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NASA astronomers have clocked the fastest wind ever discovered blowing off the stellar-mass black hole, IGR J17091-3624.

 

The wind was discovered by NASA Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra). Chandra has been orbiting the Earth since it was deployed by the Space Shuttle Columbia on July 23, 1999. The Observatory is designed to observe X-rays from high energy regions of the universe.

 

The wind is generated by a gas disk that surrounds the black hole. The 20 million MPH wind is equivalent to about 3 percent of the speed of light. Unlike winds from hurricanes, the wind coming off the disk blows in many different directions.

 

Astronomers were surprised to see such a high wind speed coming from a stellar-mass black hole. Ordinarily, such high wind speeds are connected with the much larger "super-massive" black holes.

 

The gravitational pull of a black hole, which is formed when the center of a large star collapses, is so strong, even light can not get out. The astronomers learned that the winds from the black hole may be pushing more material into space than the black hole is capturing.

 

Three different sizes of black holes exist. The smallest black holes are believed to be as small as one atom, and to have formed when the universe began.

 

Stellar-black holes have a mass that can be up to 20 times the mass of the sun. These black holes are formed by collapsing stars.

 

The largest black holes, supermassive-black holes, have a mass that is equal to about 4 million suns. Scientists have proof that each large galaxy has a supermassive-black hole at its center. Scientists believe these black holes formed at the same time as the galaxy they are in.

 

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Here's a recent video released by NASA of 'solar tornadoes'...related articles state that the vortexs are rotating at speeds of 300,000 mph and are roughly the size of earth:

 

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NASA astronomers have clocked the fastest wind ever discovered blowing off the stellar-mass black hole, IGR J17091-3624.

The wind was discovered by NASA Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra). Chandra has been orbiting the Earth since it was deployed by the Space Shuttle Columbia on July 23, 1999. The Observatory is designed to observe X-rays from high energy regions of the universe.

The wind is generated by a gas disk that surrounds the black hole. The 20 million MPH wind is equivalent to about 3 percent of the speed of light. Unlike winds from hurricanes, the wind coming off the disk blows in many different directions.

Astronomers were surprised to see such a high wind speed coming from a stellar-mass black hole. Ordinarily, such high wind speeds are connected with the much larger "super-massive" black holes.

The gravitational pull of a black hole, which is formed when the center of a large star collapses, is so strong, even light can not get out. The astronomers learned that the winds from the black hole may be pushing more material into space than the black hole is capturing.

Three different sizes of black holes exist. The smallest black holes are believed to be as small as one atom, and to have formed when the universe began.

Stellar-black holes have a mass that can be up to 20 times the mass of the sun. These black holes are formed by collapsing stars.

The largest black holes, supermassive-black holes, have a mass that is equal to about 4 million suns. Scientists have proof that each large galaxy has a supermassive-black hole at its center. Scientists believe these black holes formed at the same time as the galaxy they are in.

 

Dude....you've been toking it up too much lately with these posts.

Let's rendez-vous in Montreal and beat some hookers.

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Dude....you've been toking it up too much lately with these posts.

Let's rendez-vous in Montreal and beat some hookers.

 

It's the cows. They break even the strongest of wills. Damn them and their bovine perspiration !

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NASA astronomers have clocked the fastest wind ever discovered blowing off the stellar-mass black hole, IGR J17091-3624.

The wind was discovered by NASA Astronomers using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (Chandra). Chandra has been orbiting the Earth since it was deployed by the Space Shuttle Columbia on July 23, 1999. The Observatory is designed to observe X-rays from high energy regions of the universe.

The wind is generated by a gas disk that surrounds the black hole. The 20 million MPH wind is equivalent to about 3 percent of the speed of light. Unlike winds from hurricanes, the wind coming off the disk blows in many different directions.

Astronomers were surprised to see such a high wind speed coming from a stellar-mass black hole. Ordinarily, such high wind speeds are connected with the much larger "super-massive" black holes.

The gravitational pull of a black hole, which is formed when the center of a large star collapses, is so strong, even light can not get out. The astronomers learned that the winds from the black hole may be pushing more material into space than the black hole is capturing.

Three different sizes of black holes exist. The smallest black holes are believed to be as small as one atom, and to have formed when the universe began.

Stellar-black holes have a mass that can be up to 20 times the mass of the sun. These black holes are formed by collapsing stars.

The largest black holes, supermassive-black holes, have a mass that is equal to about 4 million suns. Scientists have proof that each large galaxy has a supermassive-black hole at its center. Scientists believe these black holes formed at the same time as the galaxy they are in.

 

I'm getting a headache trying to comprehend this.

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