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Sudsy

Olympics Thread........

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Only part of the Olympics that I am excited to see is the 74kg freestyle wrestling. My best friend I grew up wrestling with, Jordan Burroughs, is representing Team USA. He's been a good friend and training partner for several years. He'll wrestle Aug. 10 so hopefully he'll add a gold medal to a world championship and 2 NCAA titles.

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Rebecca Soni, gold meadal swimmer... born in Freehold NJ.

 

Didn't know that squid. Me and Jordan grew up wrestling for the same allstar team and team NJ. He grew up in Sicklerville wrestling for Winslow Twp. and I grew up in Runnemede wrestling for Triton. He has the fastest double leg I've ever seen. Practically unstoppable.

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That's two stories to watch now in wrestling. There's also Jake Herbert 185 lb Freestyle. He's the guy that Baba Booey'd the NBC camera during opening ceremonies.

 

Dude's 196 - 4 and graduated from Northwestern.

 

A question... Freestyle used to be called Greco-Roman? Freestyle is regular wrestling from high school?

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Freestyle is different from Greco-Roman. Both are different from folkstyle (NCAA). Points are awarded very differently in each discipline. Greco-roman is an upperbody/throw-only style contest. You won't see anyone attempt a Jordan Burroughs style double leg. In freestyle there are many ways to score points, and it's more similar to folkstyle, but still not quite like folkstyle. For instance, points are awarded just for exposing an opponents back to the mat.

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That's two stories to watch now in wrestling. There's also Jake Herbert 185 lb Freestyle. He's the guy that Baba Booey'd the NBC camera during opening ceremonies.

Dude's 196 - 4 and graduated from Northwestern.

A question... Freestyle used to be called Greco-Roman? Freestyle is regular wrestling from high school?

 

Yea Jake's a bada$$ dude. I watched him wrestle a few times in the NCAA tournament. Big difference between freestyle and greco-roman. Greco is literally all upper body. You get penalized for touching below the waist. Freestyle is somewhat similar to folkstyle but you can get away with a lot more than folkstyle. For example a legal freestyle throw is a belly to back suplex. Very dangerous throw.

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I saw that 10K race, she sprinted the entire last leg!! tha was sick. What I was thinking...as much as sh ewon by she was abotu 45 seconds off the wolrd record, so as fast and as much as she won by, sh ewas still almost a lap slower than someone else. lol.

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I don't understand why they let US citizens compete for other nations simply because their distant heritage may originate from that said country....if that was true, and I was athletic enough, then I could either compete for England, Ireland, Spain and (via my Puerto Rican side) the US. Weird concept...American melting pot so you can go and compete for someone else.

 

Btw, this occured to me during the Serena Williams Maria S (can't spell the entire last name) tennis match...that girl isn't Russian, she's American who happened to have her birth place listed as Russia...And I see NBA players playing for other countries as well (or have in the past - haven't caught one Olympic basketball game this time around)

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Btw, this occured to me during the Serena Williams Maria S (can't spell the entire last name) tennis match...that girl isn't Russian, she's American who happened to have her birth place listed as Russia...

 

She's Russian, when she first came up she even had the accent

 

Lot's of NBA players aren't American citizens

 

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Maria Sharapova's parents, Yuri and Elena, are from Gomel, Belarus. Concerned about the regional effects of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear accident, they left their homeland shortly before Sharapova was born. When Sharapova was two, the family moved to Sochi. There her father befriended Aleksandr Kafelnikov, whose son Yevgeny would go on to win two Grand Slam singles titles and become Russia's first number one world-ranked tennis player. Aleksandr gave Sharapova her first tennis racquet at the age of four, whereupon she began practicing regularly with her father at a local park.[12] She took her first tennis lessons with veteran Russian coach Yuri Yutkin, who was instantly impressed when he saw her play, noting her "exceptional hand-eye coordination."[13]

At the age of six, Sharapova attended a tennis clinic in Moscow run by Martina Navratilova, who recommended professional training at the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy in Florida, which had previously trained players such as Andre Agassi, Monica Seles, and Anna Kournikova.[12] With money tight, Yuri was forced to borrow the sum that would allow him and his daughter, neither of whom could speak English, to travel to the United States, which they finally did in 1994.[13] Visa restrictions prevented Sharapova's mother from joining them for two years.[11] Arriving in Florida with savings of US$700,[13] Sharapova's father took various low-paying jobs, including dish-washing, to fund her lessons until she was old enough to be admitted to the academy. In 1995, she was signed by IMG, who agreed to pay the annual tuition fee of $35,000 for Sharapova to stay at the academy, allowing her to finally enroll at the age of 9.

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