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TimS

Are rich people less ethical?

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I think the middle class is often the most ethical because they have more to lose than poor people,



and less ability to cover it up like rich people.



 



 



people are people.



 



money often is a means of allowing you to be who you really are.


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Hey boss, make it big enough to read, it's the ethical thing to do.

 

+1. These eyes just aren't up to it. :(

 

But, to the OP, ethics know no class structure. We see unethical behavior in every social strata. But greed in the upper echelon tends to be very pronounced, hence the increased notice. The financial 'adviser' who embezzles a hundred million is far more noticeable than the clerk who embezzles a 'measly' eighty thousand. :squid:

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Roadrunner View Post

 

The financial 'adviser' who embezzles a hundred million is far more noticeable than the clerk who embezzles a 'measly' eighty thousand. cwm13.gif

 

that worked to their advantage in the past.

 

 

 

often times a company wouldn't want the scandal that prosecuting the crime would create.....

 

but the low level crime would be prosecuted.

 

 

 

times have changed though.

 

 

 

 

 

my point was that for an unethical person, fear of getting caught and fear of loss probably exists more in the middle class.....

 

poor people have less to lose,

 

and rich people can buy favorable results.

 

 

 

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I think it's an individual thing when it comes to ethics. I remember reading books on types of ethics and I thought morals outweighed the ethics especially when I realized what is ethical contradicts what I think is moral.

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+1. These eyes just aren't up to it. :(

But, to the OP, ethics know no class structure. We see unethical behavior in every social strata. But greed in the upper echelon tends to be very pronounced, hence the increased notice. The financial 'adviser' who embezzles a hundred million is far more noticeable than the clerk who embezzles a 'measly' eighty thousand. :squid:

 

 

 

 

that worked to their advantage in the past.

 

often times a company wouldn't want the scandal that prosecuting the crime would create.....

but the low level crime would be prosecuted.

 

times have changed though.

 

 

my point was that for an unethical person, fear of getting caught and fear of loss probably exists more in the middle class.....

poor people have less to lose,

and rich people can buy favorable results.

 

 

does any of this explain the candy thiefs?

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A cheater is a cheater, no matter what kind of car he drives.

A thief is still a thief if he wears a custom tailored Italian suit with his initials stitched on the cuffs, or hand me down Good Will cast offs.

 

Wealth will get you out of sometimes, but if you are truly a bad guy, sooner or later you will do something stupid that you can't shake. See O.J. Simpson.

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I do a fair amount of work on boats in the 40-55 foot range. Lately I've had problems getting paid by some of these customers, something you don't see from the fisherman running a 25-30 footer.

 

I get the feeling they somehow feel entitled, to what I'm not sure. :squid:

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Ok so I took a look at the first link ( live science - rich people cheat) study was performed by a Berkley professor (well speculate the potential bias right there). He performed two studies, one observing drivers on the streets of San Fran and the candy jar study.

 

Outcome, people in fancier cars were rude. San fran rich elite liberals were beahiving rudely, not possible;)

candy jar test Pfft! volunteers told to imagine themsleves as 1% took more candy. Not sure about the strength of that test to instill confidence to asign a type of behavior to wealthy individuals.

 

Rude drivers

 

In two tests conducted in a natural setting, scientists examined a simple example of unethical behavior on the road — how likely it would be for drivers in the San Francisco Bay Area to cut in front of other vehicles at a busy four-way intersection and cut off pedestrians at a crosswalk. They estimated the social class of drivers based on vehicle make, age and appearance, and discovered that drivers of upper-class cars cut off other cars and pedestrians more often.

 

Four lab tests that included undergraduates at Berkeley and national online samples of adults revealed those who considered themselves upper class had greater tendencies to make unethical decisions. This included unrightfully stealing something, lying in a negotiation, cheating at a game of chance to boost their chances of winning cash or endorsing unethical behavior at work, such as stealing cash, receiving bribes and overcharging customers.

 

"This isn't just a case of upper socioeconomic people being more willing to admit that they would be unethical," Piff said. "We actually measure cheating behavior — not just 'Would you do something unethical' but 'Do you do it?'"

 

All these lab findings held true regardless of participants' ages, gender, ethnicity, religiosity and political orientation. [8 Ways Religion Impacts Your Life]

 

"I was surprised at the consistency and strength of all these effects — upper-class individuals often acted unethically three to four times more often than lower-class individuals," Piff told LiveScience.

 

Are some rich people inherently evil?

 

Another lab experiment revealed that unethical behavior was not necessarily inherent to individuals. The researchers had volunteers compare themselves with people with the most or least money, education and respected jobs, thereby subtly putting them into the mindset of someone with a relatively low or high socioeconomic status. When then presented with a jar of candy ostensibly for kids in a nearby lab, those made to feel as if they were upper class took more candy that would otherwise go to children, findings that suggest the experience of higher social class might nudge one to act unethically.

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