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San Dieg Jam Knot - Surf fishing

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Hey fellas,



just curious. What lb test do you guys use when tying your own hooks?



Im putting together a set of hooks planning to use the san diego jam knots.



Using a 50lb basic mono line for tying but the knots arent coming out pretty!



Tying these leaders onto 20lb mono along with 40lb braid.



Tips n pointers!


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With heavier mono, that knot works best with less turns.

For 50lb I'll use 4. For 80lb, 3.

If you're using hooks with an offset eye, I would snell them..

 

If you're tying onto mono I'd use a blood or double uni, and for braid, Alberto knot, but are you using a fishfinder set-up or hi-low?

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both leader set ups.



Just going to be looping the hooks individual to the leader feeds =D



not gonna be blood tying anything >< got swivels vice versa.



Last time i blood tied, it came apart when pulling a fish up a high pier haha.


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The SD Jam knot takes some work and alot of hand strength.

 

I do them for Bluefish leaders with 80# test. It takes me awhile to do them. My hands are strong; I play bass and have large hands and the 80# really kicks my butt doing them.

 

Make sure you lube the knot before you cinch everything down.

 

Keep at it.

 

If you'd like I can post a video of my technique. Getting the placing right does alot to help.

 

 

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The SD Jam knot takes some work and alot of hand strength.

I do them for Bluefish leaders with 80# test. It takes me awhile to do them. My hands are strong; I play bass and have large hands and the 80# really kicks my butt doing them.

Make sure you lube the knot before you cinch everything down.

Keep at it.

If you'd like I can post a video of my technique. Getting the placing right does alot to help.

 

Hi fishbulb,

 

I for one would like to see your video.

Thanks,

Fox

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The trick to properly tying the San Diego Knot in heavier line is having a solid "hook anchor" to pull against.

Most San Diego long-range boats have some kind of solidly-set ring, or at least a loop of tuna cord in a convenient spot just for that use.

A surfcaster near a vehicle has any number of options for anchoring the hook, but just standing alone on the sand it is a little tricky to get it right with anything above 50 pound test.

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I use the San Diego and Double San Diego for most everything up to 50#. 5-7 turns, lots of spit, and a long tag end usually helps so it doesn't bunch up before cinching it down. With a Double San Diego you'll have your tag end and also loop tag end to snip off. I like the double but the single works when we have to do a quick re-tie during a wide open bite.

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jesus.. 80 lb mono?

What size hook are you tying these onto?

im using 5/0 - 6/0 octopus gomatsus

and a few mustads :o of the same size ><

 

 

Your tying the hooks to 50 pound mono which will be attached to 20 pound mono which will be attached to 40 pound braid main line?

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The heaviest leader i have ever used was 40 pound nylon but i found 30 will handle fish and rays in excess of 35+ pounds. That's everyday fishing at inlets over the last 10 years. In Jersey i fished 20 pound fireline the majority of times and used 20 or 30 pound leaders at the most with no issues. The Fireline in 20 and 30 pound break in the 50's so i never had any issues with strength.

 

I have at times used the San Diego Jam with leaders up to 40 pound with no problems( its basically just an upside down improved clinch). Why don't you try tying it with 20 and move up after you get a feel for it. After you put the line through the hook etc..leave a long tag end, then pinch both strands of line(with your left index and thumb) if your a righty, and start looping around both strands of line with your right hand with the tag end toward the hook eye( sometimes your teeth can hold the line end that wraps around) when you get close to the hook eye bring the end through the exposed loop and up through the top loop and cinch up.

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Here's another view "tied at sea" aboard the San Diego overnight boat Pacific Queen.

Most boats have a solid ring or other place to anchor your hook/lure so that you don't have to use a rod guide, but some kind of anchor makes the whole operation MUCH easier.

The 5-turns are usually what beginners are told to use so that they can get the rest of the mechanics down easily.

In general, 40-60 pound line uses 6 turns, and 80-100 use 5 turns.

In lighter line you can go as much as 7 turns, but this knot is mainly for 40-100 mono/fluoro.

The "Double San Diego" is a bulkier knot, and is used mainly for trolling [or winning knot contests].

The "Jam" part of the name was added about 15 years ago, and for more than 40 years it was just called "The San Diego", and not surprisingly, seems to originate from the late, great, Bill Poole.

I've also seen it published in SWS, etc from time to time as "The Tuna Knot".

 

 

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