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cl surf fish

WHAT TO DO IN COLD

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In the ocean when waves are present the chance of getting wet is pretty good and you will need some type of waterproof setup. In the bay where chances are slim that anything but your legs will get wet fro paddle drippage I used to wear polorfleece sweatpants with gore tex rainpants over them. Gore tex /thinsulate gloves are sometimes needed if the air is cold. Since switching entirely to foot propelled hobies 4 years ago I now only wear polorfleece sweatpants tucked into knee high rubber boots and layers on the upper body. We Hobie owners sit in a dry kayak and NEVER get even a single drop of water on us unless we decide to use the paddle. I never wear a lifejacket in warm water but always wear one in the cold. Pacticing reentry with the heavy clothes you plan on wearing would be a smart idea. I had to do training a while back where we had to jump in a pool with long pants and boots on and swim and it was very difficult compared to wearing a swim suit.

Barrell

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icon25.gif You have to plan for going in. Regardless of yak. Some yaks are less waterprone for sitting in, but the fact is, you're plankton on the surface and there is always a possibility of taking a big swim. Now, it's better in the fall as the water temps still hangs pretty good. As opposed to the spring when the air temp is warm, but water may be in the 40's. So....plan for immersion. You can go with the full dry suit technology, or do what a lot of us non-pedaliingwink.gif kin do (pedaling kin should too). We use some form of wader under a dry top. I prefer a set of mysterioso under a wading foot chest high waders, with a belt, maybe two for extra reassurance, and a dry top like Gul, or similar. This creates a barrier which, if submerged, my PFD will float, I can easily reaccess the kayak, and keeps me totally dry. I have seen this setup put to the test on several occaisions and it works. Don't panic about the waders and deep water. If anything, they will have air trapped in them and you'll float high. Keep a set of dry clothes in the yak so you can change regardless of what you go with.

 

DO NOT GO OUT IN DANGEROUS COLD WATER/AIR TEMPS IN NOTHING MORE THAN SWEATS. You are asking for a disaster. If you fish in only 12 inches of water, then take the risk. Anything you can get wet in though has the potential for hypothermia. You get wet, you get on yur yak for th trip home, the air temp is in the 50's/60's and soon you have whisked all your body heat away. Go for dry, always. SIK or SOT. Scott

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cl

 

Scott hit the nail on the head with his post. This is what most of us use in cold conditions a drysuit or waders and a dry top. I have a Gul drysuit and with a set of mysterioso on you stay dry and warm. Same with waders and dry top as long as you get a good seal, I suggest a double belt system.

 

Barrell got part of it "In the ocean when waves are present the chance of getting wet is pretty good and you will need some type of waterproof setup." other than that ignore the usual Hobie sales pitch. I don't fish in NJ but the bays and harbors on LI can kick up pretty good and you will get wet on the bay. This is a water sport so ALWAYS dress to get wet.

 

Paul

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treetop, It is no salespitch I commomly get caught in 2 to 3 foot chop and dont get a drop on me in the outback. Most of the water you are getting on you is from the paddling action. Hopefully you dont own a yak that has puddles in the seat. I paddled for over 10 years I know how wet you can get with a paddle.

Barrell

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I live at the NJ shore and was a windsurfer for more than 20 years. My season was Feb. to mid Dec. Here are some tips that may help you keep warm kayaking:

 

If the water temperature added to the air temperature doesn't equal 100, you're going to be cold. Better to stay home. Even in Feb. you may get up to 6 days where these two temperatures will exceed 100.

 

In the coldest weather, don't dilly dally on the beach. Get your kayak on the water where paddling will help keep you warm. When you return, load up and get in your warm vehicle ASAP.

 

During the months of Feb., Mar., the last half of Nov, and the first half of Dec., I wore a full dry suit with 5mm windsurfing boots. The dry suit allows you to stay completely dry, even when fully immersed in water. From Apr. 1 to Jun. 1, I started with a full 3 mm wetsuit and ended with a 3 mm shorty (no sleeves or legs). About mid Sept., I started wearing the shorty again.

 

In the coldest weather, you need to wear a hat. A fleece lined neoprene cap or hood is best for keeping warm.

 

Gloves were always a problem for windsurfers. The best made neoprene gloves always gathered where your palms gripped the boom (this causes cramps in your forearm muscles). I used cheap yellow dish washing gloves bought at the supermarket. I found that if you protect your hands from the wind, they stayed warm. I bought them overly large. Even when I was dumped in the water and the gloves were wet inside, my hands stayed reasonably warm. Kayakers may prefer to use Northwest River Supplies's pogies. They block wind and spray to prevent wind chill and evaporative cooling. A hook and loop strap lets you store pogies on the paddle shaft when not in use.

 

Buy a carbon fiber or wooden paddle. Metal paddles conduct cold to your hands. All my booms were carbon fiber.

 

The other posters have some excellent proven solutions for keeping warm. However, my recommendation for the best protection for really cold weather paddling or when immersed in the water after a capsize, would be a premium Gore-Tex dry suit, roomy cut that accommodates under layers of warm clothing and allows full mobility. 5mm neoprene paddling booties and a neoprene fleece lined cap. The Kokatat dry suit has a good reputation with paddlers and windsurfers and meets my requirements but, an outfit like this will probably cost as much as your kayak.

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