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billyb

Heading to Lauderdale/Boynton Beach early March

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I am going down to Fort Lauderdale and Boynton Beach in early March 5-11 and would like to know if anyone has any recommendations for drift boat fishing in the area. I am already going on a charter for sailfish and another night charter for tarpon. I also like to fish freswater and do pretty well at Lake Osbourne from shore but I will be spending time in Dania and there are a million ponds and would like to try some freshwater if anyone could recommend any of the ponds or lakes in the area. I will not always have a car. I also would like to know if the canal by grifin road is worth trying for peacocks or if I need to go to Miami for them. I may be going out of the Lady Pamela 2 all day Mahi trip as well and would like to know if this is a good bet or if it is too early in the season as this is a warmer season this year.

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I'm usually more of a frequent flier to that area in the summer...but the one time I went in March, I caught some decent snook at a small park at Hillsboro Inlet in Pompano Beach....as far as drift boats, there was one right directly across A1A from that park who fished the reefs...I forget the name of it, but the one time I went out in March, it was fairly decent for smaller bottom fish - assortment of some type of snappers, small grouper (I caught a red colored grouper that was about 14-15 inches long) and some other tropical looking fish (I think the bluish round shaped fish we caught w/ a spine thingy on each side just in front of the tail was called a surgeon fish)....but on that same boat in the summer, although they still advertise the same type of fishing, you can actually slay the albies, king mackerel....and I've seen cobia, mahi mahi and barracuda caught. I didn't see any of that on my march trip, but that doesn't mean it won't happen

 

I also fished that Angler's Pier in Lauderdale by the Sea during that same March trip and scored some barracuda, jacks and some needle fish...

 

So in other words, it's not my favorite time to go...but you can find something to bend your rod.

 

PS - if you like to try for some peacocks in freshwater, head out to Sawgrass Mills Mall....there's a series of small lakes/ponds out there that hold them...Unfortunately the one time I tried it, I only caught lalrge mouth bass and something called a chiliad, which was a small 'sunfish'-like fish....but I had one chase while using a clouser minnow on a flyrod from what was distinctly a peacock bass. It came up, chased it - then once it turned off, it positioned itself sideways for a moment so I get clearly see it's profile....but one thing about that fishery...a year or two ago, the area was hit by a hard freeze and a lot of the Broward Co peacocks were killed off....supposedly Dade Co still had/has some good peacock fishing...and at this time, I don't know how well it has rebounded (if at all)....btw, I mentioned those lakes around the malls - as you drive out there, you'll see a lot of canals throughout the neighborhoods you drive past and supposed they hold peacock bass as well, although I've never tried them....but just a fair warning that some of these neighborhoods look a little seedy....and if you decided to take the 20-30 south to Dade Co, people warned me not to leave my car out of site at many of these many little fishing holes

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Yes the Griffin Canal still holds Peacocks. Be careful where you step when fishing the canals don't step on or near the fire ant mounds. That will ruin your day! There is a guy called the land captain, Steve Kantner that guides from his car...***edited, please stop posting links***  He has a good reputation down here for knowing the canals,ponds and lakes.


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Thanks a lot for the info and I specifically asked about Fort Lauderdale because I was worried about Miami being a little sketchy. Last time down this way in Feb/March I actually did better with the largemouth from shore than the drift boats and pier fishing so I think I will target them again. I live in the Boston area so having all these ponds to fish is awesome and it seems the locals don't care so much about pond fishing with all the other options.

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Yes the Griffin Canal still holds Peacocks. Be careful where you step when fishing the canals don't step on or near the fire ant mounds. That will ruin your day! There is a guy called the land captain, Steve Kantner that guides from his car. He has a good reputation down here for knowing the canals,ponds and lakes.

 

Thanks for the guide info. Are shoes enough protection from the fire ants? I do not wear sandals or go barefoot so I never had a problem with them up by Lake Osborne and the canals nearby.

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Thanks for the guide info. Are shoes enough protection from the fire ants? I do not wear sandals or go barefoot so I never had a problem with them up by Lake Osborne and the canals nearby.

 

No - doing your best to avoid these ant hills your best bet. They'll climb right onto your shoes and up your legs. Here's some info I got from the Orkin (pest control) site:

 

Latin Name:

Solenopsis

 

Appearance:

Reddish, about 1/4-inch long. Read more about identification of fire ants.

 

Habit:

Nest in mounds of 1 to 2 feet in diameter and about 1/2-foot high. Large colonies can have up to 250,000 workers. Very active and aggressive, they will sting any intruding animal repeatedly.

 

Diet:

Omnivorous. Known to eat meats, greasy and sweet materials.

 

Reproduction:

Total time from egg to adult averages 30 days; workers live up to 180 days; queens live two to six years.

 

Fire Ant Facts

Though not a native species in North America, the red imported fire ant has become a common nuisance throughout the southern United States such as Florida and Georgia. The Solenopsis invicta, or red imported fire ant, was brought into the United States in the 1930's via a shipment of cargo. Initially transplanted into Alabama, they have spread and thrived throughout the southern states with the warm climate and lack of predators. They have been found as far west as California and as far north as Maryland.

 

Fire ants favor warm, sunny conditions. They prefer dry fields and avoid shady areas such as woods. Their mounds can grow up to 24 inches in diameter and 18 inches high. These colonies can contain several hundred thousand ants, including at least one queen.

 

When attacking, fire ants first use their mandibles to attach themselves to their prey, and then inject venom through the stinger. Fire ant stings are painful for most humans and fatal to some: if a victim experiences a severe reaction such as sweating, nausea or excessive itching, emergency medical services should be contacted immediately. Most sting victims experience painful red bumps: a topical antihistamine and a cold compress may help in soothing fire ant stings. Their sting, which includes alkaloid venom, is highly irritating to humans and results in red bumps and white pustules, which can ultimately lead to scarring. The sensation of a fire ant burn has been described as "stinging" and "intense burning," and fire ants are known to attack potential threats or prey in large numbers. A fire ant colony may contain 100,000 to 500,000 insects, thus increasing the likelihood that multiple stings will be inflicted.

 

Your local pest control professional should be contacted in the event of a fire ant infestation. Professionals can manage lawn infestations while securing homes against indoor invasions.

 

Annual Fire Ant Treatment and Prevention

Because fire ants are not a native species in North America, developing strategies for their control has proven difficult. The most reliable method of fire ant treatment and prevention is to have your local pest control company perform an inspection and determine how to kill the fire ants in your home.

 

To prevent bites or stings away from the home, be cautious around large open areas. If you see a fire ant mound, keep an eye on the ground to watch for ant activity. If you can, stick to the shade and cooler areas, as fire ants prefer sunny locations.

 

 

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Your eyes are your best protection! Watch wear you step. Of course if the fire ants don't get ya the water moccasins mightwink.gif



Seriously just walk the canals and ponds with your eyes open and be aware of your surroundings and have fun.



Sorry about the link boss.


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Thanks for the info on the fire ants. I spoke to a rep at Bass Pro in Dania and he recommended Snyder park and I think they have canoe or kayak rentals. I also noticed Topeekeegee park and the rent kayaks in March so I may try there as well. I think he may have said that snyder has peacocks.

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I got your message, but as i just joined Stripers online, i cant send private messages for a few more days. If you could send me your email, i can send you the pics of the kayak/motor mount if you send it to me via private message i can still read it and i will email you.


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