Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
h2oboss

Fish mortality and Kayaks

31 posts in this topic

Fish mortality and 'yaks...First let me state that I have never fished from a kayak (canoe/ small boat yes but never a kayak) so I am going on your opinions.........not trying to start a war here but do you guys feel that larger fish (escpecially stripers) have a higher mortaity rate after being released from a 'yak rather than standard catch/release from boat or shore?....My reasoning/thought behind this is that a larger fish will tow a kayak, which may deplete it's energy reserve more than a normal fight leaving it suseptable to predation and disease?.....I am looking into getting a 'yak and have nothing against it! It is just a thought!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not at all. Because a fish drags the yak it is whipped faster and this is better for the fish. Also its much easier to revive a fish from a kayak. Just have a boga or lip gripper on the fish and wave it back and forth. Its light tackle and keeping a fish out of water that causes mortality. While you're getting your tools together you can keep the fish in the water. Something you can't easily do from either shore or a boat.

 

------------------

baja55@optonline.net

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 08-14-2002).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes me less time to land a fish on the yak then it does from a boat or shore(on lighter tackle).I think it takes a little less time because you actually can real in the yak up to the fish.The biggest problem most of us have is getting the fish up to the yak with to much fight in it.

I also use a lip gripper.The fish never leaves the water.Never gets dragged up on the sand or rocks.Never gets scraped up from a net.Never hits the deck of a boat and beats the hell out of itself.If anything fishing from the yak is "less" stressful to the fish.

Doug M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We don't have the numbers to support an opinion either way. My guess is that mortality is not much different for yak releses and probably much more dependent on temps and how the fish is handled, ie you can release them from yak without even taking them from the water as opposed to dragging them up on the sand and kicking them back into the surf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All very valid points that I had not thought of. Unexpectedly civil as wellbiggrin.gif I saw a guy in a Kayak at IRI Deleware just north of the north jetty, in this little eddy created by the jetty.....he was nailing fish, I want one but constricted by $$ and am a little hesitant about the flipping over part. Anyway, thanks for the imput and Go Get'm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My drag isn't set any differently from the yak than on sand so I have to think that getting towed with less of a zing on the drag is probably more gentle than the same hard runoff from the beach. Mabye not so many violent stops and starts?

 

This is kinda like that question if you were in a falling elevator and jumped just before it hit bottom would you get hurt? wink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fish never leaves the water.Never gets dragged up on the sand or rocks.Never gets scraped up from a net.Never hits the deck of a boat and beats the hell out of itself.If anything fishing from the yak is "less" stressful to the fish.

Doug M

 

I agree with Doug...Also when you are down at water level you can grab the fish by the tail and move him through the water until he takes off under his own power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In all honesty, yes and no. Some problems are eliminated like sand in the gills. On the yak you meet half way as opposed to dragging the fish to you. The amount of pressure to tow a yak is not all that much. So in the normal course of fish fighting, I'd call it a draw or less taxing by the yak. However, the bad part is, I admittedly(not proudly) will "play" a fish a little more on the yak. This really pertains mostly to bluefish. I prefer a bluefish get on the yak with a little less fight in him than I would deal with on a beach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think about it this way. Assuming a large striper is taking a kayak for a ride, did you ever see a fish dragging around a jetty or a dock or an island? It's the old immovable object theory. That has to take more of a toll on the fish. Then again a release is a release and I don't believe the fish suffers permanent damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oz,

I think you are right about playing out fish more, hard to handle anything too green from the yak. I think we all run bluefish down a bit more, probably even if we aren't in yaks. You see people watching them flap all over the bottom of a boat or on a beach all the time. Blues just don't know how to quit.

In a yak at least they spend that time flappin in the water alongside not hitting much, and as soon as I figure how to get a hold of them they are gone. I figured them for survivors but no stats, is there a high mortality rate for c/r bluefish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your drag is set for 10 lbs for arguement sake, won't the fish only pull the kayak after it pulls some percentage of the 10 lbs. of pressure off the drag and the remainder of the 10 lbs accounted for by the kayak? Isn't 10 lbs of pressure 10 lbs of pressure no matter how it is divided? I guess maybe not since there is momentum to be accounted for, which can't be good, cause I would rather have 1 drag than 2. Don't you pop fish if it the fish turns and the drag on the reel has to make up for the sudden difference?

 

Charlie

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charlie,

 

I think the max pressure against the fish is roguhly 10#. You are tethered to the fish with a line that will only take 10# before the drag slips. I'm sure there are scenarios that momentarilly allow it to be greater than 10#s, but 10 is the guess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats what I thought Oz. Then how does 10 lbs from a kayak wear a fish down quicker than 10 lbs from a rock. I am having a hard time understanding how a kayak whips a fish quicker.

 

Charlie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.