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HanoverStriper

Cape Dolphins

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Anyone have any theories as to why they are beaching themselves? I hate to see it.

 

"In the last month, 177 short-beaked common dolphins have stranded on Cape Cod, and 124 have died. The total is nearly five times the average of 37 common dolphins that have stranded annually during the last 12 years."

 

 

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Natures population control. I think it happens naturally, something to do with the earths magnetic field. It happens every year, right?

 

There was another thread on this a few weeks ago that got kind of hostile.

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Natures population control. I think it happens naturally, something to do with the earths magnetic field. It happens every year, right?

There was another thread on this a few weeks ago that got kind of hostile.

 

Oh, sorry I missed another hostile thread.

 

I understand it happens every year, just thought the numbers this year were pretty staggering. 5x the average of the last 12 years.

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Well the most obvious difference is that sea surface temps are higher this winter, but whether that is a major factor in these dolphin strandings is open to debate, Even the so-called experts aren't really sure what's causing it.

 

-bd

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Well the most obvious difference is that sea surface temps are higher this winter, but whether that is a major factor in these dolphin strandings is open to debate, Even the so-called experts aren't really sure what's causing it.

-bd

 

Yes, that's what I assumed as well. Looks like there are no current answers, and that is a logical assumption.

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Natures population control. I think it happens naturally, something to do with the earths magnetic field. It happens every year, right?

There was another thread on this a few weeks ago that got kind of hostile.

 

i wouldn't say it got hostile, just a difference of opinion of whether to help them or leave them to "natures way".

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/t/834816/wellfleet-dolphins

 

since no one really know why they are stranding, some believe it's a natural occurrence, and some are open to the possibility something mankind has done may be the cause.

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A friend of mine works for the marine mammal rescue and has been working overtime this year! She also had mentioned that one thing that they have seen in their data is that during changes in cycles of the North Atlantic Oscillation (~15 years) is that they see much more strandings than normal; though this year is a record year even for that! She emphasized though that this is just an observation though, not a proven link.

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I always thought that the cycle of the moon does something to them, lower low tides, magnetic pull as someone mentioned.

 

yet they all seem to be in a generlized location. doubth they were chsing bait in close...

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The stranding of more then the usual numbers along our coast line have every one concerned..

Especially ,when no known reason exists, that any one can put a finger on it to explain this life long event during the winter months here on Cape Cod.

 

During the early times the natives would prepare them for food, but being protected, does not allow that any more.

 

Do we have more stranding's, because we have more of a population in the water?

 

Is it some long lost ritual that man has never been able to understand in the world of marine science?

 

The debate goes on, one thing at least for me , is that the effort to save what ever they can, is a worthy cause in the long term life of marine wildlife

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Just yesterday on the weather they mentioned that reports from fishermen as well as some research vessels are reporting very strong currents.Much stronger than normally encountered.Maybe warmer temps mean stronger currents and they are being effected by them.


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The stranding of more then the usual numbers along our coast line have every one concerned..

Especially ,when no known reason exists, that any one can put a finger on it to explain this life long event during the winter months here on Cape Cod.

During the early times the natives would prepare them for food, but being protected, does not allow that any more.

Do we have more stranding's, because we have more of a population in the water?

Is it some long lost ritual that man has never been able to understand in the world of marine science?

The debate goes on, one thing at least for me , is that the effort to save what ever they can, is a worthy cause in the long term life of marine wildlife

 

 

 

I happen to disagree on that 'effort to save' business. Every animal that has ever lived in the sea has - or will - die. Do you try to 'save' all of them? Whatever goes on with marine mammal strandings, they've been doing it as long as we know, and probably as long as the species have existed. Individuals die, and the species goes on just fine.

 

The fact is that whales and dolphins that strand frequently restrand themselves after being 'rescued' and released. This is a known fact, and the people who do the rescuing don't dispute it. At some point, I have to ask myself whether the rescuers are rescuing the animals for the animals, or for themselves? I've watched red-tailed hawks pull a squirrel off the ground and fly it to a tree to tear it apart. Should I 'rescue' the squirrel? There's a presumption that the dolphins just 'got lost' or something. These are not only highly intelligent animals, but they are survivors of millions of years of evolution. They are designed to keep themselves alive in their environment. For them, moving through water in a bay is like walking across the ground through air. They don't just 'forget' that they are in shallow water, and they aren't surprised by tides.

 

Obviously I have a non-rescue take on this subject. I see nature running its course. Death - even deaths that are mysterious to us - are just nature's way. If I thought that dolphins just lost track of time and forgot they were in shallow water, I'd have no problem with these rescues. The scientific evidence says otherwise. I was trained in biology, and I know a little about animal behavior and animal ecology. This isn't someone's granny forgotten in an unheated apartment, this is nature's way. Dolphins got by just fine without humans messing with them, and in time, when humans have disappeared, I'm sure they'll continue doing just fine.

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If anyone wants that warm and fuzzy feeling you get when you "rescue" an animal should go to your local shelter and adopt a kitten or puppy and let nature run it's natural course!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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