder,rockfish,trout,red drum and blues.

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gentlemen please let us join hands and recognize the teachings of all that is tubey. one cannot have a paddle without the power of the tube. what it matches is not of any importance, all fish eat all tubes all the time and that is all ye need to know. yes, bass really crush it, blues, well you know how selective they can be, the elusive lizardfish? ohhh yes. none can resist the lure of its wormy goodness. do not question the integrity of the tube for the tube catches all and all catches on the tube are tubetastic. maybe you just arent paddling enough. may i suggest a demo. amen

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one cannot reach tubular zen without standing on that wall, fish busting just out of range, faced with the realization that you have no meaty clue how to get at them fish after the sun goes down, when there arent headache birds giving away their 20 and you better get youseff a paddle and you better yak yak yak with birds of a feather in all sorts of sunny weather from baja to bangcock, and always together. when you reach bangcock you will know you have arrived there. let the tubes show us the way icon14.gif

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ozlamabad,issy and otty- you guys are the best fisherman online keep it up. oh! i'm yakfishing tonight on the mouth of potomac river maybe you can teach me how to fished this area as well.

sayunara my three amigos.....

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this really has nothing to do with you pinhead, or anyone else for that matter, being an extremely neutral 3rd paddler on this one. the thread has been jacked, what you do with it from here is up to you. i choose to hazaah because these branch dividians need a janet reno, and for lack of a better term, i am janet reno.

 

 

theres no need to use name calling when referring to oznervard, nor become unwelcoming or non-communal. thats how you will get laundry on the field from the 'umble host which will result in yardage marched off in your direction. trust me on that one. and i am not about to tell you how to "fished this area" any sooner than you are going to begin communicating above 3rd grade level because neither one of us has been in that situation im guessing. now lets try to let level tubes prevail and have a nice paddle on this one. good day sir cwm13.gif

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Okay, okay I guess I may as well throw my 2 cents in too. Surgical hose has been used on the Chesapeake for years. I can't say before I was born but probably. I wasn't around. But sandworms on the end is just something unheard of. They aren't sold here at bait shops. That doesn't mean there isn't a type of sandworm or something similar in the Chesapeake because there are. Numerous varieties. They just aren't commercially profitable because there is no demand for them.

 

Last month I headed over to Ocean City to fish for some flounder with my son. I stopped at Anglers to get some minnows. They were out and suggested that I stop on Kent Island at Island Hunting and Fishing which I did. To my surprise they had sandworms and another variety of non typical worms(not blood worms not night crawlers not nuclear worms)but I took only minor interest.

 

We were targeting flounder so we passed on the worms. Went down to the Sinepuxent and had one of the slowest days I can remember we saw 2 croaker caught all day. (one was mine). Drifting in the bay I noticed a pink worm floating by. I researched later it was called a bristle worm. That's how I found out about the numerous varieties of worms living in the Chesapeake. Anyway one worm is a curiousity, however when we started to leave and paddled back to our put in spot, we saw literally thousands of these worms swimming everywhere. People in boats and canoes were stopping just to stare because no one present had ever seen anything like it. If I would have seen these at the start that is what I would have used for bait. The fish must have been gorging themselves on these worms. They were everywhere.

 

That would have been an ideal time to try a tube and worm. Granted that was a coastal bay and not the Chesapeake. Which is the suject of this post, but when I researched the worms I had seen, everything I read said they are present in the Chesapeake Bay. If they are there bet your life a fish is eating them.

 

I haven't been back there but the next time I pass through Kent Island I intend to stop at Island Hunting and Fishing to see if they carry those worms on a regular basis. I would like to troll some around Eastern Bay. Was it coincidence or was it just a certain time of year they sell them because of the hatch?

 

TDog

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