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Marksharky

Yakin the sweet water compared to the salt......

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I like both but if I had to make a choice it would be the salty brine for me. I find that that sinking the hook into a saltwater species a bit more exciting & challenging than fresh water fish. I also find the saltwater easier then the sweet stuff to fish.

I was out twice today- this morning in the Shrewsbury before light, simple launch easy paddle fishing by some bridges etc... Then I went out this evening in Deal lake, man what a spot- if you have a yak this is one great fishery. So many fingers, bends, tree lines & struture. However I find getting into position in fresh water a bit more challenging. We all no LMB love to hug the bank, with the trees hanging over & a bit of wind it gets kind of tough to set the boat up right for that cast that you want to put past your target for a retrieve. I find Squan res. easier than Deal though, I guess it all depends on the body of water. In the Surf all you have to do is look for some birds to get set up or a simple as trolling around the jetties. (ahh wait a minute the launch factor) The fear factor is definately greater in the salt especially at night, it is just so big & vast that your mind starts thinking crazy thoughts smile.gif "Anyway what in your wallet" the salt or sweet stuff- What do you like better& why?

 

Hey any of you guys want to do a Deal lake fling?

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Where is deal lake? I personally like them both about the same, though I do love the big boys you tangle with in the surf. I like getting right into the thick of lily pads and dragging flies over them and waiting for a big bass to explode on it. Sometimes the wind works just right and you drift right along past the trees/weed line, sometimes. The trick is to find some downfall to wedge against or tie off momentarily on a tree limb or let the lily pads check your drift. Then again, there's always an anchor, which I like to cinch off short, fish, lift off the bottom, drift a ways, drop again, etc.

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Until a couple of years ago I never fished the salt and I have lived on the beach all my life. Fished the long rod since I was a kid and was forwarned not to do the salt or become addicted like bad drugs. Alast, I hooked my first striper 2 yrs. ago. Big fish in big water is hard to compete with, however, one of my fondest fishing memories was a night fishing sweetwater with a big arse moon and one bigmouth bass after another. The biggest fall moon one eversaw! It's fishing, sweet or salt. Reality doesn't even enter the picture.

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I don't know how to compare the two yet. I have only taken mine in fresh. I am a horrible surf fisherman. That's mainly why I got the kayak. (Cobra Explorer) That and my freshwater rig #1 was sold and #2 died. I have not fly fished out of the yak yet. I usually don't fly fish in freshwater because I feel I can catch more on the spinning rod.

 

I love fishing from the kayak. I don't miss the trolling motor at all. I like to keep the paddle across my lap for fine tuning my positioning..etc. Nice and quiet with no bog downs in weeds and shallow water. Very nice indeed!

 

Today I fished a lil pond near here for about 6 hours. I caught 18 fish. (13 pickerel, 4 bass, and one nice bluegill) The action was non stop. I had 6 bite offs and 4 fish out of the water that got off in addition to what I caught....and probably twice as many hits, misses, and follows.

 

The beauty of this is it was so friggin windy today I would not have done this without the kayak.

 

The place I went is like a maze of ditches with a small open amount of water in the center. So I was able to "sorta" stay out of the wind...also helps that the place is kind of in a hole. I would have gone insane with motor snags...weeds, etc. or passed out rowing the jon boat. In the kayak it was a cake walk.

 

There is no way I would have had an enjoyable day today without the kayak and I doubt I would have had time to catch half of what I did considering all the other hassles I would have been fighting against.

 

I had problems getting used to positioning it at first..this was my 5th trip fishing in it today. I would mainly overshoot my spots and cruise right into where I wanted to cast..lol Just takes a little adjusting time I think. I just stopped paddling sooner and or back paddled (quietly) to slow down a bit and that seems to do it. It has to be better than the low gurgle of hitting reverse on a trolling motor.

 

I'm looking forward to bigger fish that will use my drag in the salt wink.gif

 

 

 

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For me it's a double-edged sword. I love the serenity and carefree nature of freshwater fishing. The light line, the sometimes challenging fish, developing patterns, the ride to the lake or stream, getting to a spot where there is nobody around, and most of all not having to worry about getting mauled by a speedboat. However the fish tend to be smaller than in the salt and your chances for unanticipated catches or large schools of fish are lessoned. Basically if I want peace, quite and relaxation out on the water i go freshwater fishing. If it is high adventure and a trip that must really keep my head on a swivel I go salt.

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I like it all and I'm glad that I don't have to choose. I love the versatility of a kayak setup for fishing. I love all environments.

 

Its really neat to put the yak on wheels and hike a half mile into a lake that you know is never fished because the bank is uncastable and the weeds and sediment in the shallows prevents a float tube launch. Paddling a river and finding a honey hole with a few dozen largemouths. Getting away from it all even thought there are a million people within a half hours drive.

 

The size and generally hotter action of the salt is fantastic. Being towed by a good fish is a blast.

 

Marky, a drift sock is IMHO a mandatory accessory. I don't often take an anchor out but I always have a drift sock in the hull.

 

You definately get use to manuevering the kayak in fishing freshwater as its much more critical. Smaller, wider yaks shine in this environment.

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Sitting on the ocean at eye level with the shore barely bobbing in and out of sight, feeling that second bump, then the scream of the drag. Tightening the drag just a bit and off you go on the Nantucket sleigh ride(can you say "ye ha") Working a Thresher that weighs more than my boat and most of me until he's beat and all but floating next to the boat (or cutting the line when you can't see the shore anymore and I got to make it in before next week). Now that's a rush!

But on the other hand,, I used to think freshwater guys only caught bait. Wrong!. I told that to the guy installing my cable. He smiled and said wait a minute. He went out to his van and got his video camera and said "this is what I did last Tuesday" and there he is grinning, holding up a 18 and 20 pound Salmon. Then he's releasing this 6 foot prehistoric beasty from hell (Sturgeon). All of this 20 minutes from my door and all caught from the shore (bank)!!!!

I said,,,,,,, oh.

Later I hear that the fight can go on for an hour and that they jump. I have'nt done battle yet but it sounds like a plenty formidable opponent and the idea that the shore won't ever disappear (although the spot that I put in will) is really appealing.

 

------------------

Wali

 

[This message has been edited by Waljojo (edited 04-05-2002).]

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