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jfisher76

Reel and Lines? 9' - 9wt BVK

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After all the thoughtful discussion in my other thread I've decided to go ahead and order the Temple Fork BVK 9' 9wt.

Now the reel and lines!

 

I am looking for general recommendations on reel size & line type, ie floating/intermediate, shooting head. Do you guys carry various spools for the same reels loaded with different line and swap them out as conditions dictate? Again I will be fishing (from shore primarily) the bays/coves in the spring and light surf ocean beaches.

 

While I've started to do some research online, as before, my knowledge is minimal and feel a bit confused by the variety of line options (ie 300 grain vs. 450, shooting, double tapered, sinking. :shock:

 

If you have any particular bands you'd like to recommend please let me know as well. I may try to travel to test cast some different set ups. I've gotten recommendations for Nautilus reels and Lansom.

Any input would be appreciated.

 

Thank you

Joel

 

 

Oh, and what are your thoughts on overlining? I think it was mentioned in the past thread as a good learning tool and Rich Murphy in his book recommends it as well for a beginner. Thanks

 

 

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.

While I've started to do some research online, as before, my knowledge is minimal and feel a bit confused by the variety of line options (ie 300 grain vs. 450, shooting, double tapered, sinking. :shock:

 

Oh, and what are your thoughts on overlining?

 

Your way is very common but still wrong way which becomes more expensive too. It is the fly line which determines your fishing combo performance. Also its the line weight which mostly define how hard it is for you to fish the combo.

 

If you cast a 450gr shooting head (which corresponds about WF11.5 line weight) with worst 9wt labeled rod you find and you use mono shooting line you achieve better distance casting performance than with the best 9wt rod you can find which with you cast only 300gr head line (which corresponds about WF9 line).

 

So you should find out what line weight you need and then find a rod which you like to use. First it is the fly size which determines line weight and second it is wind conditions. Again there is only one rule to follow. Better performance with higher line weight and remember it needs more effort to cast.

 

BVK is great improvement because of its light weight and 9wt is good line weight as first because it gives good performance and is not too heavy to fish. If you want to save money on spare spools and fly lines start using shooting heads. Modern rods have large guides so loop to loop connection runs free although it makes some noise. There are better coated shooting lines than most WF lines have and mono SL are very cheap and gives extra 10ft distance..

 

Esa

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Esa,

 

Pretty much well agree with you 100%. I am hoping that jF76's BVK is indeed well rated for a std long belly Wf no 9wt line. I do not know this rod to suggest it is or not. Again it is the old problem that some makers have in poorly rating their rods. According to what I read on SOL TFO seem to have a problem in this area with some of their salt water rods.

 

Ok jF lets assume that your BVK 9wt is ok with a std wf 9 line. Then for most shore fishing situations you will find the following lines useful. Intermediate, Floater. D3 and D7. When you get your casting sorted you may want to try a T14. But you only need a T14 in very fast and deep water . The Intermediate will probably be the most useful line you will own.

 

Shooting head or long belly WF lines? Well for me Long belly WF line wins hands down but they cost more money and you will need to carry a spare spool or two with you.

The other issue with ready made shooting heads is that the head lengths are too short at 30 feet and you may find that a 9wt 30 foot shooting head will not load your rod well. It is common to go one or even two sizes up for 30 foot std heads. SH don't casts as well for me as a long belly wf line but others will doubtless dissagree.

SH are lower in cost and it is easier and lighter to cary a wallet with two or three spare heads in.

 

Normally I only take one spare spool with me. I mostly know in advance what lines I will need. On the flats of Cape Cod for example it is an I line and a D3. If the big surf beaches an I line and a D7. Airflow make a very good cold water I line in a wf format.

I carry my kit in a belt hung small plug bag which means everything inside it gets wet. Who cares its surf fishing and if you and your gear don't get wet then something has to be wrong.:D The first rule is you can't keep dry in the surf so don't worry yourself trying. Fly fishing for me is being mobile very mobile so I don't favour rucksacs or chest bags on my chest they have no place in the surf. Less is more in such a dynamic envoirament.

 

For leaders to kick off with just get yourself a spool of 20lb berkely XL mono and tye on whatever length you fancy. Anything from 2 feet to 6 feet works for sinking lines and 9 to 12 feet will work ok for smaller flies and with your floating lines. Tapered leaders work but not that much better than a piece of level 20lb mono.

 

Try not to over think stuff, as it could bog you down.

 

Have fun.

 

Mike

 

 

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J, let me help you out here...there seems to be a bit of paralysis by analysis on some of your questions, perhaps because it's the middle of february an there is nothing to fish for LOL!

 

I noticed that your avatar says the east end of long island, where I happen to fish alot, so I will taylor my recs to the fishing there...blues, bass and albies...

 

ROD - you bought a 9wt TFO BVK, this is a fine rod and one you can grow into. It casts as good as most rods at 3 times the price. 9 wt is the best all around rod for Montauk.

 

REEL- don't spend more than $250 -$300, frankly the TFO BVK reel looks quite good to me and will match your rod well, others can chime in on what they think a good inexpensive reel is. You could get a tibor, abel, nautilus, mako, etc but you don't need them, they are all sweet but are really expensive. If you really want one, look on ebay for a used one. again I like the TFO BVK. if you want to spend a little more than the BVK look at the Galvan torque or Ross Evolution LT. I have not used a Lamson, but people always say good things about them. I would not get an extra spool, you don't need it.

 

LINE - I would purchase one of two lines. Rio Striper intermediate (uplined to 10wt) or Rio outbound short intermediate (get a 9wt, do not overline, it's already overlined). The striper line is a go to line for many guides and anglers, can't go wrong here. The Outbound Short, is a shooting head design that is quite easy to load up the rod and cast far, however the skinny running line makes it pain because it tangles. Some will say that this line is for more experienced casters but I disagree, I have seen beginners learn quickly with this line because the feedback it gives the angler accelerates the learning curve. Get some 30lb dacron backing and fill the reel to the appropriate level. You do not need a floating line or a deep sinker.

 

If you asked most of the guides out there, Dixon, Mccarthy, Tondra, etc, I would be they say that 80% of their fishing is done with regular intermediates.

 

LEADERS - I would (and do) purchase pretied Rio striped bass leaders in 12lb and 16lb. These are simple to attach to your line via pretied loops in both the line and leader. You need some bite tippet. I use 30lb seaguar flurocarbon for bass and some tieable wire for bluefish (or you can buy the rio toothy critter pretied leaders that already have the wire tied on). Learn to tie a blood knot for tying the bite tippet to the leader and a no slip loop knot for tying on the fly. just google them for how to's.

 

Go to the tackle shop in Amagansett (don't go to MTK tackle shops, they don't cater to fly fisherman), ask the owner which flies you should use and when. Basically, clousers and deceivers for most of the year and anything that imitates rainbait in the fall. Make friends with the shop owner, he will help out a lot.

 

Once you have gotten your casting down, tides, flies, etc...then start thinking about different lines and more specialized techniques but if you get proficient with the rig described above you will be ahead of 80% of the fly anglers. if you are going to be casting from shore a lot, absolutely get a stripping basket. I like the Hip Shooter although you could make a homemade one yourself for far cheaper. Practice, practice, practice and the best way to practice is by going fishing!!

 

hope this helps...

 

Cpalms

 

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I have been using the 9wt BVK since last June, I find it casts well with the 9 wt lines I use, Cortland 444SL floater, Airflow cold saltwater Inter and DI7 I also use a Airflow running line with a T14 head. I have found no benefit in over lining.

The reel I use is a Danielson L5W with a selection of spare spools and have found it to be bullet proof but at a much lower price point I find that the Okuma Airframe will cover most shore fishing. Contrary to Cpalms I had problems with a Ross the drag failed several times and I got tired of getting it fixed so got rid of it. I have heard good things about Nautilas and not so good about Lamson.

 

Regarding leaders I am with Mike O on this straight through 20lb mono or fluro it aint pretty but it works tie on a wire tippet if Blues are around.

 

 

Gary

 

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I fished my 9wt BVK all last season. It's a well-designed rod that performs perfectly with the designated line weight. A Cortland Precision Little Tunny in 9 is my primary line, Wulff Triangle Taper when I fish a floater. Both are very well matched to the rod. I'd say close to 90% of the time I'm fishing the intermediate. I don't fish sink tips with the BVK.

 

I would suggest NOT overlining it, especially not with a Rio Striper intermediate, which is 305 grains in 10 wt.

 

(If you had bought a TiCrX or TiCr, I would say you absolutely should overline. Those rods are very hard for a beginner to cast with the rated line weights. That is not the case with the rod you chose.)

 

I've heard about corrosion issues with Lamson conical drags, but I've been using a Lamson Velocity 3.5 for at least five years with absolutely zero problems. It balances the rod nicely with the lines I use. I've never lost a fish because of this reel.

 

For leaders, I've experimented with hand-tied tapered leaders, extruded tapered, and straight mono. To be honest, I haven't seen much of a difference in catchability between them, especially in the environments you say you'll be fishing. The exception would be sight fishing on the flats, where I stick with my hand tied leaders with flouro tippet.

 

Cpalms has given you the best advice in this thread when he tells you to get or make a stripping basket.

 

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The problem of internet forums is the differring opinons you are going to get. Cpalms has some good advice for you. It is true for many of us that the I line is probably one of the most used lines from the shore. Especially true if you are fishing shallow bouldery ground say on the eastern end of LI where a fast sink line will be a right PITA. But go and fish a sandy beach on the south side and in a wave the I line is just way too slow to get you into the bite zone before the surf has messed you up. In a steep deep sandy beach a D7 or similar can be the difference between just casting all day and catching.

 

Leaders around bouldery ground In my view need to be upped quite a bit. 20lb to 30 lb will not put off a Striper. There are mainly two designs of stripping trays the washing bowl shape and the flat open type with cones/spikes. The Hip shooter works ok in small surf and if you are wading not very deep but for me in a surf the fly line is way too vulnerable to be washed around or off this kind of tray. As you get more adventurous there will be times when you have to toss the line tray onto the beach.

 

Cpalms,

 

Are you talking about the Fly Shop that used to be in a wood cabin on the south side of the highway run by a Frenchman. It used to have a canoe on the grass. Is there another fly shop in Amagansett as this one closed down at least three years ago. Your right about Paulies and Johnnies total deserts when it comes to fly tackle. Shame really but it does tell us a lot about the demand for fly gear out on the End. We are a tiny minority in Montauk but there are some great Guys I meet most years on the beaches plying the fly rod.

 

Mike

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Cpalms,

Are you talking about the Fly Shop that used to be in a wood cabin on the south side of the highway run by a Frenchman. It used to have a canoe on the grass. Is there another fly shop in Amagansett as this one closed down at least three years ago. Your right about Paulies and Johnnies total deserts when it comes to fly tackle. Shame really but it does tell us a lot about the demand for fly gear out on the End. We are a tiny minority in Montauk but there are some great Guys I meet most years on the beaches plying the fly rod.

Mike

 

I'm talking about the place called "The Tackle Shop" that is on the far east side of Amag, north side of 27, just west of Vicki's Veggie's next to a deli. He was open as of last fall cuz I bought a bunch of flies there. The owner's name is Harvey Bennett. He his a good guy, and an east end character.... the place I think you are talking about is the one behind the cell phone store just as you come into Amag on the west side of town. I think that place has been closed for a while, although I think the sign is still up...

 

 

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Cpalms,

 

I think I know the place then on the LHS driving towards Montauk. Never stopped as always in a rush to get to the End. Our rental house is not far up the road on Montauk Highway. The business that closed I quite liked and the French Guy was a character to. I am guessing lack of trade caused him to close down which was a shame. I never saw him on the beach. Fly shops in the areas Guys fish might struggle as many must come fully tooled up. We have to as we do not have time to go tackle shopping unless the sea is inside out.

 

Cheers

 

Mike

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The problem of internet forums is the differing opinions you are going to get.

 

That isn't a problem with internet forums, that's just the nature of asking people for their opinion. You're going to get a lot of contradictory statements, all offered in good faith because the writer is telling you what works for them.

 

The only way to get the right answer for you is to go out and play. Demo stuff at a fly show. Ask other guys to try out their setup. Fly guys are pretty friendly, not like those surly bait soakers and angry plug chuckers. :squid: Ask a fly fisherman about his gear and he'll likely offer to let you try it out. Just don't be wearing a Yankees hat when you stroll over and ask me about my stuff.

 

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pescatore,

 

Yes but I believe more than one or two Guys on here will committ to a purchase based on what they glean from a thread. If Guys did what you are suggesting they might do then there would be precious few questions like which rod, which line, which line tray. I am with you, ask away but you owe it to yourself and your wallet to try first if you can or except that some stuff is going to stink a bit. We have all been there. Fly Guys are pretty forthcoming and thats what I really like about the sport. I have not got a clue about Baseball or American Football. I guess it gets as Tribal as our Soccer.;)

 

Mike

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pescatore,

Yes but I believe more than one or two Guys on here will committ to a purchase based on what they glean from a thread. If Guys did what you are suggesting they might do then there would be precious few questions like which rod, which line, which line tray. I am with you, ask away but you owe it to yourself and your wallet to try first if you can or except that some stuff is going to stink a bit. We have all been there. Fly Guys are pretty forthcoming and thats what I really like about the sport. I have not got a clue about Baseball or American Football. I guess it gets as Tribal as our Soccer.;)

Mike

 

While I totally agree with you, for me and many others, it is usually impractical to go out test rods and lines. I wish I could but I live in a city and work 70 hrs a week. Testing time takes away from my fishing time and my buddies' gear is never what I want use anyway LOL, half of their gear is my handbedowns anyway. I practically have to rely what I read on the internet - or to at least narrow down the options. If you spend enough time here or Blanton's boards and some others you can glean out whose opinion you should listen to. Look, it is an expensive sport, I know some stuff I buy I won't like...so I give it away or sell it, but thankfully I have a place like this were I can go to that helps at least eliminate stuff from consideration and at most, puts me on the right gear.

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You will get plenty of opinions about lines so I won't add mine, except to say that I don't think you should overline the BVK rods. I have cast the 6 weight BVK and I own the 6 weight TiCRx. Whereas the TiCRx is very stiff and can benefit from uplining one line weight or even two, the BVK is true to its weight rating. I think overlining it will cost you distance and performance.

 

As for reels, the TFO sales reps I have spoken to say that TFO brought out the BVK reel to balance the very light BVK rods because other reels were too heavy. Now perhaps they really only meant other TFO reels, and perhaps there are competing brands that would balance the rod just as well. However, If you can't test before you buy, to be safe I would suggest you buy either the BVK reel that is designed specifically for your rod, or another make that has a very similar weight and line capacity.

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While I totally agree with you, for me and many others, it is usually impractical to go out test rods and lines. I wish I could but I live in a city and work 70 hrs a week. Testing time takes away from my fishing time and my buddies' gear is never what I want use anyway LOL, half of their gear is my handbedowns anyway. I practically have to rely what I read on the internet - or to at least narrow down the options. If you spend enough time here or Blanton's boards and some others you can glean out whose opinion you should listen to. Look, it is an expensive sport, I know some stuff I buy I won't like...so I give it away or sell it, but thankfully I have a place like this were I can go to that helps at least eliminate stuff from consideration and at most, puts me on the right gear.

 

Now you are just being a total Realist.:) How the hell do you find time to do anything working 70 hour weeks. I hope you enjoy your job and that it is more of a vocation rather than a hard slog. I got fired two years ago and I still miss what I call real work. I am self employed now and only accasionlly do a 40 hour week but Sunday night sees my mind start to go into stress mode. Overall the internet is useful but I would not like to have to rely on it myself if I was just starting out. But I now have the benifit of age on my side and a mind that likes to challange a lot of the old myths which surround our sport. If only I knew what I know now when I was 22. LOL No not really I would not have wanted to have missed the journey I am still walking. I stopped running about 5 years ago. I think if we stay away from the BS spouted by Journalists and Tackle reps we should be OK. This forum is probably one of the very best I go onto. There are some very good Guys on here. Do you ever get out to the End?

 

Mike

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ROD - you bought a 9wt TFO BVK, this is a fine rod and one you can grow into. It casts as good as most rods at 3 times the price. 9 wt is the best all around rod for Montauk.

REEL- don't spend more than $250 -$300, frankly the TFO BVK reel looks quite good to me and will match your rod well, others can chime in on what they think a good inexpensive reel is. You could get a tibor, abel, nautilus, mako, etc but you don't need them, they are all sweet but are really expensive. If you really want one, look on ebay for a used one. again I like the TFO BVK.

 

 

I let this thread rest for a little bit and am doing some more research into the reels.

Looking at the TFO BVK REELS to pair with my 9wt BVK rod , they only have three sizes. From what I've read online the largest BVK is suggested for 8wt lines. Would this not be appropriate for my 9wt? Too small?

 

Here are the specs:

 

TFR BVK SLA III TFO BVK Super Large Arbor Reel III 4.10" (diameter) 1.30" (width) 5.2 oz. (weight) 205 yards/20lb./WF8F (capacity)

 

This is versus the Lamson Guru which I am also looking at:

 

Lamson GURU 3.5 3.75" (diameter) 1.38" (width) 6.20 oz (weight) 8,9 (rod weight) WF9200 yds 20#

 

I don't really know how their other features stack up. Ie. drag systems.

 

I know the BVK was new last year & won ICAST best in show but I can't find too many user reviews online.

THanks guys

 

Joel

 

 

 

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