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cliffblair

Panic!!!!!!!!

9 posts in this topic

I stored my new Pamlico excel upside down on foam blocks as recommended. I just rolled the yak over to work on it and found an awful dent on the rear deck about 4 inches deep and a foot long where the rear deck rested on the foam block. The rear deck is fairly flat. The front deck is more of an upside down v and showed no sign of denting.

Boy is that polyetheline soft stuff!

If that is going to happen in mild spring weather, it looks like a total melt down by mid summer when the temperature gets into the 90s.

I read on the board that a sunny day with the dent facing the sun will cause the plastic to return to its origional shape from memory. Has anyone tried it?

The dealers I have seen store their yaks on wide web straps on their side....

Will memory relly happen?

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Memmory does happen. I put a huge dent in a SIK on a hot day a last week. It came right back. There are some soft plastics out there.

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Was your boat a dark color? White is the best color in hot weather. Try wrapping black or clear plastic around it. If all else fails get a compresser and fire some air into the drain plug of a warmed boat.

Barrell

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Thanks for the suggestions, hot water is another. Its sad to spend $1000 on a yak to have it melt in warm weather. What will happen if I strap it down on the roof on a hot July day? A giant sit in surf board I guess!

The Pamlico Excel is over 15 feet and near 90 pounds so that puts 45 lbs pressure at the contact point, but the block was wide and soft, should never have happened in my opinion. Is Wilderness Poly softer than most? A beautifull boat, but~guess thats why they call it tupper ware.

 

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I read In WS site that first choice is to store plastic boats on end, second on side which is stronger than bottom or top. Surprised they recommend storing upside-down.

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Cliff,

Sounds like you may have been point loading the deck using that aft block. You may want to consider using padding/supports that will bridge accross and span that thin deck area. You want to contact the kayak on its edges or rails, rather than on the thin deck itself.

 

Also, make sure the weight of the kayak is distributed evenly from front to rear by weight, not judged by distance. You can use a bath scale(s) to determine the datum points. Mark them with a sharpie pen with a small triangle for future reference.

 

Yes, you have to be very careful when nose and tail tying poly boats onto roof racks-especially in the summer weather. I always try to tie accross the hull and through the scuppers fairly tight against a soft cushion(pool noodles), then It is a good practice to just keep the nose and tail straps or ropes fairly loose and just "snug". The longer the kayak sits tied down the more the shape is going to move. Hello banana! Remember that if you tie the boat down when it is cool outside, that as the temps rise during the day that the straps can become quite a bit tighter due to everthing expanding with heat. Also, that nylon strapping, when cinched down damp, can dry-out during travel and shrink. Either case may call for a re-adjustment of the tie downs to relieve unwanted down pressure. Check the tension often. Plastic is fantastic-right?

 

The materials that these boats are made out of will cold flow at room temperatures. My local dealer's yard and also the Cobra factory storage yard in Gardena, CA, which I have visited and photographed, sees all their poly kayaks sitting on end. Just like they store molding at Home Depot. Hmmm... Must be a reason.......Too bad these kayaks are not made from a better grade of engineering thermoplastic; one that would give us about 50 degrees higher resistance to normal service temperatures. To make that happen, we'd have to stop buying the current generation designs by the droves. The kayak industry has us stuck at a compromising "price Point". There are many advantages to the PE Poly construction though, among them a low molding temperature, repairability, damage tolerance to scratches and dents and the good ole price per pound of the pellets at a few pennies.

 

What does Beagle have to say on this topic?? Is there a next generation plastic on the horizon? Who will be the first manufacture to offer it?

 

 

[This message has been edited by sharp1 (edited 06-05-2002).]

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Thanks guys, the hull is a dark blue green, ptetty, but but bad for heating up. A friend who has a Pungo suggested the upside down storage on blocks, sounded good to keep the rain and leaves out, but the Pamlico is far from a Pungo in design and weight. On end is out of the question so it is on its side now. I have a nice shaddy spot behind my workshop to store it and will rig up wide straps to spread the weight out. I just hope the mold memory still works. I could always turn it upside down and rig a few small sand bags for the inside to help push, monitoring it carefully. Live and learn I guess.

Trading it back for a Wilderness Kevlar Pro would be nice but probably cost an aditional $1,500 but I simply cannot rationalize it, got to learn to take care of what I got, but then kevlar is 30 lb lighter for the same size yak, but then kevlar probably has its problems...gotta burn that credit card before its too late!!!!!

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Trying to get the "perfect" kayak/canoe resin is an on going project that the plastics industry is always working on. The difficulty is achieving strenth without having the part be brittle. ABS and PVC ate both "stronger" (and cheaper)but would not withstand the impact tests that are done with the present resins used by most manufacturers. Unless of course you made the part thicker.....ahh, but then you have increased weight. There are new resins coming down the line, some makers are using them. A couple of years ago some started using a "super-linear" resin. They were able to hold their present strength values and dcreased weights by as much as 12% on some models. The industry is very wary of making quick changes to the newer resins until they are positive the effects will not be negative. Testing a new resin by the paddling manufacterers can take a year or more. The repercussions of resin failure in the field over a whole product line could sink even one of the major players. New and better resins are coming.

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