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Huge Aerator Aims to Combat Dead Fish Stink in Queens

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article from nbcny;

 

 

"Residents of Howard Beach have long complained about the putrid stink of dead fish that suffocates their neighborhood each summer as schools of bluefish and striped bass die en masse in the stagnant waters of Shellbank Basin.

 

This summer, they may finally have some relief.

 

The city’s Department of Environmental Protection finished work on a $3.5 million machine designed to prevent the mass die-offs by pumping compressed air through nearly 4,000 feet of tubing across the basin floor, operating more or less like a giant aerator in a fish tank, according to The New York Times.

 

The compressor is an improved incarnation of a smaller version that failed to combat the smell in 2008, when more than 10,000 fish carcasses clogged the basin. Though 2008 proved extreme in terms of fish carnage, scientists say the layout of Shellbank Basin is naturally deadly to fish because of a phenomenon called temperature stratification, reports the Times.

 

The mouth of the waterway is significantly shallower than its end, which prevents the basin's waters from mixing properly.

 

Fish that swim down from Jamaica Bay in search of food end up suffocating in the stagnant inlet waters, contributing to a stench that forces waterfront restaurant owners to shut down their patios in summer and sends residents fleeing to relatives’ or friends’ pools elsewhere.

 

The project was paid for entirely by a Department of Environmental Protection fund supported by the money New Yorkers pay to use city sewer and water utilities, reports the Times.

 

State Senator Joseph Addabbo Jr., a Democrat who represents Howard Beach, says it’s about time the city stem the stench.

 

“People in Howard Beach pay a lot in taxes. It’s not a lot to ask for to have something like this fixed,” he told the Times. “Living close to water doesn’t necessarily mean that it should be the equivalent of living next to the Fulton Fish Market in its heyday.”

 

 

 

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Oooohhh boy this should open a can of worms! same problem happens all along the south shore canals of nassau and suffolk county. the worst being babylon that i know off, two years ago it was merrick. but it happens often in babylon/islip. I believe they blame it on "brown tide". does it happen on the north shore?

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if they oxygenate that water back there, will it help or hurt the ecosystem? i wont pretend to know, anyone?

 

Good question, but I'm not sure the answer is so black or white. I would assume that more oxygen introduced into the system will ultimately help in the short term. Aerobic respiration, as opposed to anaerobic (without oxygen), produces less toxic and stinking by-products. More dissolved oxygen available for microbe and plankton populations should produce more food for baitfish and fry. The animal populations may go through a boom and bust cycle before stabilizing, though. I haven't researched this it all, but only relying on a 30 year old college degree in Fisheries Biology. Would be curious to see how this has worked in other installations.

 

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Isn't there a direct correlation in the water's temperature and its ability to hold/contain dissolved oxygen, so the dissolved oxygen will do nothing about the temperature stratification that exist, So won't the water in the backbay once its heats up mid summer basically not be able to hold dissolved O2.

 

So again come the end of August we will still have hot stinky water with a slightly higher dissolved oxygen content???

 

Sounds like our Tax dollars hard at work once again :shock:

 

 

 

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They have been doing this for some time in that canal.I used to keep my boat in that canal and it did help.the fish kills were mostly bunker and alot of them.The mouth of the canal needs to be dredged at low water its like 8' and in the back its 40'.

 

I havn't been back there for about 7 or 8 years now I keep my boat in broad channel.Jamica Bay needs a lot of help.:(

 

Mike.

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Aeration also raises pH.

 

The pH of natural seawater is about 8.3.

 

However, if you artificially increase the pH in an area where it's lower (more acidic) instead of letting nature take its course well, I don't what that will do to the ecosystem.

 

 

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article from nbcny;

"Residents of Howard Beach have long complained about the putrid stink of dead fish that suffocates their neighborhood each summer as schools of bluefish and striped bass die en masse in the stagnant waters of Shellbank Basin.

This summer, they may finally have some relief.

The city’s Department of Environmental Protection finished work on a $3.5 million machine designed to prevent the mass die-offs by pumping compressed air through nearly 4,000 feet of tubing across the basin floor, operating more or less like a giant aerator in a fish tank, according to The New York Times.

The compressor is an improved incarnation of a smaller version that failed to combat the smell in 2008, when more than 10,000 fish carcasses clogged the basin. Though 2008 proved extreme in terms of fish carnage, scientists say the layout of Shellbank Basin is naturally deadly to fish because of a phenomenon called temperature stratification, reports the Times.

The mouth of the waterway is significantly shallower than its end, which prevents the basin's waters from mixing properly.

Fish that swim down from Jamaica Bay in search of food end up suffocating in the stagnant inlet waters, contributing to a stench that forces waterfront restaurant owners to shut down their patios in summer and sends residents fleeing to relatives’ or friends’ pools elsewhere.

The project was paid for entirely by a Department of Environmental Protection fund supported by the money New Yorkers pay to use city sewer and water utilities, reports the Times.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo Jr., a Democrat who represents Howard Beach, says it’s about time the city stem the stench.

“People in Howard Beach pay a lot in taxes. It’s not a lot to ask for to have something like this fixed,” he told the Times. “Living close to water doesn’t necessarily mean that it should be the equivalent of living next to the Fulton Fish Market in its heyday.”

 

A true fisherman loves that stank. Yummy. Trimethylaminuria forever.

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I'm not sure of it's effect in this case, but in Fla. they use fountains and aerators in thousands of lakes and pounds and the fish thrive. I'd be great it works and helps the ecosystem back there.

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Oooohhh boy this should open a can of worms! same problem happens all along the south shore canals of nassau and suffolk county. the worst being babylon that i know off, two years ago it was merrick. but it happens often in babylon/islip. I believe they blame it on "brown tide". does it happen on the north shore?

 

We've had massive bunker kills/die offs in Huntington Harbor and it's adjacent harbors but not in a while. The last big one took place right at the launching ramp

in Huntington Harbor and the town brought in a bulldozer to pick them all up for hauling. You will see a dead bluefish or bass now and then but they most likely

died from natural causes or being dumped over by a foolish fishing party. Not what we're talking about here.

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