Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
JoeB

Hindsight is 20/20, right?

13 posts in this topic

Ok guys-

 

Is there anything that you know now, that you wish you knew when purchasing you first yak?

 

I'm speaking specifically in terms of mistakes/mis-impressions that you had while getting started that will help out an eager angler looking to get started.

 

If you thought I was a pest before...school is out for me for the next 10 days! biggrin.gif Ya ain't seen nuttin' yet! wink.gifwink.gifwink.gif

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

icon14.gif

 

I've pretty much resigned myself to not take the plunge this season ( wink.gif ). I gotta save my pennies. biggrin.gif

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, One of the biggest mistakes that most of us make is mounting the accessories in the wrong locations . Will the paddle clip hit you in the knuckles every tenth stroke?. Will you be able to get to your rod without doing moves that a gymnast would be proud of?. Where do you tie off your anchor line so that it is not in the way of landing a fish?. If you have to jump out of the yak will your legs get caught on rod holders or electronics?. Where and how do you store tackle so that if you dump, your not out $200 in lures?. How will you tether or store your rod during a surf launching or landing?.

 

There are many solutions to these problems, which depend on your particular yak and the way that you fish. Go out a few times and think about these things before you mount them. It will save you many holes in the yak.

 

Doug M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amen, Doug.

 

I have ( hopefully had) a tendancy to put too much stuff on deck. In the end it served mostly to snag hooks or make quickie ejections problematic, as Doug rightly points out. Keep your deck as stuff-free as you can.

 

Speed. If you fish offshore or have to paddle some distance to get to your spots, get a hull designed to move efficiently. It may lack a little in stability but when the blues pop up a quarter mile off, you're still in the game. Conditionining is the other big part of this.

 

One thing I got right, right out of the box: put the rod holder in front of you. The hit is immediatelyt apparent. Drop the paddle, grab the rod and set the hook. The rod holder behind works for lots of guys but the hook-up is frequently a matter of timing and if you can't even see the hit.....

 

Safety. Top o' the line PFD, hand held submersible VHF, wet and dry suit, flares, whistle, yellow (the most visible of colors) everything. It all seems like stuff until you need it (I haven't yet) but the sport is dangerous. Be prepared.

 

It's also primal, exhilerating, beautiful, peaceful, solitary and restorative. Make your own mistakes; as all of us will tell you, the greatest attraction is that it's a never ending learning curve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing I thought I had seriously screwed up on was getting a SINK. I was hearing that they were unsuitable, too tippy, no deck storage, first good fish I'd be over, etc. I learned to keep tackle simple and started on a slow curve so I could learn about the boat. It didn't take very long to feel comfortable and it covers a lot of water when I'm up to it. There is definitely a lot going for SOTs as fishing boats but if you have time you can try a lot of different boats out and ask a lot of questions to see what's right for you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like JimW said, analyzing too long and missing out on some good fishing. I should have been yak fishing years before I did.

 

My next mistake was to get a yak that nobody was fishing. That's why I tell newbies that they can't go wrong with one of the popular beginner/intermediate SOTs. There's a tremendous used market for them and you get to fish and learn while you're catching fish. Luckily I got it on Proform on my first yak so I got my money back plus.

 

Not getting into the sport sooner. Did I mention this? wink.gif

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As Doug said, on a single hull the addition of accessories safety and convience has to be closely examined with every addition.

 

Re-entry on the kayak being the paramount concern. This action is difficult enough on a barebones kayak. The Heritage line is best remounted in deepwater from the rear for example. Others will mount fine from the sides. My Heritage kayaks have flush mount rod holders mounted behind the seat instead of stand-ups just due to this design issue.

 

You will only learn these things from time on (or in wink.gif) the water. Or from the past experience of others who own the same kayak as yourself.

 

My dumping in the Sea Dart came while seeing just how far I could push the limit. I asked for a dumping....and got it. It doesn't happen slow...one second you are up...the next you are in the water. Once in the water you think "shoot that was dumb". Then you right the yak and attempt to re-enter. You think heck this is a SOT this should be easy. Not! You attempt to enter from the side...(in my case it was pulling a 49 year old 230lb carcass which was now soaked up on a SOT in 24' of water...) Up you go...back you slip.....up you go.....over the other side you flip.....up you go....slowly you pull the yak up and over yourself. After about 10 attempts you are starting to get exhausted and frustrated.

 

Fortunately my wife was in the Nomad during this little adventure.....laughing his arse off at first then as the senario unfolded and she saw my exhaustion setting in she started to get concerned. Out pops from her lips....the manual said this kayak was best re-entered from the rear (guess I should of read the darn thing). Well, to the rear of the kayak I went....it was an ugly sight I imagine (like a walrus having sex with a yellow hunk of plastic wink.gif) but I re-entered the kayak first time this way and I learned a valuable bunch of lessons. 1. Sea Darts get re-mounted from the rear. 2. don't push the limits. 3. read the owners manual. 4. never kayak alone till you have experience a deep water re-entry. 5. unless you feel like hearing your wife laugh for months (and months)...take someone who is not a family member out with you while you are doing steps 1-4 wink.gifwink.gifwink.gif

 

These are all things that experience will teach you. As others have stated keep it simple and I will add keep it safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim DE-

 

That may be one of the most entertaining (and enlightening) posts I have read in some time. Thanks for sharing!

 

------------------

Joe

Stranded in Albany

GO NAVY

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe-

My first yak was a regular scrambler-although alot of people like-em I really didn't.

every time I twisted around in my seat, I would flip it or nearly flip it. The problem was it was narrow,and had a relative high center of gravity-meaning the paddler sat higher up. I sold it and bought a scrambler XT- the difference was like night and day.

the XT has a lower seat- by about 2", is an inch wider, and about 8 lbs heavier- I am so glad I made that change- I have been in out in the ocean with 3 to 4 foot rollers going by, and don't even have to be careful about it fliping-it's wetter, but worth it.

I only weigh 150 lbs, but with all the fishing stuff, bigger (for me) was better.

Just my personal hindsight.

 

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.