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BaconOntheSea

stockingfoot or bootfoot

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Hey guys



I have a pair of pro-line boot foot breathable waders but there getting old and i wanted to replace them.  i planned on getting a pair of Simms headwaters stocking foot.  anyone have a problem standing in the surf all day with stocking foots? i know they provide more stability but i also know they can fill up with sand.  I will mainly be using them on the sand with some use on jetties any help/advise would be great thanks


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I have simms blackfoot w/ neoprene wading boots. I got them to fish salt flats for reds/specks in Texas, which they are perfect for. I wear them up here on the beach. They are okay, but sand/gravel does get in the boot and weigh me down. I would probably go with boot foot, or spend more money and get a pair with gravel guards.

JSM

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I went with breathable stocking foot waders.  Once I hook the cuff of the waders to the front lace of my wading boots very little sand gets into the boot.  I will fish all day without any problems. 



 



 


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For the sand boot foot breathable waders.  Sand is not a issue and they dry out a lot quicker especially if you fish everyday.  Stocking foot you need wader shoes.

 

Yep, that about sums it up for me as well. If you're going to be predominantly in the sand, I think bootfoots provide you with a lower probability that you'll spend valuable fishing time monkeying around with your waders.

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I prefer the boot foot wader as I am often on the go. I want to be able to take them on and off quickly and not be botherd with haviing to lace and tie wading shoes especially during inclimate weather.

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Boot foot for me as well. The shoe to sock in a sandy environment will evently wear the sock thin with the abrasive action of sand between sock and booot.

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I use Hodgman Bootfoot breathables. I prefer the boot foot because it honestly is one less thing in the back of my truck. I never have to worry about forgetting a gravel guard, a boot, etc. I also buy one size bigger so during the winter months I can layer and not worry about an overly tight fit throughout the boot and actual wader. I also own a pair of neoprene waders for when it is beyond cold which are also bootfoot.


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I've used bootfoot waders for way too many years,,, 3 years ago I started with stockingfoot and boots and will never go back.. the fit is much better than any boot/wader combo,,hands down.. I primarily fish open beaches and whenever I can walk onto sand bars I do and even when I can't I'm still always in the wash.. sand guards work minimally. Its not like I'm carrying an extra few pounds .. ounces maybe.The trick is simple... properly lace your shoes and tie a lace knot you can depend on and sand intrusion will be minimal. When I get home I hose off my neoprene footboot and rinse my boots out... in season my shoe boot will rarely dry out..but who cares.. I leave the shoe and laces opened wide providing quick and simple neoprene footboot insertion... The fact is I have much greater foot/ankle stabilization than any bootfoot one piece will ever provide.

 

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I have been fishing with using boot foot waders from Snowbee.  They are breathable and very light weight.  They are extremely easy to put on and take off.  The negative side of the Snowbee's is that they don't make the wader I have been using anymore.  My brother fishes using stocking foot waders with the shoes, he has to put on and hook to the wader.  It takes me about a minute to put them on and take off and it takes my brother much more time than that to take off and put on.


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I think it's a matter of what you would personally prefer.

 

I've been using the Snowbee's bootfoot for about 4 years now and during the fall run they started leaking on me.

I went out and purchased Simms stockingfoot and used those with Orvis and Simms boots and find them much lighter, especially when walking the sand a lot. I actually like them better than the bootfoot's I had. Sand getting into them wasn't really an issue. Very minor amount of sand in the boot after several hours in the water.

 

Don't think I'll be going back to boot foot in the future.

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Bootfoot for the sand and stockfoot for jetties.  I dislike getting sand in my stockfoot waders when walking the beaches.  For jetties, I prefer stockfoot with korkers.  The boots fit much more snug to your feet when using stockfooting thus providing you better traction/stability when jetty hopping.  I find bootfoot on jetties to feel somewhat clumsy feeling, but maybe that's just because I own cheap waderssmile.gif



 



You can also get gravel guards with stockfooting, but it doesn't mean that it will prevent any sand in getting in at all.  



 



 


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ORVIS Breathable boot foot...Lifetime Warentee...

Super light weight. Boots are snug fitting ond spongy feeling, but very durable.

 

Putting on wet sandy boots in the dark sucks.

Sand get's in the boots no matter what I do. It fills up under the arches of your feet causing them to feel like they are cramping up after a few long days of fishing.

 

If you can, and if you have the choice, these are the best I have ever used, or seen.

 

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