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RhodyFisher

Epoxy Sealing

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I am just starting out in plug building, and I have been reading a lot about various sealing methods before priming. I think I am going to seal with Etex, diluted 2:1 with denatured alcohol. What I am wondering is, what is a preferred method of applying the seal? Dipping? or brushing on? Does one method work better than the other?


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Sudsy did the definitive tutorial on epoxy sealing, a search should find it, but I use his basic method, which is this....Fully sand and drill the blank, pop it into a toaster oven set at ~ 200 deg. for a few minutes while you mix a batch of etex. The warm plug will make the etex plenty thin to work with. Brush or pour the etex into all the holes and over the surface, set aside for a few to let it soak in, re-hit any dry looking areas (end grain especially) and let sit for a few. Wipe off any excess from surface, eye holes, weight holes, hook holes and I use a coat hanger to clean the thru hole out. Rubber gloves and a steady supply of lint free shop rags makes this much easier. Let the plug cure overnight and it's ready for sanding, primer, paint and top coat.

I think the advantages way outweigh the sticky epoxy mess, I don't need any other nasty chemicals hanging around since I already use etex to topcoat, I can continue working on the plug the next day, the etex firms up the soft wood surface and makes a great base for primer. It does add a slight bit of weight. Plugs come out tough as hell.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Ed White View Post

 

Sudsy did the definitive tutorial on epoxy sealing, a search should find it, but I use his basic method, which is this....Fully sand and drill the blank, pop it into a toaster oven set at ~ 200 deg. for a few minutes while you mix a batch of etex. The warm plug will make the etex plenty thin to work with. Brush or pour the etex into all the holes and over the surface, set aside for a few to let it soak in, re-hit any dry looking areas (end grain especially) and let sit for a few. Wipe off any excess from surface, eye holes, weight holes, hook holes and I use a coat hanger to clean the thru hole out. Rubber gloves and a steady supply of lint free shop rags makes this much easier. Let the plug cure overnight and it's ready for sanding, primer, paint and top coat.

 

I think the advantages way outweigh the sticky epoxy mess, I don't need any other nasty chemicals hanging around since I already use etex to topcoat, I can continue working on the plug the next day, the etex firms up the soft wood surface and makes a great base for primer. It does add a slight bit of weight. Plugs come out tough as hell.

 

Ed, How much sanding can you do after the sealing?  JMR

 

 

 

 

 

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I've been epoxy sealing for quite awhile. GENERALLY, I test plugs nekid. (The plug, not me). I find that the water the plug absorbs while doing a short test is pretty close to the weight the epoxy seal adds. YMMV of course.

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I also seal with epoxy and love it. I heat the plug (after mixing and thinning the etex). I pour etex down the through hole first then brush on the outside making sure every area of the plug gets hit with it. When pouring it down the through hole, I am pretty generous with the amount I put through it letting it seep from the belly hook hole and eyes. Let sit for maybe 5-10 minutes then wipe off the excess. Hang to dry sand a little the prime and paint.

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