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robraz

interested in kayaking

10 posts in this topic

i'm sure you veterans of kayaking have gone over this before but i will ask again

i am very interested in kayak fishing but i have a few concerns

1) i guess from TV you see these guys turn upside down and then roll the kayak back over-this concerns me as far as stability goes with the craft-how stable are they or how difficult is it to learn to become stable in them especially when you got a descent size fish pulling you around?

2) i see people coming throught he inlets with kayaks-is this safe with all the other traffic? does the wake from boats effect the kayak and its stability?

3) i guess the other concern is just safety and learning. can you take classes for the kayak? are there people willing to help you out?

 

i think of my self making it out there in this little craft and having something happen and not being able to get help.

 

i am on the verge of jumping into this sport espesially since i travel sooo far to fish the surf-i might as well make it more worth my time and hopefully have a better chance of catching fish.

 

any feedback is very much appreciated.

thanx

BOB

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Hi Robraz, I'm not sure you'ld call me a real veteran I've only been kayaking a couple of years. It evolved from previously canoeing for smallmouth bass. I'm sure more experienced people will chime in but I'll take a stab your questions.

1) Some kayaks are very stable. The kayak I own is capable of allowing a fisherman to stand and sight cast a fly rod. The folks you see rolling their yaks are in a sit inside yak. Alot of people prefer sit on tops for easier exit and entry. Do some research first and try as many as you can before deciding what is right for you.

2) Boat traffic is a definate concern no matter what I'm in. Salesmen will sell a boat to anyone who qualifies for a loan.

3) Yes there are lots of places that give kayaking lessons. I'm not familiar with what's in your area but I'm sure a little research and a few phone calls will dig something up for you. My wife and I took lessons before we purchased ours. The place had rentals and a package in cooperation with a local dealer that applied your rental fees to the purchase of a new yak.

Check out (LINK TO COMMERCIAL SITE DELETED) for starters. Ther's lots of info out there on the web. And plenty of discussions concerning sit-on or sit-in yaks. And lots of info on safety and suggestions for rigging them up the way you like.

 

It's a real fun way to fish and seems to be really growing in popularity. It does draw some curious looks from people though.

 

Good Luck and tight lines

 

TDog

 

[ 11-26-2003, 03:02 PM: Message edited by: AMMODYTE ]

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Bob, many people who have never kayaked before and consider kayak fishing often get the wrong idea by viewing kayaking in general. The vast majority of kayaks are used for paddling. We here in this forum are primarily fisherpeople who have recognized that the kayak can be a great fishing aide/tool. Some of the participants in this forum do both, paddle and fish, but most are like myself and the only reason we bought or are in kayaks is to fish. You'll never find people like us on the water without fishing rods and gear.

 

Your concerns are the same that most beginners have. One thing you need to consider. If it were difficult and dangerous would so many people be doing it? Obviously not. Its an extremely productive, fun and relatively safe sport. It has its dangers and some common sense will eliminate most of them.

 

Getting back to your questions. We don't roll our kayaks. Even if we could, things like rods, tackle, pliers, lip grippers, etc. would make it a disater. That is a technique used by people in narrow Sit Inside Kayaks (SIK). The vast majority of kayak fisherpeople use Sit On Top Kayaks (SOT). These are essentially glorified surf boards in many respects as you sit on the kayak, not in it. So should you tip you will fall off. SOTs are also self bailing. The hollowness of the kayak is accessed through hatches. SIKs are like canoes. They are open and can fill with water when swamped. SOTs can't fill with water unless you swamp it with the hatches open. The kayaks that most of us use for fishing are very stable compared to kayaks as a whole. Also its like anything. One gets better and the balance takes over. The first time you rode a bicycle I'm sure it wasn't simple but it got easy. Some kayaks, like the Cobra Fnd, Emotion Fisherman, WS Ride, OK Drifter & Malibu 2, Malibu Extreme are incredibly stable and tipping isn't really something to consider.

 

Many people when they first get a kayak or consider one often ask about inlets and other rough and dangerous places. This is thinking like a boat and a boater. I like to say that the only thing that kayaks and boats have in common is that they both float. Yes you can run inlets, rips, etc. and I have numerous times but this isn't the norm. A kayak will allow you to access places that boats do, where shore people do and also places neither can get to. This is the strength of kayak fishing. Fishing places that can't be effectively fished buy other means. This is the good stuff. Unharrassed fishes all to yourself. Our region, but generally most places, are loaded with these places. Just like any sport you should save the hardcore stuff until you gain some experience and go with others who have been there and done it.

Its funny because most of us bought kayaks because we got tired of going surf fishing and seeing the fish out of our reach. We always seem to need to cast 2-3 times farther. So we bought kayaks to go out there. I did too. Then we discover all the neat protected places we can fish inside and we spend much more time fishing these places then the open ocean. In my 300 plus days of kayak fishing I've probably only fished the open ocean 15% of the time, if even. Getting back to inlets, its safer to not use a busy inlet. Its much safer and easier to launch off of a beach near an inlet if you want to fish that particular area.

 

As to learning it isn't hard and there are a variety of ways to go about it. There are now kayak fishing guides and going fishing with one will certainly include instruction. Ther are general kayaking classes but they are geared towards recreation and SIKs, so while there will be some good stuff to learn a lot of it won't apply. Also kayak fishing has many apsects that a non kayak fisherperson simply won't understand. Also simply hooking up with a group of kayak fisherpeople and going out fishing is invaluable. Each day you go out you'll learn so much and your growth as a kayaker and a kayak fisherperson increases log rythmically with each trip. Most of the guys are relatively new to the sport and they are more then willing to help. The comraderie in the sport is fantastic. There are guys hooking up and fishing all around the region and if you're a weekend fisher its very easy to join up.

Another way to greatly accelerate the learning curve is to go on a kayak fishing trip. Many people do this and get a week of fishing in a nice place. You can also rent fishing equipped kayaks and try out a few models.

 

When asked about the sport most kayak fisherpeople have one major regret. They wish that they had discovered it much sooner. We affectionately call kayak fishing the "darkside" of fishing. The reason being that once you start kayak fishing you never go back. wink.gif

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Lot of good info there JonS.

 

Yes, you are going to get a kayak cuz you're tired of standing on the beach waiting for the bird frenzy to come to you. It ussually stays just out of reach.

 

This weekend I paddled 300 yds out to the middle of the action, while 20 surf guys watched from shore just waiting for their turn...which never happened.

 

In the spring there will be great deals on used kayaks. Getcha self one then. Use the wintertime to surf the internet and learn all you want about kayak fishing and safety.

 

Kayak fishing ... a whole new world.

Good Luck Mate.

-G

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I agree with Scott. There's a lot of fish around, the water's much warmer then Spring, and you can get going in the sport now.

 

G-Man I love when that happens. Last year around this time I was off the beach a couple hundred yards at most and there were hundreds of surf fishermen watching me catch about a dozen blues and stripers from 30-36". It was me and app. 25 boats.

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Its always fun. First time it happened high hook on shore was 3 fish. I lost track after 50. I only know that I didn't break 100.

 

One day Marksharky and I were out and it was getting cold. It was this time of year with a warm day but once the sun got low it got real cold. So while heading back to the launch point I trolled. Couldn't go 50' without a fish. I was freezing so I eventually took the plug out of the water so I could get to land and be warm. Guys on the beach and jetty got only one shot at the fish.

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