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grousechaser

Broken hooks on rocky beaches

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I've had that problem too, both on a sandy beach, and mountain streams. My solution was to slow down my cast a little, and throw my backcast higher. The result will be like casting on an inclined plane behind you. I learned that trick from watching Gary Borger tapes, and it's worked for me for many years. Though, sometimes I get lazy and still snap a hook.

 

If you're on a small stream, try a roll cast with no backcast at all. Hope this helps.

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Pretty doubtful considering the speed that the fly is going, if you made the guard stiff enough to be effective, it would probably prevent the hooking of fish.

JC

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Tube flies are great because you can replace just the hook. And you can use cheaper and stronger carbon steel hook. It lasts many sessions and when it rusts take a new one. And when the leader breaks (this happens occationally) fish should get rid of the tube fly easy and hook will rust off very fast in saltwater as well.

 

I usually use barbless hooks which are easy to remove (from your own skin too). But if removing the hook will harm fish it might be better to cut the line and leave rusting hook and hope the fish survives. I don't have any facts but I believe hook causes less stress than keeping fish out of water for a long time.

 

Once I got a freshwater Pike which had my brothers lure in its mouth when his line broke about a week earlier. When we removed the lure the hook was already so bad that lure would have dropped off very soon.

 

Esa

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Does anyone think that a mono loop tied on a fly in the weed guard fashion would prevent broken hooks on the back cast when it hits the rocks ?

 

No. Work on your back cast, go to a 2H rod if you must, and treat flies as expendable. I must've left a pound of fishhook points in Mt Sinai harbor beaches alone for this reason. :D :D :D

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Absolutely. The rocks or hooks aren't the problem here, its the casting.

 

 

 

Uh, yeah i know. I was just trying to avoid breaking a $5 fly every time I made a mistake.

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Uh, yeah i know. I was just trying to avoid breaking a $5 fly every time I made a mistake.

 

We all break hooks on rocks behind us good casts or no. Its part of the game. Regretfully I don't know of a way to avoid connecting with rocks 100% of the time. You can reduce your costs though by tying your own flies. TH are not the solution either.

 

Mike

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I often run into this sort of thing in my favorite fishing spots on the rocky Maine coast. Most of the time, I don't mind. However, it can really annoy me. My favorite shop has a special pattern that is my goto 95% of the time. It's a specialized Clouser variant, and I have more confidence in it than any other pattern. Any time I tie one on, I feel like I could catch a fish on the first cast. The problem it that the eyes tend to either fall off when double-hauling (most likely caused by me, as I know the guy who ties them), or they come off on the rocks behind me. It ALWAYS seems to happen right after I tie a fresh one one.

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Satan plans it that way. If you tie on something made with expensive material (a Hollow Fleye made with real polar bear hair, say, it should set you back a few hundred dollars) I guarantee the Devil will conjure up a three-pound bluefish to cut it off.

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I had a bunch of Conomo specials tied up for me. I usually tie my own flies but this recipe was expensive. Damned if i starting breaking the points off at Montauk. That hurt. Yes I have to watch the backcast, I know. I also have a TH rod and I had no problems with that..

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When I lived on Long Island and fished the North Shore gravel strewn beaches at night, you could always tell if you were approaching flyfishermen by the sparks on the gravel from hooks striking stone. Kind of cool.

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