Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CreekFisher

SOT Hull Durability???

9 posts in this topic

Hello,

 

I'm looking to buy a fishing yak. I live close to several small streams that are loaded with smallmouth bass. These streams have riffles every 100 yards or so. Any boat that goes through these streams will drag bottom at least four times per fishing trip maybe up to 15 times per trip(dependent upon water level).

 

My local shop sells Dagger kayaks. The owner says that Dagger's hulls are more duable than other kayak's hulls. Is there any truth to his comment?

 

I'm 6' tall, weigh 210 pounds, and my inseam is 30". I'm looking for a fish'n yak that will allow me to easily manuever through these small streams. The streams are fairly slow moving, have some flat water, and have some tiny riffle-type rapids that don't exceed class II when flooded. All of the streams are fairly well guarded from wind. My plan is to wade up-stream with the yak in-tow. Then, when I'm finished fishing, I'll hop on the yak and paddle down-stream back to my car.

 

I have been looking at yaks and I like how the Cobra Explorer and Navigator look. I'm just concerned that due to their light weight that there might not be enough plastic in the hull to provide good durability. I'm aware that polyethylene is available in many densities and that high-density poly is more durable than low-density poly. Maybe the lighter Cobra yak is as durable or more durable than a heavier yak?

 

My closest Cobra dealer is 75 minutes away and has one Explorer to demo (without a backrest!!!). My closest Ocean Kayak dealer is 2.5 hours away.

 

Maybe I should just get a rec yak? Can you tell that I'm confused? icon20.gifonfused:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekfisher I have a Pungo sit in inside I am 6ft 250 got a couple pds on ya and still can go thru 3-4 inches of water if i do get stuck i just place my hands outside in water and lift myself free its easy and as far as the hull all the rocks and gravek have only made small scratches on it quit wishin go yak fishin joev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i just recently picked up a Cobra Explorer and i love it. i got the Surf to Summit fishing seat with two rodholders and got a plano dry box for the well in the back and this setup work well fro me. easy to paddle, relatively stable and pretty quick and manuverable. for the price i'd say it's a pretty good yak. the sit on tops are easy to get in and out of and nice if you want to dip your feet in in the summer. also if you do run into trouble you don't have to learn the Eskimo roll to right yourself and get back on. JonS on the board sells and rigs Cobra Kayaks and has some to demo at a local lake near his house. you should drop him a private message and see how he can set you up for the kind of fishing you would like to do. Good luck and let us know how you make out.

 

------------------

<A HREF="mailto:

metzpetit@aol.com

"]

metzpetit@aol.com

</A>

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekfisher,

 

Welcome to the board. You have many choices since you're inland and don't have rough waters like surf to contend with. In your situation I would still prefer a SOT over a deck boat (the type you sit in). The reason is if you're getting in and out alot the SOT is easier. Any yak will go through extremely shallow water. For small rivers a shorter yak will be superior as they manuever better. There are some very inexpensive deck boats out there that will serve you well.

 

With your inseam of 30" I'd reccomend in the Cobra line the Explorer. It handles better in tight spaces than the Navigator. Its Ocean Kayak (OK) equivalent is the Scrambler. I fish with a few guys who like them a lot. The OK costs less than the Explorer. The Explorer is at least a dozen pounds less which I like especially when I've got a fallen tree across the river and I've got to get around or over it.

 

If $$$ is not a problem than look at the Poke boats. They have a kevlar and a fiberglass model and they're extremely light and very durable. They're the toughest yaks (even thought they don't call them yaks) made. The kevlar is 22#s and the fiberglass is 28#s however you could get 2 plastic kayaks for the price of one fiberglass Poke and 3 for the kevlars tag.

 

Whatever you decide on we'll do our best to help you outfit it. I have tried to assemble many of the hard to find accessories and make them available to people in one place and we'll stear you to whatever best suits your needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekfisher,

 

As to hull durablility. The beauty of plastic kayaks is how easy it is to repair them. I have never damaged one and I'm rough on mine. I often hit rocks and reefs. Rivers tend to have much smoother rocks than the barnaculled reefs in the salt. A ski welding p-tex gun does the repair easily. I recently repaired one and couldn't believe how easy it was.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekfisher,

I have no firsthand experience to share but will share the experience of my doctor. He has a Swifty, a Perception boat I believe. He fishes SM on the Potomac and really likes it. There is a difference, he is a pretty small fellow. It is however small, sturdy and cheap. Everyone here suggests that you try any boat you are thinking of buying.

Have fun,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Creekfisher.I have drug my boat up the suusqahanna many times and this will be the most dificult and tireing part of your trip. So go as light as you can get to float you well. Durability is not a problem with Cobras they have a lifetime warranty. I have replaced every one that we ever had a problem with brand new.Where do you live? I wharehouse in upstate Penna.

Barrell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.