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inthered

Flies for PA in May

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Gee, I never thought that I would ever be in this forum, and yet, here I am.



 



Apparently I’ll be fly fishing for trout in May, upstate Pennsylvania.  My fly fishing for trout is essentially zilch.  This is not a passion for me in having been only a few times, in Jersey.  I used bead head nymphs on those occasions.



 



Might someone here give me couple of “must have” suggestions for PA in May?  I know I could research this myself, but I’m not looking to become learned so as to be seriously successful.  I’m just going for a new experience and don’t want to be casting something that will hold no possibilities.


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Hi inthered,

 

Nice to see you travel from the dark side to over here. Love your approach. Ok when I go fsh a new area I have a few go to flies that seem to work everywhere. The no one is a PT ( pheasant tail ) nymph in sizes 10 to 16. Gold Ribbed Hares Ear in 12 to 14 and a greenwells Glory in a 12 and 14. So these are my sub surface flies. On top I fish a Grenwells Glory ( rough Olive imitation) 14 and 16. Black Knat size 14 and 16 and any old floating sedge. If you limited me to two flies it would be a PT and a Greenwells Glory. I don't bother with Streamers as I think they are total junk. I don't like fishing downstream for Trout. Leaders about 3lb in mono and away you go. More important to get the presentation right than worry about matching the hatch. Find a feeding fish don't scare it and you have a great chance of catching it. Have tuns of fun Buddy.

 

mike

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Is it a spring creek? If so, stock up on those small PTs!! I'd even go smaller than what Mike said, 18-20 is my preference. If you don't see rising fish, nymph the pocket water with an anchor fly (beadhead gold ribbed hares ear or prince nymph in sz 12-16) and a trailing size 18 PT... Place an indicator about 1.5x the depth of the water above the anchor fly... Short quartering cast upstream and follow the indicator with the rod, hi-sticking it to maintain a drag-free drift... and set the hook on everything! You should catch!

 

IMO Nymphing is one of the easiest and best ways to get into fly fishing. No hero casts required, one can get right on top of the fish in pocket water, and very effective.

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inthered,

 

KGJ is spot on as regards fly size. I had forgotten that in the USA especially in, small streams it is very small flies that do the trick. Might need to go lighter than 3lb for your leader to present these smaller patterns.

 

Mike

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Yup.

 



Quote:

Originally Posted by KGJ View Post

Is it a spring creek?

 



 



Thank you, Mike Oliver and KGJ and, everyone else.  Yeah, it seems silly to thank everyone, but I didn’t need much and, I’m sure I would have gotten great suggestions from friendly people.  If this forum might be like those for the dark side there should be hours (or days) worth of entertaining bickering left is this thread, over whatever.



 



So, thank you everyone; thank you KGJ, and too, for also additionally throwing in your tips; and thank you Mike Oliver.  Mike, I figured if I were to go for a new experience, I had better do it while I am still flexible.  wink.gif



 



(Oh, and I asked this now, so far in advance, only because I have free promotional money that must be used before Thursday.  biggrin.gif )



 



Thanks all and Regards.


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Point C is completely right. Cdc or foam parachute emergers are deadly!! When in May will make all the difference.... If its late, you stand a chance at hitting the green Drake hatch depending on the stream, and Drake emergers and coffin flies will take plenty of fish. Feel free to pm me if you want, but I would say a varied selection of emergers combined with a few rusty spinners, coffin flies, and small nymphs should catch you plenty. Good luck.

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Ut-oh!  I see where this might lead.  tongue.gif



 



You know, any aspect of fishing turns into a real risky business, and it's all because as one learns more he is likely to want to be prepared--just in case.  I've done this in my surf fishing (on the dark side).  Perhaps I already know enough for this trip.  bucktooth.gif



 



icon14.gif  But thank you for the additional info.  If I get hooked I'll be back, but feel free to continue using this thread in thinking about spring.



 



Regards, Tom 



 


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scuds, small pts, zebra midges, bhhes,  caddis larva 12- 18 that should cover a majority of your bases in just about every stream in pa if your nymphing, dry flys are a whole nother book. depends on where your fishing. but cdc caddis, olives, small midges, maybe a sulpher or two, and throw in an ant pattern for fun and you should be able to catch fish. hope this helps smile.gif


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I’m tired already and see that I’ll need more than just a Big fly box but a jacket or a vest with plenty of pockets.  Do they make these?  tongue.gif



 



Well, maybe I’ll just need a big fly box!  "Cul de Canard"; see, I’m sinking into this quagmire already!  I’m thinking of just replacing soaked flies with those from an ample supply of dry ones.  As for the pockets, I’m thinking that removing the tubes from a small surf bag, that I have, will provide what I need.



 



Flies and nymphs:  I’ve been given suggestions here—which I really appreciate—and I compared these to those that I later found on the Internet when searching for information about central PA fly fishing.  The site about central PA fly fishing followed up almost every suggestion with “except Spring Creek.”



 



I’m going to keep it simple, because I’m stupid.  Between what I have and what I have available to me, I think the only ones that I may pick-up will be Caddis in olive, tan or black, and maybe Cahill.  Of the five that a friend recommended, only the Sulphur was not followed with “except Spring Creek.”



 



The lineup for a mid-May start, Spring Creek near Morris, PA:  Bead Head Prince; PT; Sulphur; Caddis; Black Gnat; and, Cahill.



 



Thanks again, all.  Just for your entertainment, I’ll come back and let you know how I took to the fishing and the fish to the flies.   bucktooth.gif  


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Just make sure you have a couple green drake emergers in size 8 and 10. I like the parachute tied ones with a foam post.

 

While mid-May is on the early side for the GD hatch, with this warm weather they may come off early. If you're lucky enough (and also patient... They hatch right around dusk and into the night) you may be rewarded with some of the most spectacular fishing known in PA. And once they start to come off the trout get keyed on them... I've caught on those emergers during the middle of the day when nothing was rising, just because the fish are so focused on the big bites.

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The results. 



Quote:

Originally Posted by inthered View Post


Thanks again, all.  Just for your entertainment, I’ll come back and let you know how I took to the fishing and the fish to the flies.   bucktooth.gif  





As it turned out, the need for a very big fly box was true in a yes and no sort of way.  I found this to be just like surf fishing as I had imagine right at the start.  One needs a lot, just in case, but not really.



 



It seems that this warmer than usual spring caused some hatches to come off about, maybe, three weeks early.  I was there fishing from the 15th through 17th.  Talk was that Green Drakes were just starting on one of the creeks, but I bought two of those imitations because I saw big pale green flies on a different creek that I was fishing.  The green drake imitation didn’t look like the pale green real fly that I had seen (I bought the “imitations” anyway).



 



My first take was on a tan Cahill.  It wasn’t a trout, but I thought it was right up until I cupped it in my hand.  As it turned out, it wasn’t even a creek chub as one of our group speculated.  I later learned about fallfish.



 



Loved it!  I didn’t know that I could be clam and patient—with fish right there!  One of our guys sent me the following which is quite coincidental to my experience: 



 



By Reg Henry / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette First Published May 16, 2012



 



Before entering this column, readers should be alert to two advisories:



 



1) No fish were harmed in the production of this column. 2) Women readers should exercise discretion, because the subject matter concerns men behaving badly.



 



This is a tale about going back to an era when men were men and women, being women, laughed at them. Perhaps things haven't changed much.



You will understand this tale better if the words "fish camp" hold special meaning for you. For years now, those two words have tantalized my imagination.



In the beginning, a band of men left Pittsburgh and drove up to the northern woods of Pennsylvania for a few days of manly adventures. They did this every year, and I came to envy them.



 



And why would any man not envy them? Their activities were said to include eating (ravenously), drinking (excessively), laughing (outrageously), scratching (immodestly), boasting (prodigiously) and singing (off key-ly). Also, smoking cigars, telling dubious jokes, making impolite noises, ribbing fellow fish campers and shooting firearms ("Only when entirely sober, Your Honor").



 



Oh, and fishing. While the term fish camp may suggest fish putting up little tents on the bed of a river and singing campfire songs underwater, only men stay in fish camp. From time to time they put on waders and attempt to fly-fish for trout -- "attempt" being the operative word because the trout remain pretty safe.



This year, I was invited to join the manly company of fish campers, standards not being what they once were. Was it my talent for dubious jokes that won the campers over? My ability to make impolite noises?



 



Whatever the reason, last weekend my dream came true and I became part of a long tradition. I went to a fish camp established in 1921 along Kettle Creek in Potter County.



 



They call this part of Pennsylvania "God's Country," and they are not far wrong. The Almighty did a wonderful job when he last vacationed here. It is a wild and beautiful place, and only a little more than a four-hour drive north and east from Pittsburgh.



 



There I fished amid the ghosts of scratching and laughing men of generations past, men who surely sang the fish camp song ("Men, men, men, men, men (low notes) ... Men! (high note) Wonderful men!").



 



Fish camp is just like you might imagine. It is in the middle of nowhere, far down a dirt road from civilization. Set in a valley amid wooded mountains, with a creek babbling nearby, fish camp is a modest bungalow big enough to hold six babbling men.



 



There is a small kitchen, a living room of sorts with a coyote skin hung over one beam to make the place feel homely, and a bunkhouse attached at the back.



Steaks were cooked on a small grill outside. Every few minutes someone would come by and put the lid up and someone else would then come by and demand the lid be down. In this way, the steaks were fanned to perfection by the lid going up and down.



 



One of our campers was a notorious snorer -- let us call him Joe -- and he was required to sleep in the living room because it was feared that his snoring might attract bears looking for mates.



 



This seemed unfair. The bunkhouse sounded like the bears had already moved in and were cuddling my fellow campers, with the bunkhouse swaying on its foundations with every titanic snort. Meanwhile, in the next room, Joe quietly slept the sleep of the smugly innocent.



 



For those who cannot stand the din, an old-fashioned outhouse can be visited out back with old-fashioned reading material for those planning to sit a spell. You don't even have to bring your own spiders; they are supplied free. Fish campers think of everything.



 



Of course I had a wonderful time. It was a complete break, far from politics, far from the usual disputes, far even from cell phone communication. My only temptation was to pick up my dead cell phone and talk to myself about all the fish I didn't catch. Not a one.



 



I was dressed in all my fly-fishing gear -- the rubber pants that gave me a frog-like air, the little jacket hung with flies and other equipment never needed -- and yet the trout remained totally uncooperative. And was I sorry? No, because where else can a man stand up to his chest in water amid breathtaking scenery?



 



I have found a new hobby. And when I tire of eating, drinking and singing ("Men, men, men, men ... etc.") I am going to take up fly-fishing. I cast for trout, but I hooked contentment.

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i would make sure you have some cdc suplhur emergers

 

they were fantastic late may for me in the state colege area

 

little j, penns creek, etc

 

These have done well for me up here lately...I have to ad Elk Hair Caddis (tan or olive belly) as well. Probably my #1 right now.

-----------------------

A lot depends on exactly what creeks you'll be fishing up here. The little creeks will mainly be for Brookies and small bows...The rivers like the lackawaxen are very different. Much bigger fish and much higher numbers as well. Bigger flies for these fish usualy. Beadhead wolly bugger when the fish aren't rising is the go to here. Olive and black.

 

The sulfurs are coming soon and thats when things get really good.

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foulhook,  Elk Hair Caddis, tan.  icon14.gif



 



A buddy got a nice one on a trailing PT nymph.  I had size 10 beadhead woolybuggers with me (that I had originally gotten, years ago, for small mouth) but didn't try them because the dry fly was the new experience.  confused.gif  I had thought about it, but didn't.



 



Gray Fox were good too.

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