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Striper Behaviour and Low Pressure Weather Systems?

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Guys,



 



I'm thinking of hitting Sandy Hook this Saturday, and the weather looks mild, wet, and somewhat windy.  Does a system like this affect striper behavior and if so, how?  Like most other species of fish, I presume so, but if you have any particular insights, I'm all ears.  And, how do you guys adjust your fishing approach for these types of conditions? i.e. slow it down, go deeper. stay home :)



 



Inquiring googan wants to know :)


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Weather along with moon phases and it's effects on tides have an impact on all types of fish species. Nothing is written in stone and you must be out there to catch even if you feel your chances are slim. It should be noted that keeping a log on the conditions you fish in and what techniques you employ ,bait etc... will greatly aid you in the future. That being said many feel cold front's shut down the bite for some types of fish and increase the bite for others .

 

Fish pick up pressure changes far quicker than we do and a quick moving high pressure front can initially make fish sluggish until they adjust to the change. A high pressure front usually means bright blue sky's and sunny weather but doesn't guarantee good fishing. Low pressure system's often produce better fishing and many species have a habit of feeding heavily right before it moves in.

 

There are just to many variables to take into account regarding how certain fish species react compared to other fish species. For big blues and Bass, they will feed in rough turbulent conditions because those conditions make baitfish far more vulnerable, if you were discussing Fluke these conditions would not be preferred and it is often more productive shortly after a storm when waters begin to clear, but there are always exceptions and i have caught fluke in the middle of a storm.

 

Since you asked about Bass , i have found Bass to be highly unpredictable and always difficult to pattern compared to many other fish. When i fished for them

 

in the past i never stayed home regardless of weather conditions and moon phases.

 

They are one gamefish that can make you go back to the drawing board and make you second guess all your data from the logs you have been keeping. One thing that overrides any type of data is the abundance of bait , if there is an abundance of it, throw your info out the window because the fish usually don't adhere to their normal routines and can be aggressive at any time. Keep an eye out for school's of baitfish if fishing an unknown area and pay attention to bird's and how they are reacting.

 

If you know how to read the water you should have no trouble, if you get there at night and can't see much try to do the best you can until morning. At low tide get on higher ground with a good pair of polarized shades and observe the beach, you should instantly be able to determine what areas deserve your attention and which do not.

 

 

If your unsure of best techniques and bait's to go with, try to match the hatch at first, if your using artificial's try to determine what bait the Bass are feeding on and try to pick a plug that resembles it etc., anything and everything should be tried if your having difficulty, and give each one ample time to work.

 

Don't throw a certain plug only twice and then switch is what i mean, try different area's. When i fished Sandy hook i had a lot of success at the false rip down at the end of the island and right next to it North beach i believe, also had luck at the farthest point back toward that rocky area where the metal framed white sign was located. On the inside i fished Horseshoe cove and did well.

 

Lot's of great spot's on Sandy hook and i would not rule any out, i loved fishing the overnights until dark the following day. I don't know how much they closed due to Piping Plovers but you could limit out on fluke in an hour with no trouble. That was my favorite spot, but i fished Cape May and Avalon a lot,and farther north i often fished the Jetties in Deal and Elberon, then i tested the waters at Sea bright until i reached my real love Sandy Hook. Good luck

 

 

 

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I too had bought into the idea that fish are affected by changes in barometric pressure. I always wondered just how they sensed the changes since water is so much denser than air. Your post pushed me into doing some research into the subject.

 

I found an interesting article by David A Ross Phd, a scientist emeritus at Woods Hole Oceonagraphic Institute, he is the author of The Fisherman's Ocean, ( How marine science can help you find and catch more fish)

 

 

The Pressure Myth

by Dr. David A. Ross

 

Does a changing barometer truly affect our fishing success? Let science answer that question.

FISHERMEN SOMETIMES have ideas or opinions about the marine environment that do not stand up to scientific scrutiny. For example, many anglers believe that changes in barometric pressure strongly influence fish behavior—most notably their willingness to cooperate with anglers. Some have even written that fish can detect a change in barometric pressure before it occurs. An interesting notion, perhaps, though in almost all instances it is incorrect.

 

A rise or fall in barometric pressure, such as with an approaching cold front, usually means a shift in the weather pattern. And it is the change in the weather, not any fluctuation in barometric pressure, that affects both the fish and the fishing. In fact, most saltwater species probably aren’t even aware of barometric variations.

 

Pressure, whether in the air or in the ocean, is expressed by scientists as units of “atmosphere.” One atmosphere is defined as the pressure caused by the weight of all the overlying air at sea level—or 14.7 pounds per square inch (psi). Atmospheric pressure is often called barometric pressure because it can be measured by the height of the mercury column in a barometer. Changes in barometric pressure, therefore, indicate capricious weather. In general, low-pressure systems bring unstable conditions, often with precipitation and clouds. A rising barometer means high-pressure is approaching, the harbinger of stable and clear skies.

 

How much do fish respond to these day-to-day fluctuations? Consider that a normal value for barometric pressure is about 30 inches. Strong high pressure is about 30.70 inches. A powerful low, such as during a hurricane, can reach down to 28 inches or less. The difference between these two extremes (2.7 inches of barometric pressure) is equal to about .09 atmospheres. The barometric pressure difference from a simple passing cold front is only about .06 atmospheres.

 

The rate of a falling barometer also tells us how fast a low-pressure storm is approaching. A slow-moving storm would have a dip of about .02 to .03 inches of barometric pressure per hour; a fast-moving storm will drop the barometer about 0.05 to 0.06 inches per hour.

 

Simply stated, barometric pressure does not change quickly enough to magically turn the bite on or off. It certainly is one of the ingredients in the overall weather process, but temperature, cloud cover, wind direction and speed, and humidity can also affect fishing conditions. More importantly, the rate and amount of change in barometric pressure is insignificant compared to what’s going on below the surface.

 

Beneath The Squeeze

Pressure in the ocean, called hydrostatic pressure, increases with depth due to the weight of the overlying water. Water is almost 800 times denser than air; thus, hydrostatic pressure increases much more rapidly than atmospheric pressure. If you swim or dive just a few feet below the water’s surface, you feel this rapid increase in pressure.

 

At a depth of just 32.8 feet in the ocean, the hydrostatic pressure is equal to the pressure from the entire weight of the earth’s atmosphere as measured in pounds per square inch. In other words, at 32.8 feet, the total pressure, due to the weight of both the atmosphere and the water, is two atmospheres. At 65.6 feet it’s 3 atmospheres, and so forth.

 

Fish can tolerate hydrostatic pressure because they have a swim bladder containing a volume of gas, which they adjust to equal their environment. This enables most fish to comfortably make small and quick up or down movements in the water column.

 

In the ocean, four main factors can change the hydrostatic pressure in the fish’s world. First, a fish naturally changes pressure around itself by making movements associated with feeding, swimming about, avoiding predators or trying to loose a hook. A small move can result in a relatively large pressure variation. For example, going up or down just 3.28 feet will decrease or increase the pressure on a fish by 1/10 of an atmosphere. One tenth of an atmosphere exceeds any reasonable change that might occur due to a fluctuation in barometric pressure. Equally important, when barometric pressure rises or falls, it can take more than a day to equal the change in hydrostatic pressure that a fish experiences in seconds during its normal up or down movements.

 

Second, tides can alter hydrostatic pressure. Assuming the fish stays in the same position, even a small three-foot rise in tide will increase the hydrostatic pressure by about 0.09 atmospheres. A low tide would decrease the hydrostatic pressure by a similar amount. Thus, within about a six-hour period from high to low tide, a fish would experience a fall of about .18 atmospheres of pressure. This is about twice what could be expected from the barometric pressure going through a major drop during a hurricane.

 

Third, waves make rapid and continuous changes in hydrostatic pressure. Two-foot waves, for example, will produce a change in pressure of about .06 atmospheres. This rapid change correlates to the period of the waves—about four to six seconds. Higher pressure comes when the crest passes; lower pressure occurs under the trough. When a storm approaches a coastal area, the waves, and the increase in hydrostatic pressure, will be considerably higher than during calm-weather periods.

 

The weight of the air itself is the fourth influence on hydrostatic pressure, but its effect is quite gradual. Barometric pressure associated with a major storm will dip (depending on the system’s rate of speed) by only .002 to .02 atmospheres per hour. This gives fish considerable time to make any necessary adjustments. When compared to the effects of the tide, waves, and normal movements of the fish in the water column, changes in hydrostatic pressure caused by barometric-pressure are trivial for saltwater fish. Even a dramatic change in the barometer will be lost to the everyday pressure changes experienced by fish under normal oceanographic conditions.

 

It’s a happy notion that one could simply consult the mercury column each morning to know whether it’s a better day for work or fishing, but it’s unlikely that barometric pressure alone can trigger the sudden bite that angling’s common wisdom often asserts.

 

 

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Thanks for the very insightful reply.  I'm really enjoying the process of learning to read a beach,  much like I've learned to read a trout stream.  As you mentioned, the unpredictability is very much part of the challenge and thus, the fun :)



 



Thanks


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I too had bought into the idea that fish are affected by changes in barometric pressure. I always wondered just how they sensed the changes since water is so much denser than air. Your post pushed me into doing some research into the subject.

I found an interesting article by David A Ross Phd, a scientist emeritus at Woods Hole Oceonagraphic Institute, he is the author of The Fisherman's Ocean, ( How marine science can help you find and catch more fish)

The Pressure Myth

by Dr. David A. Ross

Does a changing barometer truly affect our fishing success? Let science answer that question.

FISHERMEN SOMETIMES have ideas or opinions about the marine environment that do not stand up to scientific scrutiny. For example, many anglers believe that changes in barometric pressure strongly influence fish behavior—most notably their willingness to cooperate with anglers. Some have even written that fish can detect a change in barometric pressure before it occurs. An interesting notion, perhaps, though in almost all instances it is incorrect.

A rise or fall in barometric pressure, such as with an approaching cold front, usually means a shift in the weather pattern. And it is the change in the weather, not any fluctuation in barometric pressure, that affects both the fish and the fishing. In fact, most saltwater species probably aren’t even aware of barometric variations.

Pressure, whether in the air or in the ocean, is expressed by scientists as units of “atmosphere.” One atmosphere is defined as the pressure caused by the weight of all the overlying air at sea level—or 14.7 pounds per square inch (psi). Atmospheric pressure is often called barometric pressure because it can be measured by the height of the mercury column in a barometer. Changes in barometric pressure, therefore, indicate capricious weather. In general, low-pressure systems bring unstable conditions, often with precipitation and clouds. A rising barometer means high-pressure is approaching, the harbinger of stable and clear skies.

How much do fish respond to these day-to-day fluctuations? Consider that a normal value for barometric pressure is about 30 inches. Strong high pressure is about 30.70 inches. A powerful low, such as during a hurricane, can reach down to 28 inches or less. The difference between these two extremes (2.7 inches of barometric pressure) is equal to about .09 atmospheres. The barometric pressure difference from a simple passing cold front is only about .06 atmospheres.

The rate of a falling barometer also tells us how fast a low-pressure storm is approaching. A slow-moving storm would have a dip of about .02 to .03 inches of barometric pressure per hour; a fast-moving storm will drop the barometer about 0.05 to 0.06 inches per hour.

Simply stated, barometric pressure does not change quickly enough to magically turn the bite on or off. It certainly is one of the ingredients in the overall weather process, but temperature, cloud cover, wind direction and speed, and humidity can also affect fishing conditions. More importantly, the rate and amount of change in barometric pressure is insignificant compared to what’s going on below the surface.

Beneath The Squeeze

Pressure in the ocean, called hydrostatic pressure, increases with depth due to the weight of the overlying water. Water is almost 800 times denser than air; thus, hydrostatic pressure increases much more rapidly than atmospheric pressure. If you swim or dive just a few feet below the water’s surface, you feel this rapid increase in pressure.

At a depth of just 32.8 feet in the ocean, the hydrostatic pressure is equal to the pressure from the entire weight of the earth’s atmosphere as measured in pounds per square inch. In other words, at 32.8 feet, the total pressure, due to the weight of both the atmosphere and the water, is two atmospheres. At 65.6 feet it’s 3 atmospheres, and so forth.

Fish can tolerate hydrostatic pressure because they have a swim bladder containing a volume of gas, which they adjust to equal their environment. This enables most fish to comfortably make small and quick up or down movements in the water column.

In the ocean, four main factors can change the hydrostatic pressure in the fish’s world. First, a fish naturally changes pressure around itself by making movements associated with feeding, swimming about, avoiding predators or trying to loose a hook. A small move can result in a relatively large pressure variation. For example, going up or down just 3.28 feet will decrease or increase the pressure on a fish by 1/10 of an atmosphere. One tenth of an atmosphere exceeds any reasonable change that might occur due to a fluctuation in barometric pressure. Equally important, when barometric pressure rises or falls, it can take more than a day to equal the change in hydrostatic pressure that a fish experiences in seconds during its normal up or down movements.

Second, tides can alter hydrostatic pressure. Assuming the fish stays in the same position, even a small three-foot rise in tide will increase the hydrostatic pressure by about 0.09 atmospheres. A low tide would decrease the hydrostatic pressure by a similar amount. Thus, within about a six-hour period from high to low tide, a fish would experience a fall of about .18 atmospheres of pressure. This is about twice what could be expected from the barometric pressure going through a major drop during a hurricane.

Third, waves make rapid and continuous changes in hydrostatic pressure. Two-foot waves, for example, will produce a change in pressure of about .06 atmospheres. This rapid change correlates to the period of the waves—about four to six seconds. Higher pressure comes when the crest passes; lower pressure occurs under the trough. When a storm approaches a coastal area, the waves, and the increase in hydrostatic pressure, will be considerably higher than during calm-weather periods.

The weight of the air itself is the fourth influence on hydrostatic pressure, but its effect is quite gradual. Barometric pressure associated with a major storm will dip (depending on the system’s rate of speed) by only .002 to .02 atmospheres per hour. This gives fish considerable time to make any necessary adjustments. When compared to the effects of the tide, waves, and normal movements of the fish in the water column, changes in hydrostatic pressure caused by barometric-pressure are trivial for saltwater fish. Even a dramatic change in the barometer will be lost to the everyday pressure changes experienced by fish under normal oceanographic conditions.

It’s a happy notion that one could simply consult the mercury column each morning to know whether it’s a better day for work or fishing, but it’s unlikely that barometric pressure alone can trigger the sudden bite that angling’s common wisdom often asserts.

 

 

 

Thanks for posting and here is my take on what Mr.Ross believes .As i said in my experience, and that's exactly what it is , i have found that fish have been far more aggressive right before certain types of fronts, than they are after or during , especially with certain fish species. .

 

I have Mr .Ross's book actually . He is certainly entitled to his opinion and he thinks differently than i do. There is just to many instances in his book that have not turned out to be the case in my experience. I much more prefer the book written in 74, by Thorn Bacon which contradicts much of what Mr.Ross claims. And my personal experiences are much more close to Mr.Thorns book than Mr.Ross's.

 

His constant scientific analysis regarding how fish are supposed to feel and react is annoying, many mystery's don't add up on paper but they still exist. Next time you question Barometric pressure and if it effects fish , observe fish in an aquarium over a long period of time and how different they react when different front's are coming and going etc..., i have a few and they most certainly do react differently and it's not caused by waves, wind and tides.

 

Mr.Ross knows that his opinion is almost the opposite and far different than what most experts have considered to be the case for decades. No book should be considered gospel and you should base your beliefs on what you have personally witnessed while fishing, and that's exactly what i relayed in my post, that's all you can do is relay what you have had happen and you hope it benefits your fellow angler .

 

This forum is here to listen to differing opinions and Mr.Ross has his and it's respected, but i tend to believe what i have actually witnessed myself and it's far from what Mr.Ross thinks is the case. It's certainly not the first time i have strongly disagreed with an author..

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Thanks for posting and here is my take on what Mr.Ross believes .As i said in my experience, and that's exactly what it is , i have found that fish have been far more aggressive right before certain types of fronts, than they are after or during , especially with certain fish species. .

I have Mr .Ross's book actually . He is certainly entitled to his opinion and he thinks differently than i do. There is just to many instances in his book that have not turned out to be the case in my experience. I much more prefer the book written in 74, by Thorn Bacon which contradicts much of what Mr.Ross claims. And my personal experiences are much more close to Mr.Thorns book than Mr.Ross's.

His constant scientific analysis regarding how fish are supposed to feel and react is annoying, many mystery's don't add up on paper but they still exist. Next time you question Barometric pressure and if it effects fish , observe fish in an aquarium over a long period of time and how different they react when different front's are coming and going etc..., i have a few and they most certainly do react differently and it's not caused by waves, wind and tides.

Mr.Ross knows that his opinion is almost the opposite and far different than what most experts have considered to be the case for decades. No book should be considered gospel and you should base your beliefs on what you have personally witnessed while fishing, and that's exactly what i relayed in my post, that's all you can do is relay what you have had happen and you hope it benefits your fellow angler .

This forum is here to listen to differing opinions and Mr.Ross has his and it's respected, but i tend to believe what i have actually witnessed myself and it's far from what Mr.Ross thinks is the case. It's certainly not the first time i have strongly disagreed with an author..

 

 

 

 

IMO for those observations to be valid a log of both the barometric pressure of the air and the pressure in the tank would be necessary.

 

 

Who might these experts be?

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Important in what way?  Are you saying you found that stripers feed more actively during a pressure change, rather than at steady pressures?

 



Quote:

Originally Posted by the soldier View Post

In my opinion the CHANGE in barometric pressure is more important then fishing in the middle of a storm.



 


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IMO for those observations to be valid a log of both the barometric pressure of the air and the pressure in the tank would be necessary.

Who might these experts be? [/quote]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here's a few,

 

Galveston Texas Coast Guard,Admiral W.J.Smith, Commandant U.S Coast Guard, Captain V.J Mitchell Chief of Boating Education, A.J Rohlfs, Marine Supervisor, National Weather Service Marine Center,New Orlean's, Davis Benton Chief Meteorologist National Weather Service Galveston, Norman Prosser, Chief principal assistant Meteorologist,Denver Colo, Admiral R.A Keating U.S Navy chief Navigator, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston Texas.

 

If you go back and read most books on this subject even from the early 50's you will find many of them with views that are quite opposite of the views of Mr. Ross. But like i said Mr.Ross is entitled to his opinions and i respect them. The best thing to do is fish and take note of what works and what doesn't when your in those conditions. It was an interesting topic and thread, thanks for contributing:

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Important in what way?  Are you saying you found that stripers feed more actively during a pressure change, rather than at steady pressures?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While waiting for the Soldier, Stripers will feed during the day, during the night,at anytime they are unpredictable and voracious.This is serious, get those lines in the water!!!

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Good luck on Saturday!

 

My advice for fishing saltwater during the first week of March is not related to the Barometer.

(Although, later on in the season, I believe a FALLING Barometer can "turn on" a bite.)

 

Significant factors for early Spring in any year, revolve around water temperature.

The predators "hunt" for bait, in order to live.

But there is precious little bait in the water.

Herring and White Perch?

 

Look at those schoolies you catch. Their nose is red!

This is from rooting around on the bottom, looking for sea worms and clam spat.

 

If you use bait, it's either clams or worms.

If you go artificial, think DEEP....bucktails and sassy shads.

Slow down your presentation.

 

Think about the back of a bay, with the water out, and the sun warming the mud.

As the water comes in, it is warmed by the hot mud.

If dead high coincides with sunset, I'll see you about 3 PM.

 

AMMO

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Well, looks like rain is going to stop around noon and the sun is going to peak thru around 3:00 pm for a temp high of 56 degrees, winds at 14 mph, and high tide at 4:07.



 



Rising pressure and tides, back and front open - could be an interesting day of varied conditions to plug, test my new equipment, bring a lunch and enjoy the day. smile.gif



 



Thanks for the advice.. 



 



Cheers gentlemen and have a great weekend smile.gif

 



Quote:

Originally Posted by AMMO View Post

Good luck on Saturday!

My advice for fishing saltwater during the first week of March is not related to the Barometer.

(Although, later on in the season, I believe a FALLING Barometer can "turn on" a bite.)

Significant factors for early Spring in any year, revolve around water temperature.

The predators "hunt" for bait, in order to live.

But there is precious little bait in the water.

Herring and White Perch?

Look at those schoolies you catch. Their nose is red!

This is from rooting around on the bottom, looking for sea worms and clam spat.

If you use bait, it's either clams or worms.

If you go artificial, think DEEP....bucktails and sassy shads.

Slow down your presentation.

Think about the back of a bay, with the water out, and the sun warming the mud.

As the water comes in, it is warmed by the hot mud.

If dead high coincides with sunset, I'll see you about 3 PM.

AMMO



 


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i believe an incoming low pressure system can promote a bite. i've also had some of my best nights in the snot- during a low pressure system.

 

and that snot is what makes it so much more fun...:)

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I fish the spring spawn in the delaware river and kept a log to try find a pattern of what worked best for keeper size stripers. tide,bait, place, time of day, 5 years no pattern. went to weather underground and checked the weather history for those days. every one of those days when i had success had an air pressure reading of under 30'', now the worst the weather the more i'm amped up to fish, especially warm wet days.

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