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SeaBreeze

Cold Weather 'Yakin (Wet-Suit?) (Help)

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I have a few questions on the topic so please bear with me...

 

I would like to take the new 'Yak out in early spring and the water will still be colder then comfortable and under a safe swimming Temp... But even now i see surfers down at the beaches catching waves in this freezing water... They have wet-suits on so now i am thinking this is the way to go?

 

 

They keep you warm in such water? what about your feet/hands?

 

It would be good to have a wet suit for summer Snorkeling off the kayak so is it a good idea to purchase one for kayaking?

 

Will it be to warm to wear it in the 90º Temps in the summer or does it keep you cool as well?

 

 

Can you find a good one for around or under 60 bucks??

 

Full or Short suit?

 

 

ANY ADVICE/COMMENTS/TIPS on the subject would be great

 

 

Thanks

 

 

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Wetsuits- remember- those surfers are mostly in or under the water. That's what wetsuits are made for. Kayakers are mostly sitting out of the water- but are wet from entry or tipping over. I find the wetsuit is good in milder weather- in the morning or night. Midday you wil cook in the sun.

I ordered a black rock jacket and pants to use as a wind breaker for the cold spring weather. I also will experiment with a mukluk boot for foot protection.

Check out the Duofold utech underwear as a base layer. Good luck. byw- also check out many of the discussions on this board re cold weather kayaking- it could save your life!

jake

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SB

60 or 80 bucks will get you 3mm Farmer Johns on sale. Another 60 or 80 bucks should get you some sort of paddling top. The 2 together will get you something to wear in 40-50 degree air and 50 degree water. Wear fleece under top in cooler end of that, no cotton. You will sweat once air gets a little warmer but it won't kill you. This time of year paddlers wear drysuits, a few hundred bucks on up. You could probably wear enough neoprene for cold water as surfers do but you would over heat unless you jump in. And then once you get out again the cold air is brutal on neoprene. Go slow and wait for better weather.

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SB

I go out in the spring all the time wearing a pair of stocking foot neoprene waders with a cheap pair of boots.. You can get the waders for $49 3 mil. and a pair of stream boot for around $29..Remember use a belt. I stay dry and warm..By the way in a wet suit to be warm you have to be wet like in the water all the time as soon as you come out you start getting cold. The key is to stay dry and the neoprene waders are the way to go. I have been under water in neoprene waders and they did not fill up with water. I would not try it with rubber waders.

 

Eddie

 

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[This message has been edited by BassBlitz (edited 12-29-2002).]

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There isn't a perfect system, unfortunately. I have found for me that breathable, stockingfoot waders and a dry top to work best for me. My base layer is Mysterioso which is hard to describe. Its a garment that functions like a 2 mill, breathable wetsuit, that breathes, has a wind barrier, dries very quickly, insulates when wet, and has other great features. If needed I then add additional layers and I use modern fibres like fleece, etc. which will insulate when wet. These I get at flea markets where the price is great. On my hands I like Stern's neoprene gloves. At $13 they're fantastic. I usually wear a wool ski cap on my head if the air is cold.

 

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JonS@****stuff.com

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It seems to me that if you dump and your ankles are as much as three feet below the surface that a truly leak-proof seal would have to be tight enough to at least restrict circulation. There's about 1 psi at that depth and it will find even the slightest opening. Waders or booties are the way to go IMO.

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Seabreeze, All the above comments are telling you that you should take it slow. Wait and learn how to paddle first. Go out on a nice spring day in a very shallow pond. Wear a lifejacket but do not go out in water that You cant stand up in and walk to dry land. Last spring a new kayaker died when he went out in his new kayak way to early,to windy,and too deep. See if the dealer who sold the boat will go with You and give you some pointers. At least have someone nearby watching and ready to assist. I prefer a gortex riansuit and knee high rubber boots. I know im not going to flip however. Yet I will have a lifevest on anyway.

Barrell

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The sport is growing in the region so hooking up with guys shouldn't be to difficult. That's one of the great things about kayak fishing. Guys are not only willing to give advice but also take you along. I have spent many, many days with people on their first forays on their yaks. As a group we do a lot of day trips that are suitable for people new to the sport. When we stretch the limits we let people know beforehand. On this forum and others you'll be able to hook up with others.

 

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JonS@****stuff.com

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