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EPOXY PROBLEMS

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I use "pour-on"high gloss finish epoxy on my plugs the finish is great but i cant seem to stop the waves.We use a spinning epoxy dryer and a heat gun but still cant get that consistant finish.Any suggestions?


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Too much epoxy, you really need to pull the epoxy if you're using a brush, thin coats work best for me.

Epoxy is heavy too, if you're really looking for that deep shine, try two thin coats instead of one heavy one, too much epoxy can kill a lures action, make it swim sub-surface, etc.

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Too much epoxy, you really need to pull the epoxy if you're using a brush, thin coats work best for me.

Epoxy is heavy too, if you're really looking for that deep shine, try two thin coats instead of one heavy one, too much epoxy can kill a lures action, make it swim sub-surface, etc.

 

On the money

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I agree that the heat gun is probably contributing to the problem. Epoxy dries by a chemical reaction and while heat may speed it up a little it also thins it and the heat gun probably is not going to heat it evenly and, as previously, stated may even cause high and low spots. My cave is in the celler and cool even in the summer. I have never used extra heat and have never had a problem with uneven drying except when my wife shut off my spinner and I didn't know it ( we're still married but it was a close call for a while).

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On the money

 

Too much epoxy, you really need to pull the epoxy if you're using a brush, thin coats work best for me.

Epoxy is heavy too, if you're really looking for that deep shine, try two thin coats instead of one heavy one, too much epoxy can kill a lures action, make it swim sub-surface, etc.

 

+2

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and a heat gun

 

I'll lay money that the heat gun is the problem. Epoxy cures via chemical reaction and all heat will do is thin it and make it run.

Use the heat gun very quickly and sparingly, just enough to pop any bubbles in the finish, then just let it spin.

 

Also, don't lay the epoxy on too heavy. Multiple thinner coats cover much more thoroughly then one thick coat and aren't as easy to screw up (Learned that the hard way)

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Too much epoxy, you really need to pull the epoxy if you're using a brush, thin coats work best for me.

Epoxy is heavy too, if you're really looking for that deep shine, try two thin coats instead of one heavy one, too much epoxy can kill a lures action, make it swim sub-surface, etc.

 

Dead on... apply heavy and "pull" the epoxy from the thickest to the thinnest part of the plug.. thinning the layer as you go.. by starting thick and then thinning the amount on the plug, you are more likely to wet the entire plug and "see" the heigth of the layer of epoxy as well as feel it... rather than try and paint on a thin coat, which in alot of cases ends up with "holidays" where the epoxy was not applied..

 

a thin single coat is all that is needed....I have yet to see where there is any benifit to a second coat of epoxy...

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This is another what works best for you situation. Yes the heat gun is likely a cause. if you feel the need to heat, heat the epoxy before applying or heat an area not the plug.

 

The spinner can also be an issue depending on how it is set up. For the number of plugs I do at a time, I found the spinner more of a wasted space than anything else. I do one thick application and can flip/hang about 7-10 plugs in a sitting.

 

I brush on one thick coat, basically to the point of dripping. Rotate and spread the epoxy evenly and use a flame to eliminate all air bubbles. Then I take about a minute to flip the plug before hanging it. With one hanging I will move on to the next one and typically have to flip the first two or three times before I get to hang the second. Then I do the third the same way and by this time the first one only needs flipped once as I hang each additional plug.

 

With ETex light, a self leveling bar top epoxy, I use the caps to measure out the two parts and combined in a medicine cup. I will use a toothpick to mix the two parts for 2-3 min and depending on how cold the basement is I may do this under heat. With this amount I can get 3-4 plugs hanging at a time.

 

I do keep an eye on them for about an hour after the last plug is hung and flip as the epoxy runs. In my basement, after about an hour I get very little drips and a glass like finish.

 

Good luck

 

Jason

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We talked heat but we should also state that cold temperatures can cause problems also. . If your doing your work in a cold environment your epoxy will take longer to cure. Too cold and your epoxy won't (whats the word I'm looking for) react well when mixed. That might also be whats giving you the waves. Read the workable room temperatures posted on your epoxy bottles and make sure your room is at that heat level.

While the epoxy is curing some guys will have a light bulb close to the spinner. The bulb will keep the temperatures at a more constant level.

On a hair dryer it should be used to level your epoxy, and blow out air bubbles and that's it.

 

Sometimes we get in a rush to see the finished product and push the temperature levels to see the finished product.

Same goes with too high of air temps. The hotter it is the faster the epoxy cures. Too hot and set time shrinks real fast.

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