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rudy

yak fling hudson canyon

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To all,

 

After seeing the kayak trip in California I propose we rent a boat load our kayaks and fish the canyon. Who is with me! Wouldn't it be great having a Great white shark swimming around your kayak 100 miles from shore?

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Don't tempt me Rudy! I've been thinking along those lines for some time now but, after tangling with the first big tuna of my life last friday, I'm not so gung-ho to try it from a yak. Besides, I don't have the tackle to take something that large anyway.

 

On the other hand, an offshore wreck (say 5-20 miles out) with spadefish, snapper, big seabass, grouper, and more sounds like just the ticket.

 

Chris

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Chris, I agree that a first foray to a wreck would be a good way to go. Also I don't have any interest in makos or threshers. Here in the east you're just as likely to hook a 200# tuna, big blue marlin or very large mako as a small one. The west coast fishery for makos is predominently juveniles and when the tunas run, whether its a cold year and its longfins or a warm year and yellowfins, they rarely exceed 40#s. Once in a while some Bigeyes show up but in 3 years of fishing offshore of SD I never encountered any.

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Dude, you must have a set of cajones on you that make it hard to get into your kayak, or are sitting too close to the liquid paper.

 

Porter and I were on the same boat, it took 6 of us switching the stand up rod 2.5 hours to pull up a 72 lb yellowfin (light leader = light drag). I am sure, even with a drag chute deployed, and carabined in with other yakkers, that that bastard could have dragged us for a full day.

 

Also, the boat sticks are normally only 4 to 5 feet long. This fish swam in circles all day long. It would be hard to handle a paddle, a Penn International 50, a heavy boat rod and keeping it gimbaled all in one swoop.

 

I know Spike pulls up big fish, how he does it is beyond me....but he is also a lot closer to the continental shelf in CA and Mexico then we are and el nino can help out by pushing closer to shore.

 

You guys are brave dudes.

 

 

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The tuna I have landed, and also one big roosterfish(35#) pulled hard. The paddle is stowed and the drag buttoned down to allow the fish to pull the yak in circles. Then you play the angles and keep the pressure on.Take every inch as you can. Minimum 15 # test and 20# and 30# rigs are the standard set-ups. Most feel that 40# is too much for Yaks. The use of premium equipment-advanced reel drags and custom poles helps a lot too. Personally, I have not taken-on any sharks though.Vic out here and Rhino are the wild ones!RL

Dude, you must have a set of cajones on you that make it hard to get into your kayak, or are sitting too close to the liquid paper.

 

Porter and I were on the same boat, it took 6 of us switching the stand up rod 2.5 hours to pull up a 72 lb yellowfin (light leader = light drag). I am sure, even with a drag chute deployed, and carabined in with other yakkers, that that bastard could have dragged us for a full day.

 

Also, the boat sticks are normally only 4 to 5 feet long. This fish swam in circles all day long. It would be hard to handle a paddle, a Penn International 50, a heavy boat rod and keeping it gimbaled all in one swoop.

 

I know Spike pulls up big fish, how he does it is beyond me....but he is also a lot closer to the continental shelf in CA and Mexico then we are and el nino can help out by pushing closer to shore.

 

You guys are brave dudes.

 

 

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Great post guys,

Reminds me of trollng for Ahi behind a windsurfer along the reefs of Maui. 35# to 43# was the range of fish. Half that if a tiger got it before you did. WHAT ARE WE NUTS? I must be getting old.

TL

Shag

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Imagine this smile.gif

 

 

Spike_Sailfish.2a.jpg

 

Though yellowtail make up the majority of kayak anglers' happy days on the water, everything changes once the attention is directed toward southern Baja. Aside from the giddy feeling we tend to get when thinking about Baja road trips, hammock siestas in the palapa shade, authentic pescado entero con tortillas, frijoles, arroz y salsa fresca, and tranquil waters off the amber, desert shoreline, nobody can resist the coveted treasures of southern Baja that are easily accessible via kayak. The ultimate game fish are there for the taking and there is nothing greater than rumbling with Yellowfin Tuna, Dorado, Roosterfish, Pargo and Sailfish from a kayak. These species, especially the Sailfish, all demand the utmost respect and caution, whether it's from natural, external weapons (i.e., bills or spines), powerful jaws, sharp teeth or pure muscle. Just ask CKF's Dennis Spike who successfully caught and released a 120-pound Sailfish from the 'yak last year. I strongly recommend that only experienced kayak anglers participate in this level of kayak fishing. I also advise the group hiring a panga for on-the-water support. Sharing the panga fee, bait and tipping is well worth the "chaperone" that will assist with bigger fish, emergency situations, icing catches and carrying heavy essentials such as food and water. I recommend that beginner and intermediate kayak anglers fish the same general waters, but limited to ¼ - ½ mile offshore or less. There are still plenty of hard-fighting, tasty fish, and all will fall for artificial lures and jigs.

 

 

 

[This message has been edited by Marksharky (edited 08-25-2001).]

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Ooooh! Pretty thresher!

 

OK, better idea... once we get some of the East coast guys together a few times, those with the, um, cajones (?) head to Baja with Spike and the CKF crew to see what's up down there.

 

Chris

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