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mikejd

Fly patterns central NY in May.

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Guys When I am upstate chenango/Madison county turkey hunting in May I spend my afternoons trout fishing. Can some of you guys recommend any fly patterns for this time frame and area.

 

Thanks.

Mike

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Not sure what rivers you will be fishing however the Hendricksons should be popping. Nymph fishing with gold ribbed hares ears, pheasant tail nymphs, terrestrials on warm/windy days, streamers etc. You can't go wrong with any of them. Cast and blast is a nice way to spend May.

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As Grousechaser gave you good advice for the basics and Hendrickson's hatching in the afternoons are good bet when you're there.

 

There are traditional Catskill style dry flies (with a hackle collar) for these hatches as well as other versions such as comparadun, thorax style and parachute versions for each of these hatches which sit lower in the film that might more effective.

 

Some dark colored dries to match

Blue Wing Olives 18 hatch all day with brownish olive bodies and gray wings

Hendricksons (female) with pinkish tan body and gray wings and Red Quills (male) with dark brown bodies and gray wings hatch in the afternoon size 14,

Gray Fox size 12 hatch afternoons (tan body, gray wings)

 

and some lighter colored dries for

Light Cahills 14 hatch afternoon have creamy yellow body, light gray wings

and owards end of May you might also run into Sulphurs size 16 hatch afternoon have creamy yellow to orange tinged bodies and light gray wings

 

Depending where you'll be fishing you should also have a bunch of caddis hatches going on so having some caddis dries dries is a good idea, but you may have more luck swing wet flies to imitate emerging caddis pupa since the adults don't sit on the water long. Swinging a Lafontaines Deep Sparkle Pupa down and across are a good bet if you have them (or if you have wet flies like a Lead Wing Coachman or soft hackles like a Partridge and Green that might be close enough if you already have them):.

 

Black size 18 Dry= Black CDC and Elk or Black Elk Hair Caddis, Pupa= Black LaFontaines Deep Sparkle Pupa

Green size 16 Dry= dark deer hair wing, olive body, pupa Brown and Bright Green Deep Sparkle Pupa

Tan size 14-16 Dry= Light elk hair wing, tan body Pupa= Bright Green Deep Sparkle Pupa

 

 

All of the above mayflies and caddis should be hatching in May in most of the streams in central NY when you're up there. Good luck!

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Mikejd,

 

There is an fly shop in East Syracuse called "The Troutfitter" and I'm sure the owner will be able to point ou to the best water and what flys to use. They might have an on line site with trout reports. Also if there is a fly shop near you, pick up one of those free copies of a magazine most shop have available. Go to the Central NY section and there should be a lost of streams and rivers and the type of flys you shuld use in the spring.

 

That is beattiful country. Check out fly shops near Utica, NY as well. There is a great tailwater fishery, just north of Utica, below a dam that feeds into the Erie Canal/Mohawk River.. It's been 20 years since I fished that country, so excuse my vagueness. there aren't many fly shops, so you should beable to ferret a couple out not far from you Turkey hunting spots.

 

If I remember the name of the tail water I'll post it here. There is a C&R section for throphy trout in that river.

 

If someone else knows it, feel free to jump in and supply it.

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Turkey season in NY is the whole month of May. You will probably get different hatches in the first week than the last. It also depends where you are in upstate NY.  The hatches differ in timing between Duchess and Chenango county. 



Most of the month there will be small brown caddis (size 18) early and olive caddis (rhycophila) (size 14) later. Later in May there will probably be sulphurs (size 18) and maybe even green drakes (huge) and isonychia. 



 



General rule is darker mayflies earlier and lighter mayflies later. 



 



May is fly fishing month with plenty of different hatches. 



 



Of course, if all else fails there is always a wooly bugger. 


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Mike,

 

The stream is called West Canada Creek and it flows south from Hinckley Resivoir into the Mohawk River/Erie Canal.

 

Mike,

 

I found this info in my research papers of the Utica Area for one of my columns in 2004..

 

You might find this an interesting part of NY State to take a side trip going or coming to your Turkey hunting.

 

Enjoy.

 

In fact All of you enjoy!

 

 

The West Canada Creek, once used as a primary transportation route of logging, is now a tail water fishery and home to Brown, Brook, Rainbow Trout and native Smallmouth Bass. The West Canada is actually one of the ten longest rivers in the Adirondack Park flowing south into the Mohawk River in Herkimer. Although the Creek name would suppose its size, the West Canada is far from a creek. Average width outside the Park ranges from 80 to 100 feet wide. Tannic acid from decay of pin needles and occasional Iron Ore veins make the color of the creek similar to that of a glass of ice tea. To those anglers who have fished in Labrador or the Adirondacks, feel right at home fishing in this beautiful fishery. Although still a tail water fishery from Hinckley Reservoir in the town of Trenton, upstream the creek is a freestone wonder, highly susceptible to ultra low levels in the summer. From Hinckley down the creek is regulated, by three holding ponds. Very large trout can be found in these pools, but cannot be fished without some sort of watercraft. Each season someone pulls out an extremely huge fish from the base of the dam, and throughout the season one can watch the string of pearl rise forms as trout rise in the giant pools worthy of being called lakes.

 

From these pools down stream the creek flows from Trenton falls bridge to the junction of Cincinnati creek. This section is also known as the fly only or trophy section. Technically, this is a single hook, no bait, catch and release zone. Some of the biggest fish in the creek have been caught in this section, but bear in mind that most people tend to fish this area, probably because of the name "trophy section. Just below the Cincinnati Creek is Putnam Road access. This is a great place to put in canoes or drift boats. You will need to lower them down a steep bank, but with a few people it is quite easy, and one-person can easily lower canoes and kick boats. From this put in one can drift down to the next bridge, some time known as Comstock Bridge or Bottom Partridge Hill Access. This is a great drift and can easily be fished in three hours, straight drifted in less than on hour.

 

The Oriskany Creek is probably one of the best local streams near the Fly Shop. In its upper stretches near Oriskany Falls, this creek has native Brown Trout, good hatches, and typical small stream conditions. Stocked trout become the norm farther downstream closer to Clinton, NY. Typical trout are in the 10-15 inch class, however 20 inch trout can be found. Hatches are good, featuring a great Sulphur, Tan Caddis, BWO, and Trico hatch. Due to extensive farming in its flood plain, levels go up quick after a rain, but tend to fall rapidly. Call for details on current conditions

 

The Sauquoit would be considered Rising Trout's only Urban Fishery. It features Brook Trout in its headwaters and Stocked Brown Trout from the town of Washington Mills downstream to Whitesboro. In NY Mills, you will see the Sauquoit flow right behind our fly shop. Here, many an evening has been spent on this body of water prospecting with a dry fly. The wading is very easy, depth is shallow, and trout are always eager to take a dry. Thanks to Trout Unlimited, there is even Handicap Access just off Route 8. Featuring a great Hendrickson, Sulphur, Trico, caddis and flying ant hatch, this stream never lets us down. Unfortunately many people who do not appreciate the outdoors, tend to leave garbage near the bank, so if you go please do your part and bring a small bag to pick up an occasional soda can or cigarette butt.

 

Sconondoa Creek I will probably be hung just for mentioning this beautiful stream. It hold some of the most beautiful small brown trout in the entire Mohawk Valley. It is very small and virtually un-fishable after June. This stream features a great Hendrickson Hatch and is the first body of water in our area to release the hatch. Although the regulations state that this is not a catch and release fishery, one fisherman could ruin this entire fishery. Please practice catch and release on this body of water.

 

The Black River is one of the longest northern flowing rivers in NYS. The water in this river has the look, smell and feel of the Adirondack Mountains. Beginning near Remsen the Upper stretches of the Black river down North Lake Road holds an abundance of brook trout and an occasional Brown, with intermingled Rainbow . The upper river is mostly pocket water seasoned with deep pools and undercut banks. Bedrock being mostly granite, the glacial till produces difficult wading. The confluents of this section flow into the main branch in Boonville where the Brookies begin to take a back seat to the browns and rainbows. Many sections like Edmonds Road, Hawkinsville, and Norton Road offer some great dry fly fishing. Main hatches in this river are Sulphurs, Quills, Isonychias, Green Drakes, White flies, BWO's and all types of caddis and stoneflies. In the summer, drought conditions can turn this river into a Smallmouth fishery in the day light hours and Trout water in the evenings and early mornings. Be sure to carry Muddler Minnows and Wooly Buggers to fish the deep holes. No matter where you go, keep a lookout for the occasional big resident brown who may dimple in the shallows near a hidden deep pocket. This river can surprise you, and would be considered a close second to the West Canada in beauty and quality of fishing.

 

Fish Creek is one of those un-fished, kind of unknown fisheries. Rising Trout does not guide on this body of water at all, but many customers have told us of the great White Fly and Green Drake hatches on this stream. Mostly accessible by the Hardin Furniture plant in McConallsiville. It would be a good idea to bring a wading staff, as the large erratic boulders can accidentally cool you off on a short fishing adventure.

 

Nine Mile Creek flowing out of Holland Patent is one of the best Smallmouth Bass fisheries close to Utica. On River Road in Marcy an angler can park here and fish down to the Barge Canal. On occasion a brown trout will get intermingled in with the Bass. Keep a look out for tailing carp, which can be delivered a clouser minnow or wooly bugger. Shown in the picture on left. An 8 lb carp on a 5 or 6 weight can bring lots of fun in a hurry. Easily fished with a canoe or kick boat, good fishing can last long into the evening. Pike and Musky will also venture into the flats at the delta of this river. Be prepared, a good angler in a boat will bring along a 10 weight fly rod, rigged with a wire bite guard and large diver style fly for these behemoth fish.

 

 

I forget who the writer was. it could have come from the local county tourist board??

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Rising Trout was a fly shop in Utica owned by JP Ross, and I think this article was on the website. The West Canada is great, but is a tailwater, so check Waterline before you go, the power co. can make changes any time. Used to be a lot of big browns in the trophy section.

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Wow, this if fun to think back on. From grad school in late 60's until mother-in-law passed ten years ago, I spent a lot of time on the small streams mostly between Chittengango and Skaneateles. (The best was Nine Mile Creek in Syracuse.) Fish on all of them could be frustratingly selective, but otherwise a sparse #16 tan caddis was a good go-to fly when in doubt--as it is everywhere. A black fur ant saved me on Skaneateles Creek, Patriot over on West Canada, and a personal variation I called the Hendrickson submerger (dun trying to crawl back into nymph case) on Chittenango above the falls.

 

I agree that The Troutfitter in E. Syracuse is a great shop. Wayne will fix you up.

 

Steve

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Wayne is also an expert on Cape Cod in June and bonefish in de winter, Mon. A really dedicted fish chaser and a good man. He sold me my first 8 wt for saltwater fishing in 1996. It was a kit rod with a SA System 2 reel. I caught a lot of fish with that rod for about 8 years. When heading to Harker's Island in 2005 I had a flat on the NJ TP. I pulled the rod case with that rod in it and placed it on the top of my wagon. Changed the tire, loaded the flat and the pile of equipment into the back and jumped into the south bound traffic flow and excellerated to 65. I heard a thump from the back window and saw the rod case bouncing down the lane behind me. In a heartbeat a Perdue Truck ate that tube and rod with at least 8 or more of it's 18 wheels. I pulled over and walked a far piece back and recovered the tube and rod. Crushed is the only description that fits. The two piece rod came out looking like an old umbrella frame. The ferule wraps held the shattered strips of rod together. I tosssed it in a dumster when I got gas going down Route 13 in Virgina. I still have the System2 reel and use it. A decent design tht is rugged and easy to maintain.

 

Sometimes a good memory is a curse and sometimes it is fun.

 

 

For you guys looking for striped bass reports in the Hudson River here is the River Basin Sports Shop's March 21, 2012, commentary on Striped bass and herring as far north as Catskill, NY.

 

The games have begun for 2012.

 

Afternoon reports from the river today continued to tell of plentiful herring, and perhaps somewhat fewer stripers up to about 32 inches in length, with a couple perhaps around the 40 inch range. Plenty of herring and striper action down around the Kingston area also. The herring at the Roe-Jan are reported to be jumbo size and we’ve had confirmed herring reports from as far upriver as New Baltimore. Bethlehem still seems to be lacking any such action but that should be changing at any time now. The Hudson – Stockport area seems to have a particularly fairly good number of stripers around. We’ll keep you posted. Tom G.

 

 

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