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SAT study guide...

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any of you younger folks that have used them recently... or parents with kids using them... is there any particular one i should be looking for? the most important thing to us is that it must not only show the math problems, but HOW to work the math problems.one with several practice tests in it wouldn't hurt either.

 

suggestions?

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on my kid's shelf I see "Math workout for the NEW SAT" by the Princeton Review.



 



flipping thru the pages it seems to be what you are looking for.



also a McGraw Hill with 9 Practice tests.


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FnM is right... multiple studies have shown, time and again, that the #1 thing you can do to raise SAT scores (including math, not just vocab and writing) is READ. Whatever it might be (newspapers, books, magazines), just READ.

 

Short of that, I've found the Princeton Review books to be the best for self-teaching...well-written, concise. The McGraw Hill books are not good for that, but they have LOTS of sample questions and tests and are a good resource for practice.

 

Also, there are multiple free on-line resources...The Khan Academy is one to get you started, but there are others. Scroll down to the SAT Test Prep section.

http://www.khanacademy.org/

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the classes are expensive but worth it...the best thiing a kid can do is learn how to take the test...there is some real strategy to taking the SAT..........

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Times have really changed... or maybe not. I just know that when I was taking the SATs in the 80's we pretty much just showed up on a Saturday morning and took them. No prep classes, no study guides. Just out the door with a wet head, a Pop Tart, a #2 pencil and pissed that the test was on a Saturday. And this is coming from the kid of a High School English teacher.

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While I will not dispute that the SAT study guides may help some kids raise their scores marginally, the SATs are really not something you can "study" for. By the time it is the time for you to take the test, you have either learned the stuff over the last 10 years or you haven't, and no amount of "cramming" is going to help you raise your score by any substantial amount.

 

Probably the best (perhaps only) benefit of any study guides or classes is that they have sample tests which allows one to become familiar with the format of the test so one would know what they are in for. When I took them, however, that was called the "PSAT".....;)

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Quote:

Originally Posted by HugeDinghy View Post

 

i'm sure many people, even then, took them more serious than you did.

 

agreed,

 

but like anything else we have turned the SAT into a money driven arms race.

 

 

 

The test is in theory to measure what the kid knows and how smart he is,

 

 

 

but it's become another area where the "edge" goes to the kid who's parents can afford the best test prep.

 

studying for the test subverts the value of the test in my opinion.

 

 

 

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While I will not dispute that the SAT study guides may help some kids raise their scores marginally, the SATs are really not something you can "study" for. By the time it is the time for you to take the test, you have either learned the stuff over the last 10 years or you haven't, and no amount of "cramming" is going to help you raise your score by any substantial amount.

Probably the best (perhaps only) benefit of any study guides or classes is that they have sample tests which allows one to become familiar with the format of the test so one would know what they are in for. When I took them, however, that was called the "PSAT".....;)

 

Why do you always go out of your way to be contrary?

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agreed,

but like anything else we have turned the SAT into a money driven arms race.

 

The test is in theory to measure what the kid knows and how smart he is,

 

but it's become another area where the "edge" goes to the kid who's parents can afford the best test prep.

studying for the test subverts the value of the test in my opinion.

 

 

Yeah, it makes comparing test results an apples and oranges thing. I think that is probably one of the reasons there has been talk about de-emphasizing standardized testing in college admissions. It's also one reason that I actually support some affirmative action in college admissions... not so much by skin color as by family income... of course, the two tend to go hand in hand on the whole.

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If the kid is looking to get a 1800 as long as they are pretty close to that with their PSAT's 50-60 on each part they will be best served to learn how to take the test (2100 + they will have to answer almost all of the problems correctly). Wrong answers count against you and time is limited. It is a worthwhile strategy to be able to quickly determine the problems that are going to take a little while and skip and come back. If they take 2-3 minutes on a problem they may miss three easy ones at the end because they ran out of time. This is what a course will do. The SAT can be gained with time and money(for the course). Short of that lots of practice tests are the best thing as many of the question types are repeated - particularly in math.

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Why do you always go out of your way to be contrary?

 

Not being contrary at all, just telling it like it is..............

 

The SAT was meant as a way for colleges to measure not only a person's knowledge of what they have learned over their elementary school and high school years, but also their aptitude for being able to learn (thus the name Scholastic Aptitude Test) the things they will be presented with in higher education.

 

Like I said, no amount of cramming for a month or even 6 months can EVER replace what one was supposed to learn and grasp over the course of 10 years or so of schooling. If ya don't know it by then, trying to learn it all in a few months is doomed to failure.

 

Tammy was insightful in asking for study guides that have sample tests, because for the most part, that is the only thing that might give a student an edge to know the format of the test.

 

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If the kid is looking to get a 1800 as long as they are pretty close to that with their PSAT's 50-60 on each part they will be best served to learn how to take the test (2100 + they will have to answer almost all of the problems correctly). Wrong answers count against you and time is limited. It is a worthwhile strategy to be able to quickly determine the problems that are going to take a little while and skip and come back. If they take 2-3 minutes on a problem they may miss three easy ones at the end because they ran out of time. This is what a course will do. The SAT can be gained with time and money(for the course). Short of that lots of practice tests are the best thing as many of the question types are repeated - particularly in math.

 

That is excellent advice. Standardized tests frequently put more difficult questions towards the front of the test.

 

Also, if they are still using optical reader answer sheets (maybe those have gone the way of the Dodo), kids have to be very careful to make sure that after skipping an answer they don't begin to fill in answers on the wrong line (i.e. answering question #22 in question #21's answer block).

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