Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
FLYRODDER

New Kayak Info

11 posts in this topic

I'm 6'4" tall. I'm looking for a sit inside type kayak for flyfishing. Starting with backbays,harbors and inlets then when I have the confidence I want to take it out on the ocean. I also want to be able to go long distances without drag.

What should be my choices. I know I should try out as many kayaks as possible but I want to at least narrow the numbers down.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim and I both have the Old Town Loon 138. This is a nice boat, virtually no drag and plenty of leg and storage room. So far I've been in some pretty hairy conditions and haven't even come close to tipping the boat yet. I'm still pretty new to yakkin' so I dont have allot of experience with other yaks but I love the one I have.

 

We were out with JimDE and according to the GPS we were doing about 4 to 5 knots at a comfortable paddle. these things really scoot along. You may want to check one out.wink.gif

 

------------------

-----------------------

Dubs a.k.a., Charlie

dubs@stripersonline.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm 6'4" and I weigh 210lbs and 42years young. The reason for the sit inside kayak is I don't want to have to purchase a wet/dry suit. I want to be able to wear comfortable cloths without getting soaked. I usually start fishing in late FEB when the water is cold and will fish in December also. On a sit on top I'll be constantly getting wet. With the sit on top what do you do in the summer when its warm when you start then all of a sudden the air starts to get cold? Give me the pros and cons on both maybe you'll change my mind. I know the prices for the sit on top is much cheaper than the sit inside and also its easier to get back on a sit on top if I get tossed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm your size Flyrodder AND I have a Loon 138 tricked out for fishing.It was my first Kayak and I'm kind of a nutty risk-taker as far as ocean conditions,whatever...have not yet dumped in it (and I've tried).For its size, it's a pretty maneuverable yak,can get out of trouble quickly in the big ocean swells.VERY STABLE!! with the low center of gravity.It's my prime boat in the cold up here N.Shore Mass, put on a spray skirt and I'm paddlin' all year round-no worries.I also have a Wilderness Systems Freedom S.O.T. that I love...very fast,carves turns on edge. Don't have a lot of room on it for gear(inside is a different story...roomy hatches).I use this one now(warmer weather),like to slide on/off it fishing my local flats.This boat is'nt for rookies, it's fairly tippy in the rough stuff, demands more concentration than the 138.Your center of gravity is higher on a S.O.T.

Snap on the spray skirt when launching the 138 in the surf and you can take on most curls head on.The big cockpit on the 138 is great for the room it affords, but it can fill up with splash, which you'd hafta pump out if you fish the surf a lot,as opposed to a smaller cockpit boat.The 138 is really one tough boat, I beat on mine constantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FLYRODDER, You are right in asuming that you will stay warmer in the cockpit boat when winter paddling. Very few yakers however have the experience or gonads to go out in febuary in a yak. I dont. If you are a novice develop your paddling skills in warmer weather, learn self rescue,and invest in good rescue equipment. Practice so that if you do dump in Febuary off the beach you survive it.

Barrell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am ready for a YAK too, how about a softy?

 

 

IB264S-IB264S.jpg

 

Duck hunting, fishing high mountain lakes, shooting the rapids, whatever

your choice of individual watersport, this is your boat. A heavy-duty PVC,

four-chambered air bladder provides protection against deflation due to

collision. A protective 840-denier nylon outer cover works with the durable

nylon bottom and skid-plates, both front and rear, to guard against abrasion

damage. Tracking fins ensure straight-line stability. Two elastic mesh

pockets, see-through lure pockets, rod holders, bait holder, paddle holder,

drink holder and bungee deck lacing assure you have storage for all of your

gear. And for easier propulsion, an aluminum motor mount chassis is

included, along with an inflatable battery pad in a battery compartment, so

you can easily add a trolling motor. Includes a duffel bag for transporting

the boat and a repair kit, just in case.

Size: 39" x 116".

Weight: 41 lbs. 5 oz.

 

[This message has been edited by Marksharky (edited 07-18-2001).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One japanese circle hook is all you need to mess up that softy, seriously I fish an Ocean Kayak Scupper pro tw from late april to october in long island sound. No matter what type of yak you are paddling in cold water you should be prepared for immersion. The stability of either a sit inside or a sit on top is not an issue if you end up in 45 degree water, the issue is what you are wearing to protect yourself from the cold ie: wetsuit or dry suit. I use a farmer john wetsuit with a dry top and have been comfortable in 55 degree water, but I wouldnt want to do it for long. Remember whatever you fall out of it is still cold. Good luck Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FLYRODDER,

 

I fish from a SOT because I feel that they're both more versatile and safer. I dress differently than others to allow myself to handle weather extremes. I don't fish when its really cold but I've been out in 15-25 mph NE winds off of Sandy Hook with a water temp in the high 40s. Both my yak and apparel handled it without a problem.

 

What I wear are a pair of breathable, waterproof, stockingfoot waders with oversized diver booties. On top I wear a breathable, waterproof top. There are kayak tops that have sealed necks, wrists and waists that keep water out. I then use an elastisized waist belt for added protection and a PFD over this. The wader actually trap air and provide floatation in addition to the PFD. Essentially I've got a 2 piece dry suit. I stay dry and warm and my perspiration gets to escape. Depending upon the air temps and wind chill I layer modern fibers underneath accordingly. The beauty of this system is that it allows me to be comfortable at greater extremes than a wet suit. Wet suits, afterall, are wet and no matter what the temp, being wet isn't as comfortable as being dry. With only shorts and a t-shirt underneath it also handles those times when a wetsuit is to warm but it isn't warm enough (especially spring) to be out without protection. The air temps may be up there but the water's cold.

 

This setup eliminates the SOT from nasty/colder weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.