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Fossil Help

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Long shot but it may work. Does anybody here know anything about fossils? In particular, Appalachian fossils from close to the PA, NY border in Bradford County PA? Few summers ago I was up there wading the river for smallies and I came across this fossil, and ever since then I have had no leads whatsoever on what it could be. My guess is that its pretty rare, as its not in ANY common fossil books or publications. Here's a few pictures. Its in a shale layer, more specifically a red shale layer (very distinct within this sample).

[img=a><a href=http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/3257762/width/523/height/700' alt='700'>

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You're half an hour's drive from world-class paleontologists at the Academy of Natural Sciences or Penn or the Franklin Institute and you're asking the SOL tenured faculty of stoopid this question? Start with a call or an e-mail and then drive in to Philadelphia. Worst case: you'll have visited a cool museum or two. The WIKI force in SOL is strong, but for dating pre-Cambrian shale, I'd go someplace with drawers and display cases full of fossils and the people who know about them.

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You're half an hour's drive from world-class paleontologists at the Academy of Natural Sciences or Penn or the Franklin Institute and you're asking the SOL tenured faculty of stoopid this question? Start with a call or an e-mail and then drive in to Philadelphia. Worst case: you'll have visited a cool museum or two. The WIKI force in SOL is strong, but for dating pre-Cambrian shale, I'd go someplace with drawers and display cases full of fossils and the people who know about them.

 

While that may be good advice, I think Intrepid nailed it with rebar. :D

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I think it's a crinoid stem. Maybe you used to find something you called "indian beads" as a kid. Those were sections of crinoid stems.

 

Yours is still in place though and complete instead of broken pieces like indian beads are. It's also not worn down. A nice find.

 

Here's a similar picture:

 

Echinodermata-Crinoid Stem   Greigsville   New York   USA   7189.JPG

 

Crinoids were related to starfish but stayed in one place instead of crawling around.

 

 

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I think it's a crinoid stem. Maybe you used to find something you called "indian beads" as a kid. Those were sections of crinoid stems.

Yours is still in place though and complete instead of broken pieces like indian beads are. It's also not worn down. A nice find.

Here's a similar picture:

Echinodermata-Crinoid Stem   Greigsville   New York   USA   7189.JPG

Crinoids were related to starfish but stayed in one place instead of crawling around.

 

I bet broadbill is feeling kinda silly right now.

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I think it's a crinoid stem. Maybe you used to find something you called "indian beads" as a kid. Those were sections of crinoid stems.

Yours is still in place though and complete instead of broken pieces like indian beads are. It's also not worn down. A nice find.

Here's a similar picture:

Echinodermata-Crinoid Stem   Greigsville   New York   USA   7189.JPG

Crinoids were related to starfish but stayed in one place instead of crawling around.

 

Yep, rebar.

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You're half an hour's drive from world-class paleontologists at the Academy of Natural Sciences or Penn or the Franklin Institute and you're asking the SOL tenured faculty of stoopid this question? Start with a call or an e-mail and then drive in to Philadelphia. Worst case: you'll have visited a cool museum or two. The WIKI force in SOL is strong, but for dating pre-Cambrian shale, I'd go someplace with drawers and display cases full of fossils and the people who know about them.

 

Oh yea, it's also not pre-cambrian.

 

If you're talking pre-cambrian you're talking really really old. There's not much like that.

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I bet broadbill is feeling kinda silly right now.

 

The WIKI force in SOL is strong, but for dating pre-Cambrian shale. . .

 

Bet hedged because not everyone is on the faculty.

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As someone who regularly has sex with someone who graduated from Penn and took a couple of archaeology classes, I feel qualified to answer, Mr Broadbill.

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