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Thoughts on music. I'll ask again

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So we're 75 years into music being distributed as mass media.  Millions of people have heard thousands and thousands of songs from hundreds of artists, or maybe thousands.  All the music will be preserved.



 



What will people be listening to from our modern era?



 



300 years ago, an elite few people listened to and had the opportunity to pass on the music of a very few.  We now have only the general style of the music of "the people"-the jig n reel (became country), the tale, or ballad (became folk), and classical.  Think of classical-did we hear it all?  Did some Mozart fans squash out a great writer because he was an A hole, or he threw crummy parties?  Maybe.



 



What will they love from pop music, or jazz, or whatever, from 1940 to now, three hundred years from now?



 



 



I'll name one person.  Elvis Presley.  Some will disagree, but he brought the Delta blues and rock to the USA-right or wrong (music folks found a white boy that sang like black singers)..



 



Well?


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Just a thought: in the modern era, we celebrate the performers as much, if not more, than the writers. In fact, most well-know songs today are written by people other than the performers and are complete unknowns. So comparing today's music with yesteryear's is a bit of apples vs oranges.

 

That being said, the stuff that will be discussed in history books will generally be the starters of movements: Elvis, The Beatles, etc. Acts that will still be listened to will generally be the those that have large volumes of work and are capable of producing unique, lasting melodies...

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Delta blues will probably be discovered and rediscovered forever.Interest in Elvis' music (and movies) will probably die out with the Ed Sullivan generation.

Rockabilly guys swear that there were a dozen or so artists that did what Elvis did, but Elvis hit the jackpot by getting the widespread exposure on TV.

Jimi Hendrix took music to a new place.There has been a steady and constant growth in the appreciation of his creativity and genius ever since we first heard the strange sounds of Purple Haze on the radio way back in the day. His emergence as the alpha musical genius of rock is clearer with every passing year and decade.

Yeah,I think that folks will be listening to Hendrix and enjoying his music far into the future. 


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Delta blues will probably be discovered and rediscovered forever.Interest in Elvis' music (and movies) will probably die out with the Ed Sullivan generation.

 

Rockabilly guys swear that there were a dozen or so artists that did what Elvis did, but Elvis hit the jackpot by getting the widespread exposure on TV.

 

I agree with that. Others have done it better before and since. I think Elvis was more the Colonel than anything else.

 

 

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Quote:


Rockabilly guys swear that there were a dozen or so artists that did what Elvis did, but Elvis hit the jackpot by getting the widespread exposure on TV.



A great story.  Sam Phillips despised Jerry Lee Lewis.  He wanted Carl Perkins to record Whole Lotta Shakin (he wrote it, but johnny Cash always swore he did).   Phillips called Perkins to come back to Memphis to do the song.  He wrecked his car on the way and broke a bone in his back.  Phillips didn't want to wait anymore and let Lewis do the song.



 



So. 330 years from now a guy goes on itunes.  What does he buy from "now"?



 



 



John Lennon ( apres Beatles) will be absolutely forgotten.  He might buy Nirvana, I say.



 



Miles yes.  Dizzy Gillespie yes.  Duke Ellington.



 


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Quote:

Originally Posted by charloots View Post

 

I agree with that. Others have done it better before and since. I think Elvis was more the Colonel than anything else.

 

I think elvis was the real deal.  I also believe he was the very first music celebrity  to buy the myth of rock n roll superstardom (partly thanks to Parker).  I wonder what Elvis would have played had Colonel Tom not come along..  i am growing old and nostalgic so i do enjoy hearing an OLD Elvis tune, but I truly love his gospel music.

 

 

 

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Certainly Sam Phillips changed not only music and what that generation listened to, but eventually on a larger scale, the way the nation viewed racial differences.

 

The Chess brothers in Chicago did as well. They started out with "Race Music", but found it appealed to kids of all colors.

 

Wolfman Jack exposed a lot of this "Race Music" to a generation, and he used Howlin' Wolf's voice to do it.

 

Performers like Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Little Walter, etc would perform, and there would be ropes to separate the "black" are and the "white" area. The ropes would come down part way during the performance, and the kids would mingle and dance together. Shocking, I know.

 

300 years from now, I think people will still be listening to the Blues.

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Whatever passes on, will likely be traced back to the blacks.

Whether it's Chicago Rhythm and Blues like Muddy or Little Walter, or the Rolling Stones interpretations, or interpreters of the Stones. It's what we call rock n roll. And I think it will age well.

 

And like it or not, some derivative of hip hop. It's here to stay. And the white kids have co-opted to fit their audience.

M+M is the new pat Boone. :b:

 

Country will still be around. I'm not sure what form it will take. Hopefully the Bakersfield sound will bury Nashville, but I doubt it.

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So. 330 years from now a guy goes on itunes.  What does he buy from "now"?

 

 

John Lennon ( apres Beatles) will be absolutely forgotten.  He might buy Nirvana, I say.

 

Miles yes.  Dizzy Gillespie yes.  Duke Ellington.

 

 

People don't buy Miles, Dizzy, Duke, etc. now. Sure Kind of Blue still sells. it's easy to digest. The masses aren't buying Nefertiti now, what would make anyone think that 300 years from now will be any different? Arts education is in the crapper. People are being fed a diet of the musical equivalent of McDonald's and Twinkies. If it doesn't have a back-beat and a hook music is lost on people. The CD market is almost non-existent requiring new music to be formatted to the constraints of MP3 downloads. Nobody downloads an entire Ellington suite. I can't imagine how bad it will be in 300 years. And let's say there is some kind of turnaround and people begin to understand and appreciate music again, I sure hope they're able to get past 1959.

 

 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Apollo's Boss View Post

 

People don't buy Miles, Dizzy, Duke, etc. now. Sure Kind of Blue still sells. it's easy to digest. The masses aren't buying Nefertiti now, what would make anyone think that 300 years from now will be any different? Arts education is in the crapper. People are being fed a diet of the musical equivalent of McDonald's and Twinkies. If it doesn't have a back-beat and a hook music is lost on people. The CD market is almost non-existent requiring new music to be formatted to the constraints of MP3 downloads. Nobody downloads an entire Ellington suite. I can't imagine how bad it will be in 300 years. And let's say there is some kind of turnaround and people begin to understand and appreciate music again, I sure hope they're able to get past 1959.

 

Another part of the equation I left out.

 

The history is written by the eggheads, the scholars.  They will have some influence.  People will turn to their writings to see what they "should like", or listen to.

 

 

 

Either that, or the question is maybe, what will the scholars see as important from our time?

 

 

 

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Either that, or the question is maybe, what will the scholars see as important from our time?

 

 

That's a very different question, indeed. The place to start would be musicians/composers who could be considered mile posts. In jazz, Louis Armstrong, Duke, Monk and Bird, Miles, Coltrane/Ornette, and perhaps some of the AACM. Ellington and Mingus could also be placed in the pantheon of great American composers such as Aaron Copland, Ives, etc.

 

The European Classical canon is already well established and won't change.

 

Rock starts with Chuck Berry/Elvis. Then you arrive at the Beatles, then Hendrix. I'm sure I'm leaving out others that might be considered mile posts of rock, but it's not my thing, so maybe someone else could add to that.

 

After establishing the mile posts, we can fill in others who, while not "game changers" so to speak, made great contributions. An example might be Handel. He was no JS Bach but he's still worth checking out. A rock equivalent might be the Stones.

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Dylan.



 



You leave Dylan out of the equation, and you're missing a lot.



Elvis had two, maybe three good years of making music worth listening to, most of the rest was absolute ****. Plus, he was mostly putting his own spin on other people's stuff - nothing self-penned, with the possible exception of the so-personal-it-hurts autobiography "In The Ghetto."  Nothing near the lyrical quality of a cat like Chuck Berry.



 



And without Dylan, The Beatles are still singing "Love Me Do." Granted, a nice, catchy tune, but nothing like what they wrote later. Hendrix openly worshiped the dude...



 



Delta blues...yeah...Louis Armstrong, for sure...both timeless.


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