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reelnut

paddles

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Well, I got my kayak (Tarpon 120). Now I just need something to help me move it on the water. My investigation into which paddle to buy, like just about everything else connected to my new sport, has left me feeling a little overwhelmed. I was encouraged when I saw JonS's reply to another post mentioning the Cannon Asymmetric at $85, until I went to the Cannon web site and saw there are five very different Asymmetric models. Any recommendations or cautions would be greatly appreciated. I'm a beginner, but expect to get a good amount of time on the water this year. I'd like something that will grow with me so I won't feel I have to upgrade too soon. I'll start off fishing lakes and bays, but intend to work my way up to launching into the surf.

Thanks.

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As to outgrowing a paddle its a tuff one to answer. I know guys who have been kayak fishing for several years and they still have the paddle that they started with. As with all gear its relative. From the paddle on up they'll all do the job. An important consideration is aluminum or composite shaft. That to me is a more important decision.

 

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baja55@optonline.net

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 01-21-2003).]

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Thanks for responding Jon. The advantage of a composite shaft over aluminum, I'm sure, is less weight but at a higher cost. Also, I picked up from the boards that aluminum is hard on the hands when the temperature drops. Is there anything not so obvious, pro or con, about either material that would be good to know before making a decission?

 

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Like salty said you can either wear gloves of put some type of material on the aluminum. If you do make sure that it allows your rotating hand the ability to slide easily without causing friction. My first paddle was a Cannon Assymetric fiberglass shaft. It served me well for a couple of years. It now has a good home as I have a carbon fibre.

 

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baja55@optonline.net

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I've never liked the feel of aluminum looms. Pretty indestructible but the aluminum I've tried didn't have the same give as composites or wood, not sure how to describe the quality of it exactly. The mid range of paddles, say $90-$150 are probably best value, there are lot's of them. They are generally light and well made enough to use for a lifetime. You can spend $400 for a better paddle but the improvement is certainly not twice as much paddle. You can break or lose them, too. Nothing wrong with buying a paddle you grow out of, either. You should have a spare, but avoid the really cheap ones.

 

I have 2 touring paddles that were around $130, one is a Werner and the other a Mitchell, I like both of them. In the $80 class I might look at wood, Bending Branches is a good brand.

 

The more hours you spend on the water the more you'll appreciate a decent paddle.

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