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Stripers on a 6 wt?

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I have a freshwater 6 wt fly rod that I use to catch LMB mostly and sometimes some SMB, but what I was looking to do was get into Striper fishing and I was wondering whether I could use my 6wt from shore. Any help would be great 

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Yes you can but it is not good for the fish. Fight would be too long in duration and stress out the fish too much. Unless of course we are talking about 12 to 15 inch twinks.

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It really depends on where your fishing and the size of the fish.I fish a 6wt quite a bit and have landed stripers to 26" with no issues.As long as there is little or no current and your rod has a good butt you will be all right.Even on light tackle it doesnt take long to bring them in.Most fish up to 10lbs are fun on a 6wt rod.Have fun.

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On our Cape Cod trip in June, I used a 6wt TFO TiCr (with 7wt line) for much of my wade fishing, to spare my elbow. It was no problem with fish up to 30" or so. When I was out with the guides and getting into larger fish, I was pleased to be using a heavier rod.

 

Steve

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I often use a 6 weight (10 footer) to fish for stripers from shore (tidal outflows) .... the tippet being 15lbs test and up. In that way battling the fish is sporting, yet it allows you to maximize putting pressure on the fish even with a relatively lightweight rod.

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What Spig said...I'd also like to add that when fighting fish(not sure on your skill level), you can put way more pressure on them to get them in quick than most people realize. A couple of my buddies can take a few minutes to bring in a schoolie on their 8wts, which sort of drives me crazy as it can be done in alot less time, which will only help the fish's survival.

 

One of the bigger issues you will probably face with a 6wt, is casting big and or weighted flies in wind, which a 6 wt wont excel at.

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I was wondering whether I could use my 6wt from shore. Any help would be great 

 

The answer is yes.

 

I've caught hundreds of stripers on my five weight. They have ranged from 16" dinks to far more substantial fish over 30". I have taken many doubles as well. It is a fun rod to fish with. Fun is important, right?

 

I must respectfully disagree with those who suggest that you will, by rote, endanger a fish by using what most consider to be lighter tackle for stripers. I have seen plenty of people take over five minutes to land a sub-legal bass on a nine weight. It's the indian, not the arrow. When I fish with my five weight, I am using a minimum of 20# for a leader system, usually 30#, and typically, 1/0, 3/0, or 4/0 hooks. I play the fish with the reel and the butt of the rod.

 

Likewise, I can throw flatwings that are 10" and even a little larger. I use a 9 weight WF floating line.

 

I don't like to use this setup if I need to cast into a stiff breeze, or if I'm fishing off a jetty in any kind of surf. I also wish the rod had a fighting butt. But casting and mending with this rod is a joy, and I've never felt like I was in trouble, even with a double-digit pounds fish in current.

 

My best advice is try it. If you love it, Yahtzee! If you don't, find something you do love. Have fun, experiment, and fish the way you want. You are the only person you need to please.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Steve Culton

 

A 32" fish from this spring, taken on the five weight in current. Not quite a cow, but no punk schoolie either. The fly, a Herr Blue, is a nine-feather flatwing about 10" long.

5:13:12HerrBlue.JPG

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Not a problem with 6wgt rod.

 

You may have some issues casting heavier flies but that's about it.

 

Look at a fly rod as two seperate tools designed to cast and play fish.

The nine foot length is need as leverage to cast the line and fly.

Needs to be designed to bend quite easily with a small load.

 

The three foot section of the rod attached to the reel seat fights and handles the fish.

The reel supplies the resistance.

 

If you play the fish perfectly during the struggle, the front third or more sections should be in a straight line with the fly line tention.

It all becomes a question of tippet strength and reel drag, wither it can handle to job or not.

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For fishing estuaies on foot a six is lots of fun with a floating line and small flies, it's what I use whenever I think I can,and there's no reason you can't pressure the fish adequately if you use proper technique. I've caught lots of 24-30" stripers on a six, but not in places with heavy current. It should not be ones primary rod or considered a beach rod, but a strong six, not a trout rod, is a fun thing to fish.

JC

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Steve,

 

Because I believe you to be a modest guy you probably don't realise just how skillful a Fisher you are. Your 5wt rod and 9wt line and the size of flies you cast would make me lift my eyes upwards if most people said they fished like that. I appreciate like a number of Guys on here just how hard you can fight a big fish with such a rod. But it could not be considered mainstream for most, for as has already been posted most Guys are not good at fighting fish with much more powerful rods even. I appreciate that you are not suggesting everyone fish this way just sharing what can be done with amazingingly light gear and how the envelope can be pushed. I love the way you constantly challange us.

 

Mike

 

PS. I am taking a floater with me to Montauk this year and I promise I will use it in the surf.

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That's very kind of you, Mike. I really appreciate it. I'm just trying to expand the knowledge envelope and have fun. Speaking of which, I hope you have fun with the floating line. :-)

 

Steve Culton

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For stripers, what Ray, Fisherman, etc. said. You fight the fish with your forearms, hands and butt, The tip half of the rod serves as a tensionor with direction changes but doesn't or shouldn't be applying pressure. My go to rod for the beach/flats is a lightish ten wgt but that's more for covering conditions, casting and fly size. And it's always whats rigged up (I'm lazy). But the ten is a pita when you find nuisance small fish.

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PS. I am taking a floater with me to Montauk this year and I promise I will use it in the surf.

 

 

Well tit for tat, I was just given a wetsuit, 7 mil tilos. So floater for you, wetsuit for me, a year of firsts.

 

O

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Well tit for tat, I was just given a wetsuit, 7 mil tilos. So floater for you, wetsuit for me, a year of firsts.

O

 

Heh heh, Oakie

 

We can bob around in the surf then and me not have to worry in case you ship one like last year. Man it should be a blast. Now I need to update the list. That is now two wet suiting Fly Boys I know of personally and one Dry Suiter Herb. Its a start.

Be fun having that floating line bobbing around and wrapping itself around our bodies.

 

If your suit does not have a built in hood it is really a good idea to buy one that you waer lie a hat. Not expensive but makes a difference to your comfort. A wind breaker jacket something like a kayak jacket or thin shell type of walking waterproof is good to help keep the wind chill down.

 

Here's to October.

 

Mike

 

PS Steve one way or the other I will make sure I have fun with the floating line. Just trying to figure just where and when on the beach I should use it.

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6 wt is a wonderful rod in back bays and estuaries in spring time when water is clear and cool. Later in season when water is warmer and/or in heavy rips not a good choice. A lot of inexperienced anglers don't fight the fish correctly - you should try to get it in quickly to avoid lactic acid build-up in their muscle fiber. Very important as the water warms.

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