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JoeB

Beginning the search!

24 posts in this topic

Hey, what the heck.... biggrin.gif

 

OK, I will be back home on LI starting this Monday and have the locations of three Kayak dealers I plan to visit. These are the companies I plan to look at initially, based on topics (both past and present) posted in the forum (in no specific order of preference):

 

1. Cobra Kayaks (Explorer)

2. Wilderness Systems (Tarpon)

3. Ocean Kayak (Scupper Pro XT)

 

I included the models that I thought would best suit fishing the backwaters of Great South Bay, though this was from memory, so I may have some models mixed up the their respective manufacturers. icon15.gif

 

I would GREATLY appreciate any additional insightyou guys could give regarding others that are worth a look. I'm 5'7", 165lb, with 31" inseem. The yak will be for small-ish type water--fishing exclusively. Budget considerations apply.

 

I look forward to hearing some suggestions! Thanks again to all who have helped and motivated me to start this process.

 

I guess it doesn't hurt that my girlfriend thinks I have O.C.D. when it comes to all things fishing-related, huh? wink.gif

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

 

[This message has been edited by JoeB (edited 03-16-2002).]

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Excellent choices all. I'd look at the Scupper Pro TW (Tankwell) instead of the XT, much better suited for fishing. Also, I paddle a Necky Dolphin and in the same class as those you list and, to my eye, built better than most. Overall, you won't go wrong if you start with that list.

 

Chris

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I've been reading this board also and began my search this morning. I don't know where you are on Long Island, but the best prices I got were from Seatauket Harbor Canoes and Kayaks. The guy has a ton of Kayaks and I settled on a Percepyion Swing. I'm 6' and about 200 lbs. But Ithink lighter weights would work well in this Yak. I think ScottO has one of these too. I have to get in contact with him to find out how to set it up. If you want the price I got,PM me.

 

John

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Joe I fish the great south bay also with a navigator which is even longer then the explorer.I would leave out the explorer and replace it with the cobra tourer.I am going to get an expedition just for the bay,and use the navigator for the surf.You will not be sorry about the exta speed.Also look into the Necky Dolphine ,it is also one sweet yak.

 

have fun Doug M

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Thanks for the responses guys.

 

OK. Here's some additional points:

Porter: I made a mistake and wrote XT instead of TW for the Scupper Pro. At least I'm starting to think in the right direction, eh? wink.gif

 

DW-I have come across the Seataket store during my web searches. Check your PMs biggrin.gif

 

Doug-The Tourer definately looks sweet! Is the Explorer (in you opinion) a "slower" yak on average compared to the others I have mentioned? I just check the Necky Dolphine online...damn, they are all starting to look nice. Two things come into consideration as reasons I am hesitant leave out the Explorer, though. (1) Very good price--a prime concern for this 27 y/o "professional student" rolleyes.gif The base price for the Tourer is a bit more than the Explorer. (2) I am pretty much only interested in fishing "small water". Not because I don't think it would be a great way to hook up with some fish, but I am sure that as soon as I fall in love with 'yakin', my girlfriend (who truely loves the outdoors/water/fishing ALMOST as much as I do) will want to take up kayaking as well. Additionally, there are way too many spots in the back that I have been wanting to hit with the flyrod that are not accessible by boat or wading.

 

So the "updated list" stands at:

 

Cobra (model TBD)

Scupper Pro TW

Wilderness Systems (Tarpon)

Necky (Dolphine) **unsure of price range for this boat**

Perception (swing)

 

WOW--that may be my longest post to date. I appreciate the insight!

 

Please, I hope everyone with an opinion throws their virtual hat into this ring!

 

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

 

[This message has been edited by JoeB (edited 03-16-2002).]

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Just check out the Perception swing online. Nice. Real nice icon14.gif

 

Ugh. This ain't gonna be easy! biggrin.gif One could always have worse problems, of course. wink.gif

 

 

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

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As a "professional" cheapskate and frequent purchaser of kayaks, I'll give you my input.

 

You may have trouble finding the Necky Dolphin around here. The price is somewhat higher than comparable boats. It is a beautiful boat.

 

The Swing is probably the best all around boat you'll look at but you may have to travel a bit to get a good deal on one.

 

The Scupper Pro TW is a great straight line boat and you have the perfect dimensions for it. I have a local dealer who was trying to get rid of one for 100.00 off. I don't know if he still has it.

 

If you decide on a Cobra there are guys on this board that can get you a good deal.

 

If you want an awesome straight line boat with great internal capacity, add the WS Tarpon to your list. If you live for ultra stable, add the WS Ride and OK Malibu II to your list. If you want quirky, fast, and beautiful lines, look at the Heritage Sea Dart.

 

If you want to try some out locally, and you don't mind driving to Kingston, I have a Swing, a Sea Dart, and a Malibu II you can try out.

 

If you are still looking in April, check out our kayak fishing derby on the Hudson. We have all sorts of boats for that production.

 

 

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I haven't paddled the Dolphin but my buddy Derrick is very familiar with it. He says that its a great yak but an advanced ride. Not a yak for a beginner to learn the sport. There is a learning curve in this sport and most fisherman, from my experience, are buying a yak to fish. You certainly need to learn some things about kayaking, but many fisherman do not get into paddling beyond a fishing standpoint. So a versatile, forgiving kayak is the best choice to pop your cherry.

 

If you want it for tight places get an Explorer. Here are my reasons.

1) Its a great yak to learn on and it'll get you fishing the widest variety of environments. Anything from small rivers to launching through the surf. The only place its weak is in covering distance as its not a fast yak. It excells in small waters and at 40#s is very easy to handle. It'd be a great yak for many waters up in the Albany region. It handles rapids well and is a pleasure to take into small rivers and even creeks. I love exploring waterways with it. If I need to carry it over or around a log jam, no problem. Long shallow sections, its easy to drag. Got a remote lake, its light weight makes it easy to wheel. Your girlfriend is probably going to love it. DougC is getting a Navigator since his Explorer is being taken over by his girlfriend Jamie.

2) The Explorer is a very forgiving, user friendly kayak. Both kayakjoe and I learned this sport with one.

3) As you gain experience you may wish to get something different. Should you decide to sell it it may be the easiest kayak to sell used. It does so many things well that many guys entering the sport want one.

 

Have fun checking out the yaks.

 

[This message has been edited by JonS (edited 03-17-2002).]

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Don't let JonS put you off, the Dolphin is no more an "advanced ride" than most of the other boats you have mentioned, and I've paddled them all except the Tarpon. It's a little soft in the center but hardens up very nicely and progressively as you lean it further. This is largely what makes it such a capable sea boat.

 

The secondary "edge" is so nice and firm that I very often fish with both legs over one side of the boat. Doing this, the hull leans to about 15-degrees then stiffens up very nicely.

 

The Tarpon, based on its very Greenlandic shape, should behave in a very similar manner, it's just too bad they don't have a tankwell model out (yet?).

 

Chris

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Sea Dart.....quirky??? wink.gif I would really like to know what that is. Do you mean one could get wet if one doesn't remember he's on a kayak instead of a cruise ship? wink.gif

 

I never paddled the Dolphin but I see many simularities to it and a Sea Dart. Both are greenland style hulls and very well made. Though I doubt I would sit side saddle in my Sea Dart for very long. wink.gif

 

Don't get me wrong I am not getting defensive about the Sea Dart I just haven't heard that term applied to it's characteristics before.

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Quirky meaning it's deceptively stable and then it's not. JonS has had some experience with friends getting pulled over in that boat by fish (I'll let him explain that because I don't remeber the exact situation). It's also quirky because of the high, sharp sides which you either love or you hate. Not as easy to sit sideways as a result. Another quirky feature is the rear hatch which sits almost at the waterline.

 

It's my primary river boat around here in the Hudson because of its great speed and very low wind resistance. It also keeps you drier than other boats and warmer because of the high sides, so it's a great cold water SOT. I also think it's the best looking kayak I've ever owned.

 

It's not my preferred boat for surf because it holds water too long. It drains like a bathtub.

 

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Guy's I have to agree with Santiago II he is a professional cheapskate smile.gifsmile.gif He made me drive four hours to New Hampshire to buy our swingssmile.gif But seriously he loves his heritage, me? I didn't like it for the ride. Scott It is quirky looking. Such shallow depth for and aft, has a greatly reduced internal volume or accessiblity. S

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Actually it was kayakjoe who witnessed the problems John had with his new Seadart. Since Joey is sick as a dog I'll retell the story as I remember it being told to me.

 

Basically what occurred is John's first day out in his new Seadart turned into some day. He hooked a decent striper and it ran perpendicular to the kayak. The Dart has very pronounced skeps which make it track incredibly well but in this situation it didn't allow the yak to follow the fish. The direction taken by the fish, John's inexperience, and the characteristics of the kayak resulted in John's being pulled right over into the water. Joey was fishing on a nearby islet and when he saw that John was in trouble he swam out to help him. If Joey and I believe that SteveL weren't there it had the potential of being disastorous.

 

We discussed it alot as an example of dos and don'ts.

 

Meanwhile if anyone wants a Seadart I understand that dealers are choking on them. That means they can be had at an excellent price. This is definately not a beginner yak however. Its a thoroughbred and you're either going to like it or .......

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OK Santiago........I understand now what you meant. And yes, you do have to remember you are on a kayak at all times in it. I find the Sea Dart very fast for a kayak just over 14' in length. The only time I fell out of mine was, as I explained in another thread, when I was pushing the limits by leaning it over through the edge.

 

Now my Nomad II fast touring, well it is very sensitive especially for a 230lb paddler. My wife and daughter have never rolled in it, Me.....several times. My 16 year old last year would stand in the Nomad and run and do flips off the bow. The Nomad is VERY fast though. Guess you trade one thing for another in this game all the time.

 

I really enjoy my Sea Dart. It gets me from flats A to flats B with speed, comfort, and reasonable stability. It will carry a bunch of tackle in the hull and I really like the comfort of the seating position and seat....I have slid down and slept on it before in IBSP. (Us old guys need a nap from time to time wink.gif)

 

As far as fishing from the deck of the Sea Dart......I may do that 30-40% of the time the other 60-70% it is a means of transportation from one wading area to another. What can I say.....I am a wading junkie.

 

Recently I have seen two yaks with those inflateable sponsons bungee'd to the side of their decks or inflated resting under the gear bungee's on the aft deck of a SIS and a SOT kayaks. I haven't gotten to talk to a user of these sponson's as yet but my mind tells me it is a sure cure for "quirky" wink.gif One I saw going the opposite direction on rt 40 in Hauve de Grace, MD. The other was in Ft Lauderdale, FL.

 

Anybody on the board ever use these before or know someone who has?

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I really like my Sea Dart but I have to be objective when I assess it's performance.

 

I got mine for $550.00 from a local dealer when the Mark IIs were coming out to replace the older models. I could have bought 3 at that price. I like the Mark I design better anyway.

 

I spoke to another dealer who told me they have the best dealer profit margins of any kayak company (50%) so they can afford to sell them fairly cheaply.

 

I would buy another one tommorow if I could get another great deal. You can't get the same performance out of any other fishable boat that size.

 

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