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TimS

Packin' for Martha's

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Yessir, Dubs and I are headed to the Vineyard...and we're packin' two yaks. We're bringing alot of other gear along as well, but would like to do some yakkin' in these fertile waters while we're up there.

 

Anyone with MV yak experience think of anything we'll need up there that we normally wouldn't think of here in the flatlands/shallow waters of NJ?

 

Never been to the Vineyard and just wanna make sure we got it all covered! wink.gif

 

TimS

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Tim, if you can get your hands on a good map that will prove useful for a first MV trip.

A lot of the areas are not marked at all.

There are no signs that say this way to xyz beach.

 

I don't know how much info you got from the guys as far as where to go and all that but if you need some direction I can probably help a bit.

 

The yak's should be fun if there are still some tunoid's around but ya better hurry they'll be gone soon.

 

 

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When I left last week there was plenty/tons of peanuts in Cape Poge Bay (surprise, surprise). These were slightly smaller than the ones we've been getting here. If you are out on the yak - know the weather obviously - the wind is the biggest factor. The bass were solid in and out of Big Bridge inlet - but most were small. Saw some nice ones flipping in the Squibnocket surf, but out of range with the flyrod. Nailed some with poppers (spinning) though...My last morning, before my 6 am ferry, I had bass to 27" every single cast on outgoing at Big Bridge with a bucktail. No kidding. Maybe bigger ones will have moved in now... Good Luck!

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Tim-

 

If you're interested in hooking up with albies and bonito, I would take the 'yak up to Menemsha inlet and Lobsterville beach.

 

Last year I saw a bunch of kids in a flat tin boat pounding the kakukas out of the albies...oh I was I had my 'yak with me.

 

If you're flyfishing, they're usually feeding on the abundant baby herring (you'll see the schools on the insides of the jetty). These particular herring are yellow and green (just like the colors you see on a crippled herring), about 2+ inches long and not very fat. Also, I hear that tinker mackeral patterns work too, though I have not tried them.

 

If you have spin fly rod, bring 1 oz deadly dicks (stainless steel color) and/or same sized swedish pimples. Also, if you have a chance to snag some locally made glass minnows (essentially green-painted leadheads with flashabou tails), then don't hesitate to use these...they are fish killers.

 

While the currents in the inlet may be a bit swift for an extended yak session, the adjacent lobsterville beach area is fairly quiet and the albies are often within casting distance of shore flyrodders (immediately left of the jetty). Bring an anchor...no worries about snagging bottom, Lobsterville is fairly sandy.

 

Though not as well known, there are some nice doormat fluke in the inlet that I have taken on very deep sinking line (chartreuse and white streamer, blah blah blah).

 

Inside the inlet, and the back bay pond itself there are plenty of narrow straits and pools to fish for some nice stripers. Early morning is best regardless of tide b/c boat traffic isn't too bad. Any generic deceiver pattern (large or small) will usually work well.

 

Happy hunting. I'm jealous...this will be the first year I will not have fished the derby.

 

-fww

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Oh, forgot to mention that Cape Pogue Gut is a great place for a yak. One advantage of having a yak is that you can launch from Edgartown and don't have to camp out on Chappy the entire night to catch the early morning albie/bonito bite. The place is absolutely thick with baitfish...good luck if you go there. Bring your fly tying kit.

 

Lots of guys have been catching bones and albies in edgartown harbor during the all daylight hours, but boat traffic is very heavy here too (obviously).

 

Please - if you're headed out to No Man's land by Squibnocket, pack a helmet and a vest, and if you're sitting inside your 'yak I hope you have buoyancy bags. I've seen a few brave kayakers out there flinging eels for some nice bass (last year's Derby winner was caught here I think). But that place is treacherous with all those hidden rocks/boulders and big waves (especially on incoming moving water). If I had room I personally would pack a marine VHF radio and maybe even a flare gun.

 

Sorry to blab.

 

-fww

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