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Quahogs

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Out on the water this afternoon raking for Quahogs and many that I raked up were whole, but empty inside. I would say the vast majority of the Quahog I raked up were that way. I took me several hours to just get 3/4 of a basket.

 

I spoke to the warden about that and he had no answer, Brother Bob or Robb22 have you ever come across such a thing and perhaps the reason>

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Sometimes when a quahog relay is done the shellfish don't adapt well and die.....there was a few hundred bushel dumped off patuwissit/ Barlow's landing 10 years ago or so that did not do well at all.....as a matter of fact we never found them......Anchor frost from a bad winter can get em' too.....even in 4-5 ft of water at MLW......Other than that it would be disease or predators.........Hope you still got your peck.........

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Thanks for the comeback Robb

 

Would the Moon snails be able to clean out the meat without opening them up. Both shells were closed, no sand , just plain empty.

 

I had to give up before I could rake a full peck, my lungs gave out on me .

 

John the piles are gone for the most part , but they are deeper in the sand for some reason. As ong as I could apply pressure I was able to reach them, but once my lungs gave out I lose all my strength and it becomes more difficult

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Yes it can but you should see a little drill hole in the quahog as moon snails drill a hole in there victim and the suck the meat out......otherwise I am guessing disease....were you fishing a transplant area???......

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What Rob said. If those quahogs were from transfer stock, then there were bound to be a lot of damaged ones when they were planted. They get damaged in transit. Fully grown, hinged empty shells are ordinarily what you find.

As Rob also said, moon snails could also be the culprit. They make a distinctive tiny beveled hole near the hinge. Also keep in mind, pretty much every native crab we have eats quahogs. The clue there is, chipped edges of the shell.

 

But my guess might be QPX or quahog parasite unknown. These can really go through a setr of quahogs, and what you described Carl, is pretty much what you find. Mortality often occurs in spring and later summer.

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Once again thank you both for this enlightening information. Yes this is a transplanted stock.

 

I will attempt to pay closer attention to the shell next time. I have not seen any MOon snails, but we do have plenty of Crabs

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Once again thank you both for this enlightening information. Yes this is a transplanted stock.

I will attempt to pay closer attention to the shell next time. I have not seen any MOon snails, but we do have plenty of Crabs

 

Carl,

 

If those are transfer stock quahogs, then that's undoubtedly what it is. Transfer stock quahogs arrive in 100lb onion or canvas bags. The folks delivering them often handle them very rough, and the unfortunate quahogs on the bottom often get either crushed or cracked due to being dropped on the ground or into a boat. They die shortly thereafter, hence all the hinged, empty shells.

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