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gyess

Do Manufacturers Spline Rod Blanks for Factory Rods?

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Wonder why they don't? Could be a good thing to market, and I would feel better about buying a factory rod. Thoughts on this one?

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Time equals money and finding the sweet spot on a rod takes time. Manufacturers would have to charge more for a factory built rod if they took the time to build it properly. The average angler doesn't notice the difference, or care about it either. Lamiglass, I think, is the only large producer of rods that takes the time to find out where the guides should be placed on each individual blank.

 

Valentine

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The vast majority of manufacturers and modern builders build on a blanks straightest axis. It has been proven that for spinners it makes no difference but for conventional builds it does. Now if you were able to fish a rod in one plane that would work with the spine of the rod that would be one thing, but a few degrees to the right or left and your working against the spine on the rod anyway. This subject has been thoroughly discussed and can be found in the archives.

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First off only two companys I know of making factory built rods spine the blanks one is St Croix, No other companys do it! That said spine doesn't matter at all any how! Now as for lamiglas and guide layouts... ha ha... They are the worst offenders of bad guide layouts. Here's one for you.. How many companys have tags hanging off the guides that say Fuji Concept system?? Quite a few.. How many are really Concept layouts?? NONE!! They use Concept style guides like Fuji K's and do a Cone of Flight.. badly I might add!! There is one company that is building true Concept guide layouts with Concept style guides. Think it doesn't matter? Think again!!

 

Why do they do this?? Cost! It would take less then a minute to spine a blank! But add one or two more guides and that costs money!! The guides cost $$ the thread cost $$ and four more wraps a person will need to do cost $$.. so they let you think your getting the latest and greatest but.. are you?? On a blank like a GSB you don't really need a concept set up (it wouldn't hurt) But on a Arra or SSU they should and do need that extra support. Look at the 108 Arra and the 4 guides.. tips were breaking. They changed to 5 which still is not great but the breakage went away!! Hmmmmm!!! This isn't a bash on Lamiglas nearly all of them do it!!

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St.Croix building on spine, that's news to me. Jason Brunner stated a while back on this site that they build on the straightest axis and explained the reasoning behind it. He said in true life conditions it's impossible to fish a rod in one plane that works with the spine of the rod ( unless your a robot and are perfectly consistent) and that's why they build on the blanks straightest axis. There has been countless discussions , especially over the last 10 to 15 years on this, and it's one topic that generates stronger than usual opinions and emotions, a search can keep you reading for days lol.

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All interesting. Tested my 2-6 Mojo and it was pretty off. Can't see how taking a moment to spline the top part would add cost. It already has about 10 guides on it. I checked factory surf and jetty lami built on a GSB 1201L blank at a shop. The guides were off almost 45 degrees. Sort of makes me appreciate a custom build and not sure if a shop wants me going through their stock to find a factory stick that is built to the spline.

 

I will do search on this site but I would think building to the spline would aid in loading while casting.

 

Appreciate the replies guys.

 

GY

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The last several rods I have built had a very distinct spine, and very sharply defined over just a few degrees. I lined up the guides with that axis, but in truth, I don't really cast on the axis of the guides. So maybe it will be better for rod strength when fighting a fish, but should have no impact on my casting. On one rod I actually put the guides 90 degrees off the strong axis reasoning that it would cast more accurately and that rod (SSU1081M) was plenty strong enough already to fight any fish.

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St.Croix building on spine, that's news to me. Jason Brunner stated a while back on this site that they build on the straightest axis and explained the reasoning behind it. He said in true life conditions it's impossible to fish a rod in one plane that works with the spine of the rod ( unless your a robot and are perfectly consistent) and that's why they build on the blanks straightest axis. There has been countless discussions , especially over the last 10 to 15 years on this, and it's one topic that generates stronger than usual opinions and emotions, a search can keep you reading for days lol.

 

You are correct. I never said they build on the spine. When the blanks are stripped of cello they are bent and they mark the butt where the "spine is. after that they build to the straightest axis. My blanks are done the same way as St Croix, marked on the butt after they are stripped. Now this is only done on 1pc blanks. The only thing done on 2pc is the blanks are bent and checked for defects and sent to the sander and checked again. As we know the spine is meaning less and emotions or not until someone can prove different factorys and alot of custom builders won't bother building on it!!

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I was told by the St Croix rep that building on the spine was " old fashioned". They are lining the blank up so it looks good at the store. I have been properly spining my rods for the past 40 years and will continue to do it the proper,old fashioned way, and find the spine on my blanks. To me it seems very important; for casting accuracy, and for stress when fighting the big fish. I would never buy any factory rod that was wrapped arbitrarily in relation to the spine.

Steve

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It won't.

 

A rod built at some arbitrary angle to the spine will load and unload at that arbitrary angle during the cast.

 

Spine; not spline.

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You are correct. I never said they build on the spine. When the blanks are stripped of cello they are bent and they mark the butt where the "spine is. after that they build to the straightest axis. My blanks are done the same way as St Croix, marked on the butt after they are stripped. Now this is only done on 1pc blanks. The only thing done on 2pc is the blanks are bent and checked for defects and sent to the sander and checked again. As we know the spine is meaning less and emotions or not until someone can prove different factorys and alot of custom builders won't bother building on it!!

 

 

I misread spining a blank as being built on spine. My fault:(:(

 

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